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Welcome to Encyclopedia Thelemica
The Encyclopedia Thelemica was born on 12 October 2008 and it's the home of the Aleister Crowley Timeline.
This project of The Aleister Crowley Society is devoted, as is its parent site, LAShTAL.COM, to impartiality,
and it will become the definitive online source of information about Thelema and the life and works of Aleister Crowley.
The Encyclopedia Thelemica is a fork of http://www.thelemapedia.org/ published by Scarlet Woman Lodge, OTO.
Now containing over 974 articles:
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Amun

Amoun was the Hellenicized name of a major Egyptian deity, in the native language Amun, "the hidden one" (alternative spelling "Amon"). He was one of the Ogdoad and was married to Ipet. He was also a Berber god, but there were differences between the Berber Ammon and the Egyptian Ammon. The Greeks honoured the Berber Ammon, and the Phoenicians mixed their god Baal with the Berber Ammon to create the god Baal-Ammon.

The Egyptian Amoun

He was, to begin with, the local deity of Thebes, when it was an unimportant town on the east bank of the river, about the region now occupied by the temple of Karnak. The Eleventh dynasty dynasty sprang from a family in the Hermonthite nome or perhaps at Thebes itself, and adorned the temple of Karnak with statues. Amenemhe, the name of the founder of the Twelfth dynasty, was compounded with that of Amun and was borne by three of his successors. Several Theban kings of the later part of the Middle Kingdom adopted the same name; and when the Theban family of the Seventeenth dynasty drove out the Hyksos, Ammon, as the god of the royal city, was again prominent.

It was not, however, until the rulers of the Eighteenth dynasty carried their victorious arms beyond the Egyptian frontiers in every direction that Ammon began to assume the proportions of a universal god for the Egyptians, eclipsing all their other deities and asserting his power over the gods of all foreign lands. To Ammon the Pharaohs attributed all their successful enterprises, and on his temples they lavished their wealth and captured spoil. (more...)
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Theodor Reuss
  • ... that Nicholas Flamel was a French alchemist who lived in the fifteenth century, and is supposed to have been the most accomplished of the European alchemists? It is claimed that he succeeded at the two magical goals of alchemy: he made the Philosopher's Stone that turns lead into gold, and he and his wife Perenelle achieved immortality.
  • ... that "Egypt" is a Greek corruption of the phrase "Het-Ka-Ptah", or "House of the Spirit of Ptah"?
  • ... that the term chaos magic first appeared in print in the widely influential "Liber Null" by Peter Carroll, first published in 1978?
 
 
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Kangchenjunga Map by Jacot-Guillarmod, 1914

"There was no time to spare, if we were to attack Kanchenjunga this summer. It was arranged that the doctor was to get together the necessary provisions and equipment at once in Europe, while I went direct to Darjeeling to make arrangements with the government about transport and such communications as the heliograph, by which means we intended to signal our progress to observers on Signal Hill, above the station, to collect some of our old Kashmir shikaris if possible, to learn a little Nepali, and perhaps to enlist the assistance of enterprising individuals on the spot.

I left for London on May 6th and made such preparations with regard to my personal equipment as seemed desirable, and on May 12th left England for the East by the P & O S.S. Marmora. Eckenstein maintained constantly that the adventure was foolhardy; that, for his own part, he would never consent to go on a mountain again with Jacot Duillarmod; and that, in one way or another, his vanity, inexperience, fatuity and folly were certain to land us in disaster. I liked Tartarin so well, personally, that I unconsciously minimized his imbecility; and I was still much too young to realize how much mischief may be done indirectly be the mere presence of such a man, despite every precaution that prudence can suggest and all the supervision that caution can recommend. So I went into it --- and realize only of late how lucky I was to come out of it all!"

("The Confessions of Aleister Crowley", Chapter 51)


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