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Welcome to Encyclopedia Thelemica
The Encyclopedia Thelemica was born on 12 October 2008 and it's the home of the Aleister Crowley Timeline.
This project of The Aleister Crowley Society is devoted, as is its parent site, LAShTAL.COM, to impartiality,
and it will become the definitive online source of information about Thelema and the life and works of Aleister Crowley.
The Encyclopedia Thelemica is a fork of http://www.thelemapedia.org/ published by Scarlet Woman Lodge, OTO.
Now containing over 974 articles:
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Piero della Francesca: Legend of the True Cross - the Queen of Sheba Meeting with Solomon , Detail. (c. 1452-66, Fresco, San Francesco, Arezzo, Italy)

Solomon or Shlomo Hebrew: שְׁלֹמֹה; Standard Hebrew: Šəlomo; Tiberian Hebrew: Šəlōmōh, meaning "peace"; Arabic: سليمان Sulayman) in the Tanakh (Old Testament), also called Jedidiah, was the third and last King of united Israel (including Judah), builder of the Temple in Jerusalem, renowned for his great wisdom and wealth and power, but also blamed for his later pacifism toward his converted wives in their worship of other gods. He is the subject of many later legends. He is also in a line of the biggest Kabbalah masters.

The name Solomon The name Solomon (Shlomo) means "peaceful," from the Hebrew Shelomoh (Arabic Sulayman). The name given by God to Solomon in the Bible is Jedidiah, meaning "loved by God", (2 Samuel 12:25), and some scholars have conjectured that Solomon is a "king name" taken either when he assumed the throne or upon his death.

Solomon's case is one of the few in the Bible where the name given by God does not stay with the character. Solomon's birth is considered a grace from God, after the death of the previous child between David and Bathsheba. (more...)
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Theodor Reuss
  • ... that Nicholas Flamel was a French alchemist who lived in the fifteenth century, and is supposed to have been the most accomplished of the European alchemists? It is claimed that he succeeded at the two magical goals of alchemy: he made the Philosopher's Stone that turns lead into gold, and he and his wife Perenelle achieved immortality.
  • ... that "Egypt" is a Greek corruption of the phrase "Het-Ka-Ptah", or "House of the Spirit of Ptah"?
  • ... that the term chaos magic first appeared in print in the widely influential "Liber Null" by Peter Carroll, first published in 1978?
 
 
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(Statue of Dionysus. Marble, 2nd century CE (arms and legs were heavily restored in the 18th century), found in Italy. Richelieu Collection; seized during the French Revolution, 1793. Louvre Museum, Department of Greek, Etruscan and Roman antiquities, Deno)

The Greek god Dionysus (or Dionysos, Iacchus or Iakkhos, Bacchus or Bakkhos, and also identified with the Italic Liber), represented not only the intoxicating power of wine, but also its social and beneficent influences, and the vital energies expressed in the growth of trees and vines. He was viewed as the promoter of civilization, a lawgiver, and lover of peace — as well as the patron deity of both agriculture and the theater.

Among his many titles were Firstborn (Protogonos), Fire-born, Roarer (Bromios), Twy-form (Diphues), Rain Giver, Flowery (Antheus), Fruity (Karpios), Black Footed, Two-Mothered (Bimater), and Torn Asunder (Sparagmos).
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Icona Today in Aleister Crowley's life

April 23:

  • 1906 - Arrives at Nagasaki. Writes to Elaine Simpson. "A.'. fair to good."
 
 
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