Weiser Antiquarian Books Catalog # 74: Aleister Crowley

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Weiser Antiquarian Books Catalog # 74

Aleister Crowley

A Selection of New, Used and Rare Books

Welcome to this, the seventy-fourth of our on-line catalogs, which is another of our special lists devoted to books by and about Aleister Crowley. The catalog is divided into four subsections, the first of which is made up of a select group of new books, comprising The Mystical & Magical System of the A.’. A.’. and 776 1/2 Tables of Correspondences for Practical Ceremonial, both by James A. Eshelman, Aleister Crowley. The Fire and the Force by Don Webb, copies of the leather bound limited edition of Jane Wolfe: The Cefalu Diaries 1920-1923, edited by David Shoemaker, and signed copies of the revised second edition of James & Nancy Wasserman’s, To Perfect This Feast. A Commentary on Liber XV. The Gnostic Mass.

The second section is devoted to Rare and Unusual Books and Ephemera relating to Crowley. Without doubt the most outstanding item is a copy of the quarter leather limited edition (only 20 copies issued) of Crowley’s Olla. An Anthology complete with original manuscript material loosely inserted. The book has a particularly interesting history, in that it was given as a gift to long-term Thelemite Helen Parsons Smith by renowned musician (and Crowley-collector) Jimmy Page. Other books in this section include Helen Parsons Smith’s copy of the extremely rare booklet An Open Letter to Lord Beaverbrook (1924), a very unusual issue of The Fun of the Fair (1942), a First Edition of The Mother’s Tragedy, and two copies of The Equinox, Volume III, No. 1, colloquially known as “The Blue Equinox” (1919), one being perhaps the cleanest copy that we have ever had, and the other solid, but undeniably grubby. This subsection is particularly strong in ephemera: it includes several signed examples of “The Word of the Equinox” and a number of really quite fascinating and charming documents in Crowley’s handwriting. These include a note on a rent bill, in which Crowley accuses his landlady of being “typical of a dipsomaniac drug-addict, also ambitious to commit crimes …,” a list of errands in which Crowley instructs his disciple J. G. Bayley to procure, amongst other things, the “ugliest, vulgarest, dirtiest birthday or greeting card you can find,” and an “up-to-date Latin Grammar,” and a scathing letter to a printer, which Crowley ends with the words “Yours, really concerned about your future in the workhouse infirmary, Aleister Crowley.”

The third section of the catalog comprises a selection of works – some signed – that were written and/or published by J. Edward Cornelius, well known on account of his own writings, and as a teacher and the publisher and editor of the Thelemic journal Red Flame. The fourth and final section, is A Miscellany of Secondhand, Rare, and Out-of-Print Books relating to Crowley. It includes a number of important texts such as the Commentaries on the Holy Books and Other Papers, The Equinox Volume IV, Number 1 (1996), the Magical and Philosophical Commentaries on the Book of the Law (1974), The Holy Books of Thelema. The Equinox Volume III, Number 9 (1983) etc. etc., as well as some more unusual pieces such as the issue of True. The Man’s Magazine, for October, 1956, which contains Daniel P. Mannix’s essay “[The] Wickedest Man in the World.” This essay (from which the illustration above and the breathless title to the right are borrowed) was later expanded by Mannix into his “trash paperback” biography of Crowley, The Beast, a copy of which is also included.

How about this for some example items?…

Aleister Crowley, Olla. An Anthology of Sixty Years of Song. With signed original manuscript materials loosely inserted. London: The O.T.O., 1946. Limited Edition, Hardcover, Large Quarto, [ii] + 128 + [ivpp blanks] One of a special edition of twenty copies ‘for the author and his helpers’ printed on mould-made paper, and bound in quarter-leather with papered boards with Egyptian motif by Sangorski & Sutcliffe as was “The Book of Thoth.” Although some copies of this special edition were signed, this was not specified in the limitation, and this copy is not signed. Top edge gilt, other edges untrimmed, gilt title down spine, frontis portrait of Crowley by Augustus John, Frieda Harris designed dustjacket from the Trade Edition bound in at rear.
Includes loosely inserted, three important pieces of ephemera:
a) A two page holograph manuscript of the “Table of Contents” for Olla, neatly penned by Crowley. Obviously an early draft. It contains significant differences to the published version. Written in black ink on the rectos only on two sheets of 6″ x 9″ mould made paper.
b) “Olla – Apologia.” A three page holograph manuscript, signed, of the text of the preface to “Olla.” The lack of corrections suggests that this is almost certainly a fair copy made by Crowley for the typist or typesetter. It is signed large at the end “Aleister Crowley” with his “phallic A” signature. On the rectos only of three sheets of blue-grey 8″ x 10″ light-weight airmail type paper.
c) A postcard-sized reproduction of the Augustus John frontispiece to “Olla.” Crowley had these printed for his personal use around the time of the publication of the book. Verso is blank.

“Olla” is Crowley’s own selection of his best poetry, and the last of his books to be published during his lifetime. In addition to this edition de-luxe there was a ‘standard’ edition limited to 500 copies, bound in brown (and sometimes dark green) cloth with dustjacket.
Although not marked as such, this particular copy was a gift from Jimmy Page, founder and member of Led Zeppelin, to Helen Parsons Smith, bookseller and publisher, in thanks for her help in his acquisition of rare Crowleyana. Helen Parsons Smith (1910-2003), was also a IXth degree member of the O.T.O, long term member of Agape Lodge of the O.T.O. in California, former wife of Jack Parsons and W. T. Smith, founder of Thelema Publications, and for over fifty years a quiet but constant presence in the development of Thelema in the United States.
The boards have a little shelfwear, with the extremes of the points rubbed and lightly bumped. Edges a little rubbed, as are head and tail of spine. Otherwise a solid, attractive VG+ copy of a magnificent and scarce book. It comes in a recent custom-made matching quarter-leather clamshell protective box, especially commissioned from Sangorski & Sutcliffe, the same company that did the original binding (the clamshell is fine save for two light scratches on the front). (38375) SOLD

[Aleister Crowley, – related material]. A single page typed receipt, on Estate Agents’ letterhead, for the rent on Aleister Crowley’s apartment in Gr. Ormond Street, dated August 1936. A single sheet of Real Estate Agent’s letterhead (approx. 8″ x 10″) , typed on the recto only.
The receipt details the rent paid for a two week period on Crowley’s apartment in 59 Gt. Ormond St., in August 1936, and acknowledging it’s payment. The receipt is made out to Pearl Brooksmith from the estate agent, A. E. Woodford, who has formalised it by affixing a stamp to it, over which he has signed his name. Brooksmith was for a time in the 1930s Crowley’s “Scarlet Woman” and sometimes financial benefactor, although he also used her name for business matters, as following his bankruptcy he was forbidden from seeking credit. Crowley memorialised her with an “Epitaph” not long after their first sexual encounter (“Here lies a Pearl of women, Who lived in open sin. One end collected semen, The other guzzled gin”) as well as some other even more unsavory verse.
The receipt has the usual creases from having been folded in an envelope, but otherwise is in Very Good condition. An unusual curio of one of the less well-known of Crowley’s “Scarlet Women.” (38358) $90.00

[Aleister Crowley]. A double-sided autograph letter, signed, in which Crowley remonstrates with a printer over his refusal to publish one of his poems. He closes with: “Yours, really concerned about your future in the workhouse infirmary, Aleister Crowley.” 1942. Written on a single sheet of cheap note-paper, (approx. 5 1/2″ x 8 1/2″). Crowley’s then address: 10 Hanover Sq., W.1. and the date “6-3-42 e.v.” written at the top of the page. Signed with a large, full signature “Aleister Crowley,” (a somewhat bulbous version of the “phallic A” signature).
A delightful piece of Crowleyan vitriol. Hughes ran Apex, a printers in Monmouth St, central London, just up from the “Seven Dials.” Apex had printed a number of small pieces for Crowley from late 1939 onwards, starting with the rather opulent “Temperance, A Tract for the Times,” and including several issues of “Liber Oz.” According to Crowley’s diaries, Hughes called on him on March 4th, 1942, and collected payment for the remaining 26 copies of “Temperance, A Tract for the Times.” At the same time Crowley gave Hughes the text of “Landed Gentry” – a rather scathing poem mocking the well-heeled buffoons who filled many of Britain’s senior political and administrative posts – and asked him to give a quote on printing it.
The following day Hughes returned the text, telling Crowley he couldn’t print it, as it was libellous. Crowley responded with this letter. In it he lambasted Hughes for his ignorance of the law, observing “Firstly, no person is name or indicated in any way. Who is going to start what you very vulgarly, call a ‘court case’? Secondly, political abuse is not libel. Thirdly who has been damaged by these attacks? .. [etc. etc.]” After several more comments about the poor printer’s ignorance Crowley ends with a flourish: “Yours, really concerned about your future in the workhouse infirmary, Aleister Crowley.” While Crowley’s points were technically correct, war-time censorship in Britain was incredibly strict, and although not libelous, printers were fearful of publishing anything that might be considered as against the government, and thus “unpatriotic.”
Crowley was consequently unable to find another printer that would produce either “Landed Gentry” or another poem that he had written attacking the establishment: “Political Vote. B—-y Secret.” Eventually he took them both to a small jobbing printer (the 1940s equivalent of a modern “copy-shop”) in the Quadrant Arcade behind Piccadilly Circus, who made duplicated copies of them from the typescript. Crowley then had these tipped into the rear of some copies of his “The Fun of the Fair” which he published in December 1942 [See the item immediately below]. Not surprisingly, the cheap jobbing printer’s paper, stands in stark contrast to the luxurious mould-made paper of the rest of the book! The letter is a classic of Crowleyan hyperbole and bombast.
It is written on thin, cheap paper, so the writing on each side shows through slightly to the other. A few creases and a pin-head sized hole. Still an attractive and interesting letter. (38367) $800.00

Aleister Crowley, The Fun of the Fair (Nijni Novgorod, 1913 e.v.). London: The O.T.O., 1942. First Edition thus. Original thick paper wrappers. Large 8vo. viii + 24pp (+ ivpp). Frontis portrait. Printed at the Chiswick Press on fine mold-made paper. This edition limited to 200 signed and numbered copies. This copy is numbered but NOT signed.
Crowley’s reminiscences – in verse – of the bawdy spectacle of the great festival at Nijni Novgorod (Russia) which he visited in 1913. Errata slip tipped onto half-title. This copy also includes two additional poems – “Political Vote. B—-y Secret” & “Landed Gentry” tipped in at the rear. Crowley had tried to get these poems, both of which are critical of “the establishment,” included in the body of the book, but had been rebuffed by several printers who feared that they would be prosecuted for publishing anything that might be considered anti-government propaganda under the strict wartime censorship laws. Eventually Crowley hit upon the ploy of having a mainstream printer – his old favourite the Chiswick Press – produce the books, and having the “dubious poems” duplicated by a jobbing printer (the 1940’s equivalent of a copy-shop). He then had the extra poems tipped into the rear of some of the copies of the books. Generally the extra poems are only found in the copies that were distributed in Britain during Crowley’s lifetime (which were also normally signed by him). Those copies that remained unsold at the time of his death, and most of those sent for the distribution in America, generally did not include the poems, in the latter instance because he was probably concerned that they might be stopped by customs and seized. Unusually, although this copy is unsigned – and was most likely part of a batch sent to his followers in the US – it does include the tipped in poems.
The overlapping wrappers are slightly creased around the edges as always, otherwise fine. (33544) $600.00

[Aleister Crowley – related material]. A bill for rent due, with a long holograph note by Crowley suggesting that it is the work of a “dipsomaniac drug-addict” etc. etc. 1942. A page from a printed, ruled, receipt book (approx. 5″ x 4″).
The page is dated 18 September 1942 and made out to Crowley for one month’s rent, at six pounds. No other details are given. Below this Crowley has written: “Very interesting: typical of a dipsomaniac drug-addict, also ambitious to commit crimes, and persuade every one she knows to join her in such pursuits. Her schemes are impracticable to the point of lunacy. But this script is valuable evidence on the doubtful–is she a schizophrenic?” Written on the verso, in pencil, twice, is the name “Hogg.” We know from Crowley’s diaries that around this time he had met and stayed in the house of one Deborah Hogg, wife of a General Hogg, whom he tried to interest in Amrita and other ventures, and about whom he wrote some most uncomplimentary passages in his diary, so the receipt may be from her. However Crowley did not have a fixed residence around that time, and seems to have stayed in a number of hotels, so it may relate to another place and landlady (official or otherwise). A typical Crowleyan barb.
Creases from folding, otherwise VG. (38372) $350.00

[Aleister Crowley]. A postcard of the Great Western Royal Hotel with a few with short notes re. Thomas [Driberg], H. L. Mencken, [Gerald] Yorke and Pearl [Brooksmith] in Crowley’s handwriting on the reverse (c. Jan. 1938). ND. A buff coloured postcard. The recto has a photograph and address details of the Great Western Royal Hotel, Paddington Station.
On the verso Crowley has written a few notes to himself: “(Mercury symbol) Tom” [shorthand for Wednesday, Tom Driberg?], “Write Mencken & Send Book,” “Phi [Greek letter – used by Crowley as an abbreviation for “phone”] Yorke,” [illegible word], “6pm Pearl [Brooksmith: his “Scarlet Woman” of the time]. Obviously just a scrap intended to remind Crowley of meetings etc.
Discolored patch across the front of the card. Otherwise VG. (38374) SOLD

Aleister Crowley, A double-sided typed document, signed, announcing the ‘Word of the Equinox’ for September 1945. The document is typed on both sides of a single sheet of off-white note paper (7″ x 51/4″) headed with the O.T.O. lamen (pyramid, dove and chalice). To the left of the lamen is typed ”Ex Castro Nemoris Inferioris’ (ie Crowley’s home at Netherwood), to the right are typed the year and date in Thelemic/astrological terms. The document is addressed ‘Care Frater’ (Dear Brother) – in this case it was sent to Roy Leffingwell, a IXo member of Agape Lodge. The document begins and ends with the full Thelemic greetings and comprises about eighty words of text, giving the ‘Word of the Equinox’: Rotara, the Abramelin square from which it is taken, the ‘oracle,’ and the ‘Omen.’ The document is elaborately signed by Crowley as “To Mega Therion 666” (In Greek – that is the “Great Wild Beast 666”) / 9o = 2o A.’. A.’.
The Word of The Equinox was a sort of oracular password sent out by Crowley to all in the A.’. A.’. of Neophyte grade and above, and certain O.T.O. members. It was changed twice a year at the spring and autumn equinoxes, and was a sort of divine portent, usually received by bibliomancy, but sometimes by vision or “direct voice.”
There is a single neat fold down the center from having been placed in an envelope, and a few small marks, one of which looks like tea a splash, the others a couple of small brown age spots, otherwise VG+ condition. (32231) SOLD0

Aleister Crowley, The Equinox, Volume III, No. 1. (“The Blue Equinox”) Detroit, Michigan: Universal Publishing Company, 1919. First edition. Hardcover. Oversize octavo. Rubricated title page. 308 + 132pp. (+ viii pp adverts.) Color frontis portrait of Crowley by Leon Engers Kennedy, and color reproduction of Crowley’s painting May Morn, plus 5 black and white plates, all with original captioned tissue guards. Blue buckram with red eye in triangle design on front board, red titling etc. to front board and spine.
Crowley was the editor and principal author of most of the “The Equinox” series, which contained a variety of poetry, fiction, and reviews – generally with esoteric themes – alongside a number of articles of occult instruction. The “Blue Equinox” – as this number became known – was arguably the last of the “real” Equinoxes to be published during Crowley’s lifetime. He continued to use the volume and number designations of the Equinox series, but for what were effectively separate monographs, quite different in most respects to the original journals. This volume includes five black and white photographic portraits, as well as color reproductions of Crowley’s painting “May Morn” and the color portrait of him by Leon Engers Kennedy. The text comprises a number of magical books (“Libers”) amongst which Liber LXV, Crowley’s Gnostic Catholic Mass, the publication of which caused considerable outcry, and calls for the “Blue Equinox” to be banned, as well as providing inspiration to James Branch Cabell who adapted part of it for use in his equally-contentious, but best-selling novel, “Jurgen.” Blavatsky’s “The Voice of Silence” with Crowley’s commentary is appended as a “special supplement” and other texts include Crowley’s “Hymn to Pan,” various book reviews, etc. etc.
Recently professionally rebacked, that is the cloth hinges have been renewed and original backstrip laid down: the gutter of each board is all that shows of the repair). Cloth darkened and discoloured – particularly at spine and outer edges of boards, boards bumped & rubbed at edges. Endpapers unevenly browned, adhesive residue on front pastedown from bookplate (no longer present), pages browned with some light scattered foxing. Dampmark (tidemark) to lower half of most pages, some light corresponding ripple to pages. Still a solid Good + copy, which includes the often-lacking tissues guards, some of which bear a substantial amount of printed text. (38164) $350.00

Aleister Crowley, The Equinox, Volume III, No. 1. (“The Blue Equinox”) Detroit, Michigan: Universal Publishing Company, 1919. First edition. Hardcover. Oversize octavo. Rubricated title page. 308 + 132pp. (+ viii pp adverts.) Color frontis portrait of Crowley by Leon Engers Kennedy, and color reproduction of Crowley’s painting May Morn, plus 5 black and white plates, all with original captioned tissue guards. Blue buckram with red eye in triangle design on front board, red titling etc. to front board and spine.
Crowley was the editor and principal author of most of the “The Equinox” series, which contained a variety of poetry, fiction, and reviews – generally with esoteric themes – alongside a number of articles of occult instruction. The “Blue Equinox” – as this number became known – was arguably the last of the “real” Equinoxes to be published during Crowley’s lifetime. He continued to use the volume and number designations of the Equinox series, but for what were effectively separate monographs, quite different in most respects to the original journals. This volume includes five black and white photographic portraits, as well as color reproductions of Crowley’s painting “May Morn” and the color portrait of him by Leon Engers Kennedy. The text comprises a number of magical books (“Libers”) amongst which Liber LXV, Crowley’s Gnostic Catholic Mass, the publication of which caused considerable outcry, and calls for the “Blue Equinox” to be banned, as well as providing inspiration to James Branch Cabell who adapted part of it for use in his equally-contentious, but best-selling novel, “Jurgen.” Blavatsky’s “The Voice of Silence” with Crowley’s commentary is appended as a “special supplement” and other texts include Crowley’s “Hymn to Pan,” various book reviews, etc. etc.
Cloth very lightly mottled, a little light rubbing to the edges, endpapers unevenly browned, pencil marks to less than a dozen pages – easily erased otherwise contents bright and fresh. Overall, a solid unusually nice VG+ copy, which includes the tissue guards, some of which bear a substantial amount of printed text. Probably the nicest copy of the Blue Equinox that we have seen in 20 years – and as Crowley specialists we’ve seen quite a few. (38165) $850.00

Aleister Crowley, The Mother’s Tragedy. [London]: Privately Printed, 1901. First Edition. Hardcover. 8vo xii + 112pp . Original quarter cloth – white backstrip with blue-grey papered boards. Paper title label on spine.
Crowley wrote of that the love lyrics in this collection: “treat love not as an object in itself, but on the contrary, as a dragon ready to devour and one less than St. George.’ Poems include ‘The Whore in Heaven,’ ‘The Lesbian Hell,’ ‘The Summit of the Amorous Mountain,’ etc. This First edition was published in an edition of 500 copies in 1901, but it seems highly likely that only a small number of copies were actually bound up, and that the rest of the sheets were used as the basis for the later ‘new edition’ which Crowley released under his S.P.R.T. – Society for the Propagation of Religious Truth – imprint (the name being a none-too-subtle jest at the expense of the the well known Christian publishing house the S.P.C.K. – Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge). Thus this edition is quite scarce.
Linen spine a little discoloured and darkened and discolored as always, paper title label 98 % complete (unusually so). Boards lightly discolored around edges, corners a little bumped. Contemporary bookplate of A.W.K. Straton, endpages unevenly browned and some moderate foxing. Otherwise a solid, unmarked VG+ copy. (35582) $700.00

Aleister Crowley, The “Word of the Equinox” for September 1944. A single page typed document, announcing the “Word of the Equinox” for September 1944. The document is typewritten on one side of a single sheet of off-white note paper (7″ x 51/4″) headed with the Sevenfold Star of the Beast printed in red. To the left of the Star is typed ‘Astonii Clintoni Castro’ (ie Crowley’s home at The Bell Inn, Aston Clinton, Bucks), to the right the year and date in Thelemic/astrological terms. The document is addressed ‘Care Frater’ (Dear Brother) – in this case it was sent to Roy Leffingwell, a IXo member of Agape Lodge. The document begins and ends with the full Thelemic greetings and comprises a dozen short lines of text, giving the ‘Word of the Equinox’: Bikelon, the Abramelin square from which it is taken, the ‘oracle,’ and the ‘Omen.’ It is unsigned.
The Word of The Equinox was a sort of oracular password sent out by Crowley to all in the A.’. A.’. of Neophyte grade and above, and certain O.T.O. members. It was changed twice a year at the spring and autumn equinoxes, and was a sort of divine portent, usually received by bibliomancy, but sometimes by vision or “direct voice.”
There is a single neat fold down the center from having been placed in an envelope, and a few small pin holes in the top left corner. A few small marks, overall VG + condition. (32229) $300.00

Aleister Crowley, The “Word of the Equinox” for March 1947. A single-sided typed document, signed, announcing the “Word of the Equinox” for March 1947. The document is typed on one side of a single sheet of off-white note paper (7″ x 51/4″) headed with the Sevenfold Star of the Beast printed in red. To the left of the Star is typed ”Ex Castro Nemoris Inferioris’ (ie Crowley’s home at Netherwood), to the right is typed the year and date in Thelemic/astrological terms. Above this is written ‘Spring 1947’ in an unknown hand. This particular example was clearly sent to one of Crowley’s female followers, as the word “Frater” in the type-written greeting “Care Frater” (“Dear Brother”), has been crossed out, and the word “Soror” (“sister”) inserted in holograph in its place. The document begins and ends with the full Thelemic greetings and comprises about twenty words of text, giving the “Word of the Equinox”: ‘lift,” the “oracle,” and the “Omen.” The document has a couple of manuscript corrections in Crowley’s hand, and is elaborately – if slightly shakily – signed by him as “To Mega Therion 666 9 = 2 A.’. A.’. ” This was the penultimate “Word” Crowley: died just over eight months later, on December 1, 1947. The “Word of the Equinox” documents that Crowley issued for Spring 1947 were also the last such announcements to actually be signed by Crowley himself. Although he did receive “the Word” for Autumn 1947 (“brilliance”) and a few copies were sent out, Crowley was too ill to sign them personally (he died some two months later) and they were signed on his behalf by a secretary (who in the examples seen, managed to omit the “666” from his title “To Mega Therion 666”).
“The Word of The Equinox” was a sort of oracular password sent out by Crowley to all in the A.’. A.’. of Neophyte grade and above, and certain O.T.O. members. It was changed twice a year at the spring and autumn equinoxes, and was a sort of divine portent, usually received by bibliomancy, but sometimes by vision or “direct voice.”
There is a single neat fold down the center from having been placed in an envelope, and a tiny marks, still near Fine condition. (32233) $1150.00

[Aleister Crowley]. “Your Interest In Magick should be the Dawn of a New Life” [a leaflet]. NP [London]: Privately Printed, ND (circa 1934) . First edition. A single quarto sheet ( 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches), printed on both sides. The leaflet is untitled, but the first line of text reads ‘Your Interest In Magick should be the Dawn of a New Life.” The upper half of the recto is taken up by a photograph of Crowley in Middle Eastern dress, standing with arms spread in front of an ancient building. Below this are nine lines of text. The verso has a further sixteen lines of text.
Although sometimes found with copies of Magick in Theory and Practice (Book 4, Part IV, published in 1929/1930) the leaflet was apparently issued later in the 1930s from England. The address – 9 Carlos Place Grosvenor Square – is that given by Crowley at the time of the Nina Hamnett libel action (April 1934) so the leaflet was presumably issued around then. The text of the leaflet invites those interested in Magick, Crowley’s creed of Thelema, or discovering their own “true will” to make contact with him.
A little darkened at the edges, otherwise a VG+ copy. (38318) $175.00

[Aleister Crowley]. A sheet of note paper with holograph notes by Crowley on the symbolism and gematria of the words Taro, Tarot and Azoth. Circa 1941. Written on the recto only of a single sheet of “Abermill Bond” watermarked note-paper (approx. 5 1/4″ x 7″). The text is written in black ink, with “Written out for Press” scrawled in pencil across the bottom.
Crowley’s notes on the gematria and symbolism of the words Taro, Tarot and Azoth. Crowley was evidently not particulary happy with what he had written about “Tarot” – which he has struck through – but was clearly pleased with his ideas on “Taro” as next to them he has written “This is an A.1. reading.” Undated, but almost certainly from the early 1940s, when he was working on “The Book of Thoth” and the tarot deck with Frieda Harris.
An interesting curiosity associated with Crowley’s most significant publications. (38368) SOLD

[Aleister Crowley]. An amusing and revealing holograph list of errands which Crowley prepared for his disciple J. G. Bayley to undertake on his behalf. December 1 [1943]. Written on both sides of a single sheet of tall, narrow, note-paper, (approx. 8″ x 3 1/4″).
A charming list – Crowley details six errands that he wishes Bayley to do for him. They included delivering a message and making telephone enquiries, shopping: “Old Compton St. (shop on N. side) Get ugliest, vulgarest, dirtiest birthday or greeting card you can find,” “try shops for up-to-date Latin Grammar ….. try Marks and Watkins for the Equinox No. V,” searching out Shetland cloth (the preferred material for his suits), and delivering “shoes, slippers and a pouch” to a shop (possibly for repair?). In an unusual demonstration of kindness, Crowley also instructs Bayley to find one William Churchill (possibly the photographer Crowley used on occasion) and “give him packets of cigarettes, make sure that he is looking after himself properly; help him if required.” An interesting testament to the day to day concerns of “the Beast.”
One fold across centre, otherwise VG. (38370) $400.00

Norman Mudd [& Aleister Crowley], An Open Letter to Lord Beaverbrook. Paris: NP, [Privately Printed] , ND [1924]. First Edition. Small octavo, 16pp., stapled booklet. Issued without wrappers.
Ostensibly written by Crowley’s chief disciple of the time, Norman Mudd, there is no doubt that Crowley collaborated – and most likely co-wrote – the text. It is an appeal to British newspaper publisher Lord Beaverbrook for fair play in his papers’ treatment of Crowley – against whom they were then running an intense “smear campaign.” Amongst the scarcer of the Crowley booklets. (Yorke 105).
From the library of Helen Parsons Smith (1910 – 2003). Parsons Smith, was ex-wife of Jack Parsons and W. T. Smith, long time member of Agape Lodge of the O.T.O., and founder of Thelema Publications. The booklet is loosely enclosed in a specially-made set of modern blue cloth boards, with gilt titling to the front cover and spine, which Parsons Smith had made as a protective outer cover. Tiny chip (smaller than a match head) in fore-edge margin of first leaf, otherwise an exceptionally clean, near-Fine copy. (32431) $650.00

Aleister Crowley, The “Word of the Equinox” for March 1934. A two-sided typed document in secretarial hand, signed by Crowley, announcing the ‘Word of the Equinox’ for March 1934. Written in black in a lavish, unidentified hand on both sides of a single sheet of thick, quality paper (10″ x 6 1/2″) Headed with “An. I, 8,” and the astrological symbols for Sol in Aries. The document is addressed “Care Frater,” and begins and ends with the full Thelemic greetings. It comprises about fifty words of text including the “Word of the Equinox,” the “oracle,” and the “Omen.” The “Word of the Equinox” given is Kermuth (“Vineyards, adds to 666”), with the Hebrew letters Kaph, Resh, Mem, Vau and Tau, written in large bold script in purple ink. The handwriting is not known, but it appears feminine and it seems quite likely that it is that of Crowley’s ‘Scarlet Woman’ of the time, Pearl Brooksmith. The document is signed by Crowley his full signature “To Mega Therion 666 9 = 2 A.’. .’. ” in bold letters.
The Word of The Equinox was a sort of oracular password sent out by Crowley to all in the A.’. A.’. of Neophyte grade and above, and certain O.T.O. members. It was changed twice a year at the spring and autumn equinoxes, and was a sort of divine portent, usually received by bibliomancy, but sometimes by vision or ‘direct voice.’
A few light creases from having been folded into an envelope, otherwise near Fine condition. (32239) SOLD

P. R. Stephensen [in collaboration with Aleister Crowley]. The Legend of Aleister Crowley. A Study of the Facts. London: Mandrake Press Limited, 1930. First Edition. Softcover. 8vo. 158 pp. Original blue-grey wrappers.
Stephensen’s fascinating study of the press attacks on Crowley in the 1920s. Crowley collaborated on the work, and his then-secretary, Israel Regardie, assembled the clippings from which Stephensen drew the text. It is a book almost never encountered in VG condition because of the cheap production values.
The spine and outer margins of the wrappers are darkened & discolored (as usual), spine creased with some chipping at upper end and about an inch and a half loss at lower spine, corners bumped causing light creasing. Paper browned, faint blue marks in margin of one page – othewise text clean. Overall a Good copy. (38203) $150.00

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