Author: lashtal

Science and sex cults: rocketeer Jack Parsons hits the small screen | The Guardian

Making a television show is grueling, expensive and time-consuming, but it isn’t rocket science. Sometimes, though, as Mark Heyman points out, it’s pretty darn close. Heyman is referring to Strange Angel, a new series about the bizarre life of Jack Parsons, known in aeronautical circles as the father of modern day rocketry and to others as the Thelemite occultist who crossed paths with self-proclaimed prophet Aleister Crowley and Scientology founder L Ron Hubbard.

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Strange Angel Review: Jack Parsons Gets TV Treatment on CBS All Access – Variety

The story of Jack Parsons — the very real rocket scientist upon which “Strange Angel” is based — is a bizarre combination of ego and ambition that quite literally blew up in his face, when a chemical experiment exploded and killed him in 1952 when he was just 37 years old. Parsons was fascinated by all things considered fantastical, whether that be traveling to the moon or the Los Angeles occult scene that eventually became his stomping grounds. His life intersected in weird and fascinating ways with legendary figures like famed occultist Aleister Crowley and Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. As his biographer George Pendle puts it, “By day he built rockets for the government, by night he emerged from a coffin to perform sex magic with his followers.”

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Jason Louv: John Dee and the Empire of Angels

Presenting a comprehensive overview of Dee’s life and work, Louv examines his scientific achievements, intelligence and spy work, imperial strategizing, and Enochian magick, establishing a psychohistory of John Dee as a singular force and fundamental driver of Western history. Exploring Dee’s influence on Sir Francis Bacon, the development of modern science, 17th-century Rosicrucianism, the 19th-century occult revival, and 20th-century occultists such as Jack Parsons, Aleister Crowley, and Anton LaVey, Louv shows how John Dee continues to impact science and the occult to this day.

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Black magic ruin Boleskine House placed on a list of historic buildings under threat | HeraldScotland

A REMOTE ruin once owned by a notorious occultist dubbed “the wickedest man in the world” has been placed on a list of historic buildings under threat. Boleskine House, which sits on the south-east shore of Loch Ness, was reduced to a burnt-out shell when a fierce blaze ripped through the property in 2015. It was previously the home of infamous “black magician” Aleister Crowley, who scandalised British society in the early 20th century through his experiments with sex, drugs and the occult.
The C-listed manor was later bought by Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, who said: “Strange things have happened in that house which have nothing to do with Crowley. The bad vibes were already there.” Historic Environment Scotland confirmed Boleskine House had now been placed on the Buildings at Risk Register, a comprehensive database of architecturally or historically important structures considered under threat.

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