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lashtal
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Thanks to Michael Staley for the link: http://www.southwark.gov.uk/info/200162/the_cuming_museum/1607/forthcoming_exhibitons

Austin Osman Spare: Fallen Visionary

Tuesday 14 September 2010 to Saturday 13 November 2010

The fascinating rise and fall of Austin Osman Spare, who lived and worked in Southwark in the early twentieth century, is charted in a new exhibition this Autumn at the Cuming Museum.

Austin Osman Spare's choice of dream-like, magical themes, his sometimes disturbing imagery and his other-worldly life and attitude have meant his work has both admirers and detractors.

But he was also a fine and much-admired draughtsman and figurative artist, and left a fascinating visual record of his Southwark neighbours and acquaintances.

Spare rejected much of the art establishment of the time and followed his own path, despite an early promise of fame and fortune.

This made him an outsider in the art world but his life and work continue to inspire new generations of artists, musicians and writers.

The exhibition will feature Spare's work from the Southwark Art Collection and loans from many private and institutional collectors. It will be the largest showcase of his work in a public museum since his death in 1956.

The exhibition is being curated by Stephen Pochin and Chris Jordan in conjunction with the Cuming Museum.

To accompany the exhibition, there will be a series of fascinating talks by renowned speakers, private views and other activities. A final list of events will be published on the events pages in August.

For further information please contact the Cuming Museum on 020 752 52332 or email: cuming.museum@southwark.gov.uk

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 Anonymous
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Unfortunately I will be in Japan, but my mother has promised to make an appearance for me (she's a recent convert to the works of AOS).

"It will be the largest showcase of his work in a public museum since his death in 1956."

Wow, I really wish I could be there! Does anyone know if there will be a catalogue published for this collection?


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Michael Staley
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"darkflame" wrote:
Wow, I really wish I could be there! Does anyone know if there will be a catalogue published for this collection?

Yes, there will be a catalogue.

The exhibition will I hope include the dozen or so Spares held by the South London Gallery, some of which are superb. Foremost for me is Theurgy, a 1929 drawing reproduced as b/w in Gavin Semple's Zos-Kia.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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 Anonymous
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Indeed, Theurgy will be the centrepiece of this substantial retrospective. There are also 16 self-portraits ('By Hisself').
In total, there will be 80 works on show. Plus diverse items in cabinet displays. Not to be missed...

Apologies for the conflicting details regarding the build of the deluxe edition of 'Cockney Visionary'.
To clarify, it will have quarter-bound morocco with cloth sides. These will be in burgundy moiréd silk.

A shot of the book with dust-jacket and along with presentation insert and the DVD jacket may be seen here:

http://jerusalempress.co.uk/?page_id=22

By the way, they're going like... hot books!

Istaban, for and on behalf of Jerusalem Press


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 Anonymous
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Are copies still likely to be available for purchase at the exhibition itself? I'm not sure whether to order now, or just pick one up at the gallery.


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 Anonymous
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Best to subscribe to the Jerusalem Press email newsletter to receive further updates...


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James
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Any news on the talks to be given for this exhibition? I've had a look around the Southwark Website and can't see any listed..it might just be poor eyesight though..anyway would appreciate if anyone has any information.

Regards

Jamie


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imbas
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 Anonymous
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Hi
Haven't seen any news on this lately - take it it is still going ahead. Also does anyone know anything about a second London Spare exhibition that is rumoured to be taking place around that same time?
Thanks!


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Michael Staley
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"gjyn" wrote:
Haven't seen any news on this lately - take it it is still going ahead.

Yes, the exhibition is going ahead, opening 14th September. There's a link to the website earlier in this thread.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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christibrany
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I hope photographs are allowed, because for those of us that aren't able to go being overseas, it would be lovely to see artwork that maybe isn't in any of the current books. Especially his colour ones like the pastels, I adore those!
I have all 3 of Grant's AOS books: Images, Zos Speaks, Dearest V, and also 2 fulgurs Valley of fear and Ugly Ecstasy, plus all of his original works in the inferno to zos, but there are tonnes of paintings and pastels and drawings that are unpublished in collectors hands that hopefully this exhibition will show.

Which brings me to wonder, is there a listing anywhere of what will be shown at the show, title-wise?


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Michael Staley
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"christibrany" wrote:
Which brings me to wonder, is there a listing anywhere of what will be shown at the show, title-wise?

I've not heard of one being available before the opening on 14th September. I believe that a list of exhibit numbers and titles will be available at the exhibition.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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 Anonymous
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The Jerusalem press publication 'Cockney visionary', will include a full list of loaned works and also features many colour repros of same. There will also be a walk-around gallery checklist.

I have been involved in the installation and it looks truly wonderful. Over 80 works from all periods have been brought back to Southwark for this landmark show. The special feature is the wall of stunning self-portraits providing a poignant time-line of the artist from his early fame through to late adversity.

There's a reunion too for several of the 'local types' works. These were last alongside each other in the Temple Bar (Porters), 1949 and the Mansion House Tavern show, 1952.

There are also cabinet displays featuring the artist's books, with rare items including original ink drawings for Pickford Waller's bookplates, invites, pub catalogues, sketches and personal correspondence.

There is also a surprise appearance of the newly discovered Focus of Life folio, which is soon to be published by Fulgur.

So there are many captivating art works and some fascinating Sparian relics for you to justify a trip South of the River Thames...

http://www.southwark.gov.uk/info/200162/the_cuming_museum/1607/temporary_exhibitions/2

http://jerusalempress.co.uk/?page_id=20


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Anonymous
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Any chance this will travel to the US?


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michaelclarke18
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Given that it is a municipal exhibition - as opposed to a national one - I would say probably not.


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Michael Staley
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":)" wrote:
Any chance this will travel to the US?

I doubt it, personally. As Michael Clarke has said, it is a municipal exhibition rather than a national one.

In the first place, though, a museum or gallery in the USA would have to take on the cost and logistics of moving pictures over. In the second place, from the point of view of the lenders it is one thing to lend your pictures for a London location, quite another to have them transported across the world.

Many years ago I bought a 1954 pastel by Spare, 'Aida', which was then located in the USA. It came over by Fedex who are well used to such operations. Nonetheless, I was like a cat on hot bricks until the picture arrived safe and sound in my living room. That's just one picture; imagine if a dozen or so of your much-loved pictures were being flown across. Insurance doesn't enter into it; if you're lucky enough to have a Spare on your wall, there is an intense relationship with it.

Another point is of course that even were the exhibition to be taken over to the USA, it's a massive place and would almost certainly involve you in travelling to see it - I doubt that the interest in Spare would be high enough to justify the exhibition going on tour around the USA. It's probably easier for you to travel to London to see it here, in Southwark where Spare lived and worked.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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panpsyche
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Hi. Has anyone here had a chance to visit this exhibition? If so, care to share any thoughts/observations for those of us at a distance from London?


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Michael Staley
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I was hoping to visit this before flying out to Seattle, but alas was unable to. I'll have to wait until the first week of October, therefore.

Like panpsyche, I'd be interested to hear from anyone who has visited the exhibition, which I gather via an email from one of the organisers at the Cuming Museum in Southwark has had good numbers and has led to some interesting contacts with people in the area who knew Spare, at least one of them attending the art lessons he gave.

In addition, there's an interesting programme of talks and presentations in October concerning Spare.

Yours in the grip of atavistic nostalgias,

Michael.


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christibrany
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For those of us who cannot attent the exhibition I highly reccomend buying a copy of the programme/catalogue/book that is being released concurrently of the works shown with descriptions. I always love seeing new Spare works, so I will buy one soon. Although I haven't seen it yet based on the description the colour reproductions are well worth it.
Its not cheap but his work is priceless.
😀


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I was there last Saturday and was very impressed. The wall with the line of self portraits on it was good, and I liked the display case with the bookplates showing, especially the one with the ostrich. I have a peculiar facination with ostriches.

There's really loads on display, the exhibition list has 83 items on it, but that doesn't include all the items in the display cases.

The Imperial War Museums paintings are a bit high up so you can't scrutinise them, but they look rather fine none the less. And they're probably at the right hight for an ostrich to get a good look. Did I mention the bookplate with the ostrich on it? It's very good.


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James
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Down to Elephant & Castle on the Bakerloo line, through the labyrinth and out at the Pink Shopping Centre along past the dug up roundabout which used to house 56a Walworth Road, past the abandoned Heygate Housing Estate on to the Cuming Museum, up the steps, through the automatic door, sharp left and in to the Cloakroom area to the right along the corridor through the room with the Southwark chintz (ancient & modern), and into the AOS Fallen Visionary exhibition.

A whitewashed room configured in the following sections:

Self-portraits (along the right handside),
WWI portraits above the above
Mystical pictures on the far end wall - along to
Sidereal pictures (some Valley of Fearesque pix included),
these along the left hand side up to
Local portraits
A narrativeless video identifying WWI landscapes as possible sources for for some of the dreamscapes
the later pastel pictures (thanks to Mick Staley - must look good in the living room!), composites, atavistic visionary bold colour pix
and around to some bookplates you find yourself next to the entrance/exit again.
There are small islands away from the walls with his illustrated books, Satyrs, Anathama, Pleasure and some poignant horse pictures (horses for slaughter and an RSCA (sic) pic.

Go around two or three times, Evil genius, theurgy the local heads hardly make eye contact most looking as visionary as the artist's self. The colours still vivid, look close up, don't be put off by the odd reflection making looking at some pix a bit difficult.

Peruse the visitor's book before you go to see whose been already and add own scrib note.

Congratulate Stephen, Christopher and the Cuming Museum for an exhibition long overdue. If you can, support it and maybe they'll put it on again some time!!

Regards

Jamie


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christibrany
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I'm going to support it by buying their book. I hope it gets pressed soon.
Are there any photos allowed?


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lrlarue
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this is an excellent show altho hampered by the small space. So much to absorb.


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"lrlarue" wrote:
this is an excellent show altho hampered by the small space. So much to absorb.

Great news, can't wait to be in the UK again..
And thanks James for the resumè of your experience 😉


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James
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"christibrany" wrote:
Are there any photos allowed?

Whilst there I did see a woman taking photos whether this is official or not I could not say as museum staff were flitting in and out of the room and probably did not see her.

I did want to add that the wall of self portraits proved very effective AOS had quite a round face in middle age but the last portrait drawn in '55 showed considerable weight loss and on a bright blue background somewhat portentous at least with the benefit of hindsight.

J.


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panpsyche
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"James" wrote:
Down to Elephant & Castle on the Bakerloo line...

Thanks Jamie for sharing your visit!


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Michael Staley
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Yes, your account is vivid; thanks from me too. I've heard the accounts of others re the wall of self-portraits, and I'm greatly looking forward to seeing them. Although not able to visit the exhibition before whizzing across the pond, I was able to glimpse thumb-nails of some of the pictures, but of course it's no substitute for lingering amongst the pictures which I look forward to doing several times in October.

Yours from the angles of inbetweeness,

Michael.


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steve_wilson
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Don't forget that Atlantis Bookshop is holding a parallel exhibition of Spare material - downstairs - running for the same period as the Southwark Council one. Not surprisingly, the Atlantis works are more magically-orientated than most of the Southwark ones. There is a bus, the 174 I believe, that takes you directly from one to the other.


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Michael Staley
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"steve_wilson" wrote:
Don't forget that Atlantis Bookshop is holding a parallel exhibition of Spare material - downstairs - running for the same period as the Southwark Council one. Not surprisingly, the Atlantis works are more magically-orientated than most of the Southwark ones. There is a bus, the 174 I believe, that takes you directly from one to the other.

I find it difficult to imagine more "magically-oriented" pictures than for instance 'Theurgy' or 'Background of Prescience', just two of many such pictures in the Southwark exhibition.


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"steve_wilson" wrote:
Don't forget that Atlantis Bookshop is holding a parallel exhibition of Spare material - downstairs - running for the same period as the Southwark Council one. Not surprisingly, the Atlantis works are more magically-orientated than most of the Southwark ones. There is a bus, the 174 I believe, that takes you directly from one to the other.

93,
Cheers steve, will be checking out both very soon.

93 93/93


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 Anonymous
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I second Michael Staley's sentiment regarding 'Theurgy'. That's definately the magical jewel in the crown of the Southwark Collection. We were very lucky to to be able pair that up with 'Evil Genius' and also borrow 'Women with Crystal ball', what riches!

Regarding an early comment referring to the Cuming's permanent collection as 'chintz', I suggest you go back again and notice that it is nothing of the sort.

It is a 'cabinet of curiosities'. A collection that was once on par with Pitt Rivers and the Horniman museums. This is all that remains since the blitz. Prior to that Spare would have surely seen the cabinets in their glory (which from 1909 occupied the entire first floor of this building) with masks, votive objects, tribal wands and weapons, Meso-American figurines, talismans... So join the dots: consider the talismans, figurines and masks and then check out such works as Evil Genius, Veiled Women with Masks, etc.... context is everything.


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 Anonymous
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I was at the opening on Thursday. It was great to see a brilliant retrospective of his work. Having only one of his drawings and having only seen a handfull of his works in private collections and reproductions in books it was absolutey amazing to see them in the flesh. There really is a wealth of stuff here and a first hand chance to see briliant draftsmanship and skill up close. You do get a sense of the man with such a variety of his work on display and you cant help but see the surprisingly real magic in his sympathetic portraits. What is brilliant is the diversity, with examples in cases of book plates and books etc..

For me, the experience has completetly lead to a re-evaluation of his work, small flat repros and book plates do not do the man justice. You have to see the marks up close to really appreciate his thought process, eye and empathy. It was excellent to see the First World War works too, unfortunately due to space they were placed very high up above smaller self potraits, they are rare views indeed and deserve a better inspection. This is a good chance to see some of Geraldine Beskin's collection too of which she donated some of the local portraits and a large nude study, please check out Atlantis for more magical stuff. There are some key anon patron lends as well as the great works Southwark have.

Again, I cant recommend this exhibition enough for fans of Spare and great Art, oh and its free. Be sure to look out for The Culture Show feature. Thanks to Judy at Cumming and everyone involved .


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 Anonymous
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Lets not forget that there are currently two exhibitions of Spare in London public collections. The other is of course at the Imperial War Museum, Lambeth site. Just one tube stop away from the Cuming but easier to walk between the two sites. The IWM has four of the RAMC works in a small but rewarding contextual display. It includes possibly Spare's largest ever work (excluding Book of Pleasure!) an enormous pastel depicting the ruined cathedral at Ypres, Belgium.


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michaelclarke18
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For me, the experience has completetly lead to a re-evaluation of his work, small flat repros and book plates do not do the man justice

Austin Osman Spare used to be one of my favourite artists and I have always admired the truly incisive draftsmanship - and certainly his lifelong commitment to his work.
However, he is not without his weaknesses. One of the key deficiencies, in my view, is that Spare tends to illustrates his experiences rather than share or communicate them on any deeper level. There is very little by way of sensation or experience that the works communicate to me, other than the accomplished draftsmanship. Nor do I find the work inventive as images - Spare just makes me feel I am looking at a nicely executed illustration, rather than participating, or feeling, anything that relates to the experience more closely.


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 Anonymous
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michaelclarke18, with all due respect, i couldn't disagree with you more strongly!

but such is the effect of art upon individual consciousnesses!


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Michael Staley
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"michaelclarke18" wrote:
One of the key deficiencies, in my view, is that Spare tends to illustrates his experiences rather than share or communicate them on any deeper level. There is very little by way of sensation or experience that the works communicate to me, other than the accomplished draftsmanship. Nor do I find the work inventive as images - Spare just makes me feel I am looking at a nicely executed illustration, rather than participating, or feeling, anything that relates to the experience more closely.

This certainly isn't my experience of Spare's artwork. My favourites are the late pastels, and the 1955 picture 'Background of Prescience' is for me the epitome and maturation of Spare - so much so, that I'm basing my talk at the Cuming Museum this coming Saturday around that picture. I'd also instance the 1954 'Sacred and Profane' as communicating very well the fire of mystical ecstasy which burns behind the fabric of existence, breaking through from time to time. There is also the 1953 drawing 'Slipstream of Memory' which conveys vividly the sense that the ego is a fluctuating amalgam of intrusive shards of consciousness.

There are many more such pictures which I could instance. We all have our own opinions. Mine is that exquisite though Spare's draughtsmanship is, it is his ability not only to illustrate but also thereby to communicate divine ecstasy which really sets him apart. I find his work gorgeous and inspirational.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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michaelclarke18
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also thereby to communicate divine ecstasy which really sets him apart

Yes, I understand that, but it's just that I find the results rather mixed. For example, below is a link to an artist who in some ways is a contemporary of Spare's who was born 5 years before. Now, I know it isn't really fair to compare Spare to the best, but I think it's relevant to just illustrate the point.
The picture, called Weeping Woman, is a powerful visual expression of someone crying. Now rather than produce a delicate image that is beatifully drawn, the artist has chosen to employ a number of visual devices, some of them slightly crude, to get his point across; so the work really evokes the sensation of someone crying which is very, clearly felt.

I'm sure Spare had some pretty mysterious and magical experiences during his life, I'm just not sure the method he chose to express them was always the most effective - some of the 'magical' works I have seen would not look out of place in a JK Rowling book, which is a shame.


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Michael Staley
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"michaelclarke18" wrote:
Yes, I understand that, but it's just that I find the results rather mixed. For example, below is a link to an artist who in some ways is a contemporary of Spare's who was born 5 years before. Now, I know it isn't really fair to compare Spare to the best, but I think it's relevant to just illustrate the point.
The picture, called Weeping Woman, is a powerful visual expression of someone crying. Now rather than produce a delicate image that is beatifully drawn, the artist has chosen to employ a number of visual devices, some of them slightly crude, to get his point across; so the work really evokes the sensation of someone crying which is very, clearly felt.

I'm sure Spare had some pretty mysterious and magical experiences during his life, I'm just not sure the method he chose to express them was always the most effective - some of the 'magical' works I have seen would not look out of place in a JK Rowling book, which is a shame.

It's all opinion and personal choice, Michael. I like Picasso's work very much - in fact, 20th Century art is my favourite period/genre. Spare resonates more with me, Picasso with you. Not sure there's much to it apart from that. I take a lot from Rosetti's 'Beata Beatrix', whilst others might see little more there than chocolate box art.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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Michael Staley
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I went to visit the exhibition at the Cuming Museum this afternoon, and loved it. It's a very well balanced exhibition with great diversity. I particularly liked the early 1930s sidereals of film actresses, many of them of a haunting delicacy. I also particularly liked the self-portraits, again a fine diversity.

The Museum have a good collection of a dozen or so Spares which they have accumulated over the years. I particularly liked 'Theurgy' and 'Idolatror', both late 1920s, the former a favourite of mine since its publication in Gavin Semple's Zos Kia in the mid-1990s.

I'll be back several times more between now and the end of the exhibition in mid-November. In the meantime, congratulations to the organisers for their hard work in mounting such a great exhibition.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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einDoppelganger
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"MichaelStaley" wrote:
I take a lot from Rosetti's 'Beata Beatrix', whilst others might see little more there than chocolate box art.

I adore Rosetti's work. I understand how on first glance the Pre Raphaelites can appear trite but some of taht work is pure magic to me. I also find a lot in the work of the futurists.
The Symbolists are another huge interest. Odelon Redon is one of my favorites right now. I love an artist that communicate something so sinister with so much color. His work manages to be manic and brooding all at once for me. It takes it out of the realm of gothic pastiche and into a realm thats quite emotionally complex if you forgive my waxing all artsy 🙂 I aspire to capture something close to that one day.

in any case - to each their own.


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michaelclarke18
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Actually I visited the Spare exhibition in the Atlantis Bookshop. There are a number of pastels, a number of graphic prints and several drawings.

I think it confirms my view of Spare as purely an illustrator. Whilst technically, Spare rarely dissapoints, it's clear that in the work, there is very little visual sophistication, and the work communicates very little, aside from mundane appearances, about the entities he chooses to depict. Of course there are the sigils, but these are usually depicted as being something 'separate from' any particular entity and aren't integrated with other imagery in any visual or conceptual way that is remotely meaningful or even interesting.

A fairly banal exhibition, which makes it clear why - for the most part - the national collections have chosen to ignore Spare.


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Michael Staley
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"michaelclarke18" wrote:
Actually I visited the Spare exhibition in the Atlantis Bookshop. There are a number of pastels, a number of graphic prints and several drawings.

I think it confirms my view of Spare as purely an illustrator. Whilst technically, Spare rarely dissapoints, it's clear that in the work, there is very little visual sophistication, and the work communicates very little, aside from mundane appearances, about the entities he chooses to depict. Of course there are the sigils, but these are usually depicted as being something 'separate from' any particular entity and aren't integrated with other imagery in any visual or conceptual way that is remotely meaningful or even interesting.

A fairly banal exhibition, which makes it clear why - for the most part - the national collections have chosen to ignore Spare.

No, I don't think it does confirm your opinion of Spare as "purely an illustrator", though he was commissioned from time to time to illustrate.

Spare communicates a great deal to me, most particularly perhaps the background of a common consciousness from which we all spring, of which we are all aspects, and to which we all return. True, this is nothing new - the Hindu conception springs to mind of Brahma playing all the parts, as do traditions such as Advaita Vedanta, Ch'an Buddhism, etc - but Spare communicates it extremely well in my opinion, particularly in the 'Contexture of Being' series within his 1955 exhibition but in other pictures too.

This is not to say that all Spare's artwork is concerned with communicating this vision; Spare's work has a great deal of diversity, as is common with many artists. Nor is it to suggest that all of Spare's work is brilliant; some pictures are better than others, again in common with other artists.

That you find little of worth in Spare is clear; we're all entitled to our opinions, needless to say. Your opinion differs from mine, and is no more fact than mine.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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michaelclarke18
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Thanks for the reply.


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christibrany
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I disagree about him being only an illustrator too.
If you say that you most likely have never tried to make anything approaching art and also realism in pastels.
The fluidity and fogginess he gets in his pastels are made easier by the medium but hardly something as easy as drawing a line with a pencil.
The fact that he can make near photo realistic copies of people in pastel all the while creating a perfectly balanced and symbolically rich whole over the work is amazing.
There is nothing short of genius in such artistry, not even close to mere 'illustration'
Next time you pick up a piece of pastel or charcoal and try to get the effects and sense of space and otherworldliness he does out of that mundane little piece of carbon maybe you will realise the truth to what we are saying.


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michaelclarke18
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Next time you pick up a piece of pastel or charcoal and try to get the effects and sense of space and otherworldliness he does out of that mundane little piece of carbon maybe you will realise the truth to what we are saying.

I studied fine art for 5 years at Diploma, Bachelor, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters levels. I have also studied Art history, which has included Classical, Renaissance and Contemporary Modern.


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lashtal
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"michaelclarke18" wrote:
I studied fine art for 5 years at Diploma, Bachelor, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters levels. I have also studied Art history, which has included Classical, Renaissance and Contemporary Modern.

Now, that's the most impressive riposte I've seen here in quite some time!

I don't agree with you but I think we can all respect your right to an opinion…

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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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with all due respect michael, there is an unfathomable gulf between spending years studying something academically and not just being naturally gifted at it, but also spending years DOING it.

like Bernard Shaw said, 'Those that can do, those that can't , teach.'


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Joined: 13 years ago
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Michaelclarke:
I don't know that its entirely fair to compare Spare to Picasso because their fundamental aims would have been so different. How would you compare Spare's attempts to communicate the mystical with say, Max Ernst? Ernst was doing something very similar in many of his images to the point of developing a familiar / doppelganger LopLop that manifested in his work as well as his attempts to create chaotic dream states while waking and capture them on canvas. His "Robing of the Bride" being one of my favorite examples of this. Ernst has achieved an undisputed place in art history and few would argue against this.

Ernst's work lacks the almost expressionist overtones that you get in some pieces from Synthetic Cubism. On the other hand he is striving toward similar aims as Spare. The main point of similarity for me is they both seem to be concerned with the Sublime. Picasso on the other hand never seems concerned with the Sublime. Even "Guernica" with all it's overwhelming Horror is not trying to condense and communicate a mystical or esoteric state to the waking mind. There is nothing "Cosmic" in cubism, it is merely seeking to redefine the parameters of painting while Surrealism and its estranged children seemed to treat the work as an aesthetic residue of a more profound experience. Rarely do you find the same emotional resonance you get with some other schools.

S


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Thats should have read ... developing a familiar / doppelganger *named* LopLop that manifested in his work as well as his attempts to create chaotic dream states while waking and capture them on canvas.


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michaelclarke18
(@michaelclarke18)
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Joined: 15 years ago
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with all due respect michael, there is an unfathomable gulf between spending years studying something academically and not just being naturally gifted at it, but also spending years DOING it.

like Bernard Shaw said, 'Those that can do, those that can't , teach.'

I would like to tell you that I was actually DOING it - I did not just study the theory; you obviously don't understand anything about how British art schools function. By the way, I don't teach, and have never taught.

The only time when I admired the work of AOS, when when I could not draw and my painting very, very limited. As one progresses in ones understanding, one realises what constitutes superficiality and ones tastes change.


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