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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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17/06/2006 1:42 am  

Of the biographies written about Aleister Crowley, not counting Confessions, what is the best? What is the worst?

Jack


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lashtal
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17/06/2006 2:06 am  

Off the top of my head there's:

Richard Kaczynski: "Perdurabo"
Lawrence Sutin: "Do What Thou Wilt"
Roger Hutchinson: "The Beast Demystified"
Martin Booth: "Aleister Crowley: A Magick Life"
C R Cammell: "Aleister Crowley: The Man, The Mage, The Poet"
C R Cammell: "Aleister Crowley: The Black Magician" (reprint of above, without bibliographic appendix)
J F C Fuller: "The Star In The West: A Critical Essay Upon The Works Of Aleister Crowley"
Jean Overton Fuller: "The Magical Dilemma of Victor Neuberg"
Kenneth Grant: "Aleister Crowley & the Hidden God"
Kenneth Grant: "Aleister Crowley Remembered"
Francis King: "Magical World of Aleister Crowley"
Charles Kipp: "Astrology, Aleister & Aeon"
Daniel Mannix: "The Beast"
Israel Regardie: "Eye in the Triangle"
Susan Roberts: "The Magician of the Golden Dawn: The Story of Aleister Crowley"
P R Stephensen: "The Legend Of Aleister Crowley"
Gerald Suster: "Legacy of the Beast"
John Symonds: "The Great Beast"
John Symonds: "The Magic of Aleister Crowley"
John Symonds: "The Beast 666"
John Symonds: "King of the Shadow Realm"
Colin Wilson: "Aleister Crowley: The Nature of the Beast"

Kaczynski's "Perdurabo" and Symonds' final edition of his biography, "The Beast 666" are, in my opinion, the essential ones. Martin Booth's "A Magick Life" is a good popular read.

Worst beyond a shadow of a doubt, in my humble opinion, is Colin Wilson's "The Nature of the Beast": he really is capable of doing so much better.

Paul
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The Aleister Crowley Society

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AbulDiz
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17/06/2006 3:02 pm  

93.

Webmaster, if i may ask, what are the differences between the Symonds biographies?

I have King of the Shadow Realm and found it a bit of a tedious read, like the author wanted to lay the boot in every sentence, are the others any different?

Thanks for any reply,

93 93/93

AbulDiz.


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lashtal
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17/06/2006 3:28 pm  
"AbulDiz" wrote:
Webmaster, if i may ask, what are the differences between the Symonds biographies?

For what it's worth, The Great Beast struck me as a piece of hack-work - something thrown into the public arena as Symonds recognised the increasing interest in Crowley post mortem. The Magic of Aleister Crowley was an altogether better work, more perceptive, albeit hampered by a rather obvious lack of source material, or possibly of background research. Subsequent editions of The Great Beast combined material from both books and were all the better for it.

The King of the Shadow Realm was a rather unsuccessful attempt to draw a line under the work: one gets the impression that Symonds wanted it to be his last word on matters.

The Beast 666 was a beautifully produced book and although the differences between it and The King of the Shadow Realm are not substantial, there's a more rounded feel to it. I understand that it was prepared as a favour to a friend and to a family member involved in setting up the publisher's imprint.

Of course, with all Symonds' biographies of Crowley, one has to recognise that he was no admirer of the man and that they were written with the deliberate intention of raking up as much dirt as possible. The Beast 666 has far more detail about Crowley's toilet habits - literally - than one would necessarily want to know about, but it is a thorough and detailed description of the darker side of AC's personality and character. Combine it with Kaczynski's incredibly thorough and scholarly Perdurabo, recognising that the latter is written by someone who clearly admires the man and his work, and you find the ideal combination.

Inevitably, though, these are all just opinions and I'd welcome others' observations.

Paul
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The Aleister Crowley Society

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 Anonymous
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17/06/2006 3:43 pm  

Symonds books are worth having for the diary entrys if you are a beginner. Even if you are just starting out his prejudice is so obvious that you take what he writes with a lot of salt.
I don't think there would have been a Crowley revival without Symonds. The Hippy types who read the "Magic of Aleister Crowley" really re-started interest in Crowley which was pretty much dead as I recall.
Best Wishes Robert.


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Michael Staley
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17/06/2006 6:39 pm  
"rabrazier" wrote:
I don't think there would have been a Crowley revival without Symonds. The Hippy types who read the "Magic of Aleister Crowley" really re-started interest in Crowley which was pretty much dead as I recall.

I agree. I started to take an interest in the Crowley in the late 1960s, and one of my early source books was a copy of 'The Great Beast', which was about all that was available then. It was obvious at every page that it was written by a man who disapproved of his subject. Nevertheless, despite the sarcasm and the belittling, the value and intensity of Crowley's work shone through.

Symonds was valuable, keeping the flame alive (despite his best efforts, perhaps) until a more propitious time.


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lashtal
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17/06/2006 6:48 pm  
"MichaelStaley" wrote:
Symonds was valuable, keeping the flame alive (despite his best efforts, perhaps) until a more propitious time.

Nicely put, Michael, and very true. Others played their part, too, in a variety of ways and with greater subtlety: Jimmy Page, Kenneth Anger, Gerald Yorke, Helen Parsons Smith and Kenneth Grant among many.

Say what one likes about Crowley, he was most definitely ahead of his time...

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joe93
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19/06/2006 12:56 pm  

Can't agree that Colin Wilson's biog is the worst - he at least attempts to place A.C.'s theories in some kind of philosophical tradition (phenomenology) while he's spinning the usual yarn which ends in boiled eggs & smack in Hastings. He's more concered that The Beast's IDEAS can be placed with the likes of Nietszsche, Husserl and Heidegger (and he concludes they NEED to be) than making a shopping list of A.C.'s appearances on Eddie and the Hot Rods records...
There is too much of the latter and not enough of the former now. Who really needs to be discovering their Genius when they can be sitting on the dock of Ebay wastin' time (collecting Perdurabo's toenail clippings)?
Best biogs = Symonds' final version for the detail, either of Grant's for the knowledge.
Worst biogs = Attack of the Crowley-Clones (Suster) & the one that G. M. Kelly threatened to write ("I Wish I Was Aleister")


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lashtal
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19/06/2006 1:34 pm  

Thanks, joe93.

As you pointed out in your other Forum post, though, Wilson first made the connection between Crowley and Husserl back in 1971 in "The Occult", a book that I personally admire. My problems with the biography start with the quite appalling proof reading and general laziness of research. His biography adds almost nothing to the material presented in "The Occult" and "Mysteries".

As I said in my first post on this thread: "he really is capable of doing so much better." I'd like to see a revised edition...

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joe93
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19/06/2006 8:14 pm  

True - I do agree that Wilson's biog has a few howlers in it, although I doubt if it'll ever get revised (shame). The philosophical connections he makes are so important; we need more of this for Thelema to progress out of it's still safe barriers. Didn't someone mention at an Occulture festival a few years back that they were doing a book on Crowley & Husserl (with an intro by C.W.)? I haven't heard anything about it since.
93


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 Anonymous
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11/08/2006 8:05 pm  

I recently finished Sutins book. Had started to read it again when my "prized" copy of The Confessions arrived. 🙂 Am considering Perdurabo next. Will see how I feel after reading Confessions though. 😉


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Cronus
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11/08/2006 10:34 pm  

IMO start by reading Confessions but don't stop there. After Confessions I'd personally recommend "Do What Thou Wilt" by Sutin, a more recent biography with a more objective view. I feel those two books will provide a good balance though.

93


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Anonymous
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12/08/2006 12:27 am  

My opinion would be Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley by Richard Kaczynski.


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Bedazzled
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12/08/2006 2:14 pm  

Eye in the Triangle is still the best 'magical' biog.


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wulfram
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12/08/2006 5:27 pm  

I prefer "Eye in the Triangle" myself.


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lashtal
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12/08/2006 5:38 pm  

Oh, come on! That's three or four posts saying, in effect, nothing more than: "I ltke this one, more than the others"

I'm interested in the opinions of others, but equally interested in how those opinions were formed...

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 Anonymous
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14/08/2006 9:48 pm  

Ok, I'll take a stab at it. 🙂 My first read as mentioned earlier was "Do What Thou Wilt" and since this was my first read on the life of AC, naturally I enjoyed it. Am currently reading "Confessions" for the first time and although still not finished, this is by far a better book, mainly because I really enjoy AC's writing style, the way he tells his own story. Certain things he says and the way he says them give me a growing respect. Obviously this text is the "real deal" straight from the man himself, it could be considered "required reading" for all Thelemites. Upon completion of "The Confessions" I would like to give "Perdurabo" a try. This is because I've gotten the impression that it's one of the better biographies.

93 🙂


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wulfram
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15/08/2006 12:35 am  

To satisfy Paul's curiosity, I side with Regardie's bio simply because I enjoy the man's writing style. It seems rather staight forward and Regardie's knowledge of the occult and his personal relationship with AC lends a certain amount of authenticity to his narrative.


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 Anonymous
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15/08/2006 1:48 am  

"Confessions" will always be a very important book for me because it was the first Crowley I read, at the age of 14 or 15. It was my dad who, bizarrely enough, suggested I read some Crowley. He noticed I was reading about haunted houses and revivalist paganism so he thought I'd find Crowley to be right up my street. I think he thought it was a load of harmless nonsense, but with a high entertainment value.

It is a testament to the quality of the "Confessions" that even though I knew nothing about Crowley beyond my dad's description of him as a "notorious black magician", I renewed the loan on the book at the library about 3 or 4 times until I'd read it right the way through. I even remember the frustration when someone else reserved the book that I had to wait a few weeks until I could renew it again.

Being a schoolboy when I read "Confessions" meant I immediately connected with Crowley's sense of humour, and let's face it, it's a humour breakdown which prevents a lot of people from understanding his writings.


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 Anonymous
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15/08/2006 2:07 am  

Come to think of it, I remember when I first found the "Confessions" in the library, and I took the book to a reading area to browse. It was the standard Penguin paperback. I opened the cover and could see through the thin frontispiece, a somewhat obscene looking scrawl. "Bloody typical" thought I, "some bloody kids have grafiti'd a great big nob on the first page!" On turning the page and beholding the Awesome Truth, I took my first steps into the world of Magick.

Actually, I've just got the book down from my bookshelf and looking at the idealised self portrait I'm struck by it's closeness to the portrait of Lam. And by having the "A" of "Aleister" drawn as it is, he's placed his "dwarf self" beneath his erm, "bigger self".

😛


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kidneyhawk
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15/08/2006 2:20 am  

Nashimiron-

I'm SO tempted to start up with LAM again as your connection to that drawing is quite insightful-if you look at the vulvic ajna swirl around the Nulam image, you'll see something of AC's classic Phallic "A."

But the "Best Book!" I've been shying away from this only because I feel I would only be offering a redundant "ditto" to the votes for Regardie. And for the exact same reasons Wulfram mentioned to a Tau!

And isn't it funny that Alan Watts was the one who turned Robert Anton Wilson onto Crowley by loaning him that very book?

Can I cast a vote for the Zenster, too?

Kyle


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 Anonymous
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15/08/2006 4:57 am  

In my opinion, "Eye In The Triangle" should be approached after one not only has a grasp of the better biographies of Crowley the person, but also of magickal practices in general. Particularly, one should be a bit more than a novice in Qabalistic/Western Hermeticsm, before one can appreciate what Israel Regardie put forth in his book.
-R.Pike-


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 Anonymous
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15/08/2006 5:08 am  

Also, I feel that Israel Regardie's psychological expertise is helpful to decipher what some historical Crowley biographies don't really delve into without sounding vulgar, or resorting to Crowley's more scatalogical adventures.
-R.Pike-


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kidneyhawk
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15/08/2006 8:43 am  

Pike-

Hey!

I agree that EYE has a SLANT to it but I don't know that its angle or its scope and breadth of content is necessarily a stumbling stone to a newcomer...I first read EYE many many years back and although it DID leave a certain impression on me, coloring my perspective on the man as such, it also sufficiently intrigued enough to set me exploring more deeply.

I think I personally am drawn towards works that DO interject the first hand and anecdotal with the "objective" as they reveal something of the humanity involved. A good example is the Grants "ZOS SPEAKS." Prior to my acquisition of this book, I saw almost nothing of the "human" side of the Grants in the few KG books I own, just the ideas and an impression of what kind of practices must have fueled the writing. Reading of Steffi's desire to buy Kenneth a Spare as a birthday gift, the "Love Zos" signatures to rapidly dashed letters, "bar crawl" memories etc. gave a real human picture of the PEOPLE behind the works.

I think this is what I liked about EYE so much-it rose above the bio quips in general books on Magick I had read that sidestepped the humanity to focus soley on the "outer" doings, be that Cairo, Choronzon or coprophilia.

I took away from EYE a picture of a flawed personality who none the less both Attained and had much good to offer through the flaws, which is kind of how I view the lot of us all, able to hit the heights even if our own self-assessement turns up its bones and able to bring a certain light into our Universe, even when we cast our Shadows.

Just my 2:00 am insomniac thoughts...

Back to bed!

Kyle

Kyle


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 Anonymous
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16/08/2006 12:25 am  

I like the Great Beast, by Mr. John Symonds. It was the first biography I read on Crowley about 20 years ago. I met Mr. John Symonds by chance or sychronicity...His best friend Mr. Kenneth Grant would have called this chance meeting a 'tangential tantra' I am sure. He was a lovely man, very elderly (92 yrs old), and I interviewed him in his home over a cup of tea and cake with his lovely wife, who is a Doctor of Psychology... and I asked him many questions about Aleister Crowley and the book that I am writing on Magick (The Rhythm of the Hierophant)...It was very pleasant indeed. We also talked about his long and continuing friendship with Mr. Kenneth Grant and his Wife Steffi etc. Before I left, he insisted he would give me a copy of the The Great Beast...I said I already had a 1st edition, but he pulled out a huge tome of a book and gave it to me. The book he gave me is called 'The Beast 666' by THE PINDAR PRESS, 1997. I have not had time to read this as yet, but it looks very interesting.

Charles

(corrected...silly me 🙄 )


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lashtal
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16/08/2006 12:51 am  
"magispiegel" wrote:
Kenneth Grant would have called this chance meeting a 'tangenital tantra' I am sure... The book he gave me is called 'The Beast 666' by THE PINDAR PRESS, 1997. I have not had time to read this as yet, but it looks very interesting.

I think you'll find that Grant would be rather more likely to call it a "tangential tantra" - I shudder to think what a "tangenital tantra" is!

😉

The Beast 666 is the definitive edition of The Great Beast - earlier in this thread you'll see that I recommend The Beast 666 for its extraordinary level of detail.

Paul

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 Anonymous
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16/08/2006 12:58 am  

whoopsy! cheers Paul, thanks for the correction....all this writing has given me the shudders of a dyslexic me thinks 😀

Best
Charles


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 Anonymous
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16/08/2006 1:21 am  

Hey Kyle!
I agree with you. I think it's cool that a book like "Eye In the Triangle" can be a biography while leading the newcomer to different nuances of the path, without being too obscure. It's a really good lesson from a really great teacher like Israel Regardie.
-R.Pike-


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kidneyhawk
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16/08/2006 1:40 am  

I have nothing to add except that "Tangenital Tantra" could very well fit into Grant's unique occult techno-vocab! In fact I think he'd smile huge at the word play! Maybe it'll get back to him and he'll pop it into a new Typhonian Trilogy!


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Anonymous
 Anonymous
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16/08/2006 1:43 am  

Oh, come on! That's three or four posts saying, in effect, nothing more than: "I ltke this one, more than the others"

I'm interested in the opinions of others, but equally interested in how those opinions were formed...

I think I liked Perdurabo for the way it portrayed (honestly) Crowley the man as well as the Mage. Though it is at times disheartening (like The Unknown God by Martin P. Starr) to see the shortcomings (to say the least) in a person you admire, a clear, honest portrayal of the man was what I got from this book. (P.S. - Haven't read Eye in the Triangle before, but ordered it today...looking forward to it.)


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kidneyhawk
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16/08/2006 1:54 am  

...and I haven't read Perdurabo!!!

I think with its repeated mentioning I may go ahead and place an order myself!

1011101, I hear what you're saying loud and clear about the disheartening aspect of discovering ugly aspects of people who've impacted us so positively and powerfully...but I also think it is encouraging in the sense that we can see OURSELVES with our own ugly traits as being certainly able to achieve greatness and victory on our singular Paths, despite our flaws (and hopefully take heed and work out those flaws in ourselves more than certain of our predecessors!).

As much as AC stood with pen in hand to witness the birth of the Aeon, we ARE the AEON-may "those who follow" find a real growth and power in what we are being here and now!

A smile (and a lighter pocket book-"Perdurabo" incoming!)

Kyle


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 Anonymous
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16/08/2006 3:42 pm  

Apologies for being repetitive and boring here but 'Confessions' is my favourite and for all the most obvious reasons inclusive of the humour, 'Aka 'the donkey' incident. It just never fails to make me howl, (She writes doing just that)! 😆

Israel Regardie 'The Eye In The Triangle' comes second for the simple reason that his writing is less convoluted, each to their own of course.
Regardie dosent slate Aleister nor does he adore him and yet his writing does exude a sense of respect and as a reader I appreciate that......................so there you have it! 🙂

I bought 'The King Of The Shadow Realm' by Symonds and was put off by the first few pages where he finds it suitable to detail certain persons defecating into other persons mouths ❓ Ahem!
I dont think that was a necessary detail personally.


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 Anonymous
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16/08/2006 9:23 pm  
"kidneyhawk" wrote:
...and I haven't read Perdurabo!!!

I think with its repeated mentioning I may go ahead and place an order myself!

That's exactly what I was thinking about "Eye in the Triangle" after watching this thread evolve. 🙂 Reading Never ENDS! LOL


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kidneyhawk
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16/08/2006 10:27 pm  

Raych-

Is that called "Any POT in a storm?"

Edge-

I KNOW! It's crazy. I can remember distinctly a few moments where I felt this sort of irrate feeling about having to eventually die and not getting to read everything I wanted to!

Combining the above two comments, I try to maximize my time and have the basket next to my toilet stuffed with books instead of magazines!

Scatological Scholarship! If you add up all those minutes into the course of a lifetime, you can probably squeeze a couple full length college courses into the loo!

Kyle


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christibrany
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26/04/2010 10:01 pm  

i am thinking of getting King of the Shadow Realm, because I own and thoroughly enjoyed Magic of Aleister Crowley.
I cannot find a contents list, if I buy this volume (King of t Shadow Realm) will I be perturbed at a lot of repeats or is it worth getting if I liked the other one?
please help 🙂 thank you all!


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OKontrair
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26/04/2010 10:20 pm  

Symonds wrote the same book over and over again. 1. The Great Beast in 1952 followed by 2.The Magic of Aleister Crowley (1958 I think) then 3.The Great Beast 1971 which was a combination of 1 & 2 in one volume. A few slight revisions and variations but basically his first two books put together. Then 4. The King of the Shadow Realm which is an expanded version of the previous book. This book has the advantage that in the meanwhile society had become less uptight and he was able to be a little more frank. It's alright - as Symonds goes - but in the late 1990s he did his last, and fattest, version called The Beast 666. If you ever plan to get this one then money spent on the others you might consider wasted. The early dustjackets are nicer than the later ones. In my personal view all Symonds Crowley bios are clouded by his own preconceptions and attitudes but that's just a matter of opinion.

OK


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christibrany
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27/04/2010 1:25 am  

so if I dont want repeats and wasted money, since I already have Magic of Aleister Crowley it sounds like the only one I should buy is the very first Great Beast from 1952?
for no repeated text.
sounds good! thanks for that info!
anyone with more ideas let me know 🙂
US know i should say
take care
chris


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Horemakhet
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27/04/2010 8:57 am  

With Symonds it was mostly about the money. He was smart. ~~ My all time favourite will always be The Hag. To think that Leah actually copied down so much dictation; especially when it is restored to it's proper volume, amazes me. There is no other work like it. & she deserves to be credited properly in the new edition for her work; & for putting up with him in general.


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 Anonymous
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27/04/2010 9:30 am  

Horemakhet
Read on my friend. To Crowley, as is made evident in an entry in his diaries to the effect, of a pensive thought towards a strategy of manipulation of book retention to create a specialist knocked up market.
Money talks.
Sometimes the means justifies..
Where are we going to take this is the question, we still disagree on the basic interpretations of the writings to an abyss of difference. The matter of change is a multi hewed gemstone seen by many and understood by none, Including myself, I hasten to add.
To progress we need leadership, who now is our leader, and what is his manifesto to lead us towards progression? Insects all, great and small, some think to have progressed beyond the Crowley thought matrix, go back and sit in your bathing house to absorb the words written. A mere man you say!And ugly at that! Yes and some,

O yea of little faith.
Lashtal forever.


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christibrany
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27/04/2010 5:30 pm  

i am still reading the Hag, a little more than halfway through. I have the nice hc 1st ed from hill and wang. such a pretty pink star of babalon on the cover 🙂 I really like the bits about magic the most, but I found his mountaineering exploits mostly dull.
So i am glad to finally be getting to the magic bits, in Magical Workings, next is The Magus which will be awesome.
Does anyone know if he wrote more than was published of his later years, as part of Confessions? Meaning from roughly 1925 on?
Or did he stop writing the hag after the 20s?
itd be great if there wa smore to come when they republish it as oposed to just filling in some blanks of the earlier stuff.
My favourite 2 bios i have read are
1 The Confessions of AC - Crowley
2 The Magic of Aleister Crowley- Symonds
and I liked The Magic of AC by Francis King but its nothing spectacular. Just well written and interesting as an overview of his whole life.
Magic of AC is one of my faves because it goes into detail in the work he did in his major rituals, meaning the paris working, the abuldiz working, and the like. And its nice to have an outside view on these things instead of just AC's.
Plus the beginning part of Symonds' meetings with crowley are touching. He really followed him for a while.
~CHRiS


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Ariock
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27/04/2010 6:10 pm  

For the beginner, I would recommend "Book of Lies" by Disinformation. Rather than a Cowley bio, it is an interesting and eclectic Magick/Occult anthology. The articles about Crowley are good, and you also get to see his influence as his name and ideas pop up in in the majority of the other articles. If you are just trying to "get your feet wet", it is an easy and entertaining read. Contributors include Joe Coleman, Robert Anton Wilson, Genesis P-Orridge, Donald Tyson and Grant Morrison. Although a bit off topic, it also offers a great introduction to Rosaleen Norton.

"Confessions" is entertaining. Most biographies are good to get an understanding of the subject. Confessions is good AFTER you have an understanding of the subject. I would not recommend it to a beginner.

I did not enjoy Roger Hutchinson's "AC: The Beast Demystified". The author clearly isn't a fan of Crowley and I feel this seeps into the text. There is little new, and the author does not cite his sources. Also (perhaps this is the result of growing up reading too many comic books), since Crowley went out of his way to create various images of himself and rarely shied away from a camera, it would be nice to have a picture or two. I don't recall any in this book.


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Horemakhet
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27/04/2010 7:07 pm  

Sadly, there could never be a sequel to "The Hag". It was written in a special time & place: in The Abbey of Thelema, - & delivered via a perfect muse/scribe, & publisher. This, along with 'Diary of a Drug Fiend' also paid the bills. A life well lived up to that mark, with many more interesting episodes to come.... (key the biographers)


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christibrany
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27/04/2010 10:07 pm  
"Horemakhet" wrote:
A life well lived up to that mark, with many more interesting episodes to come.... (key the biographers)

yeah seriously i am constantly wanting to know in detail like in the Hag what happened post 1930's because you know there were just as many interesting exploits, even if they were of the more mundane or housebound variety, so what ?i m sure with such an interesting character they would be great reading.

maybe it will be my job to research, "The Autohagiography of Aleister Crowley TWO" Confessions of an Old Shaggy Beast.

to quote john lennon
"no flies on this frank boy"


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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27/04/2010 10:40 pm  

Kyle,

I feel you on not having enought time to read everything that you want. If I had the time and monet to read everything that I wanted then I would just be an "armchair magickian" as I would be sitting in a chair reading all day everyday! I am really appreciative of the ease in which we are able to obtain these myriad tomes of Forbidden Wisdom compared to Centuries ago when possing these texts ofen meant secretly copying manuscripts that one could be imprisoned or executed for having. This also reminds me John Dee's library being burnt while he was away....what more Enochiana and other magickal texts we are missing now because of those fools who decided to commit that terrible act of vadalism! The manuscripts from Hockley's library that are now being published is such a wonderful project of the preservation of magickal Lore! It saddens me that is impossible to do the same with Dee's library....just imagine what wonderful Lore was lost in that fire...

Back on topic, I too love reading The Hag! I can't wait to have a definitive publication date for the new edition!


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
Yuggothian
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2581
08/05/2010 1:19 am  
"lashtal" wrote:
"magispiegel" wrote:
Kenneth Grant would have called this chance meeting a 'tangenital tantra' I am sure... The book he gave me is called 'The Beast 666' by THE PINDAR PRESS, 1997. I have not had time to read this as yet, but it looks very interesting.

I think you'll find that Grant would be rather more likely to call it a "tangential tantra" - I shudder to think what a "tangenital tantra" is!

😉

The Beast 666 is the definitive edition of The Great Beast - earlier in this thread you'll see that I recommend The Beast 666 for its extraordinary level of detail.

Paul

if youre interested in tangenital tantray 😉 here is a good site for a laugh:
http://www.neatorama.com/2007/04/30/30-strangest-animal-mating-habits /"> http://www.neatorama.com/2007/04/30/30-strangest-animal-mating-habits/


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Walterfive
(@walterfive)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 856
08/05/2010 4:22 pm  

Well, "The Hag" is incomplete, Horemakhet. Grant's editing and deletions aside, "Confessions" remains half-published, half unpublished. The 2nd Part made it to galleys, but was never published. And then the galleys were lost. For decades, only a couple of hand-written or hand-typed transcriptions, made by Crowley's students, were in existence, and until a few years ago, no one had obtained copies of the separate manuscripts to be correlated and compared, at least one was in the hands of a private collector. As has been mentioned elsewhere, a 4-Volume edition is currently in the works and being edited by Hymaneus Beta. We've been waiting several years for this one. It will be worth the wait, I'm sure.

My favorite Crowley biography will be the forthcoming 2nd Ed. of "Perdurabo: Revised and Expanded" that includes the material from the 2005 "Perdurabo Outtakes."

And as this thread is an old one, I thought mention of "Secret Agent 666" by Richard Spence was in order. Not my "favorite" but every Crowley biography published prior to it is now due for a re-write, and a re-reading of it ought to accompany any reading of any Crowley Bio, for a date-to-date comparison, offering, as it does, some insights to Crowley's otherwise puzzling travel itineraries, acquaintances and activities.


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alysa
(@alysa)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 655
08/05/2010 4:44 pm  

Though the "Unabridged Confessions of Aleister Crowley" in a definitive unexpurged six-volumed edition, will of course very much be worth the wait, and also the forthcoming Second and Revised edition of "Perdurabo" by Richard Kaczynski will be worth the wait, and also Secret Agent 666 by Richard Spence might be worth a read, I think also the long awaited English translation of Marco Pasi's book "Aleister Crowley and the Temptation of Politics" will be very much worth the wait.


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Walterfive
(@walterfive)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 856
08/05/2010 8:32 pm  

Tell us some more about that Alysa?


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2581
09/05/2010 2:13 am  

double post *see below*


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
Yuggothian
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2581
09/05/2010 2:14 am  

I'm reading Colin Wilson's 'The Nature of the Beast' and so far I have to say im enjoying it. Im only on page 40 or so out of something like 200 so maybe it gets worse. I'm just curious about why the bad reviews among the one or two times it's been mentioned here?
I will admit that the lack of any source other than the 'Confessions' (so far) is kind of annoying. he just seems to quote it and then talk about it ad nauseum with no new material. But what makes it enjoyable is his unique take on things and his insight into certain character traits as a scientist type who became a believer in magic slowly.
So so far so good . I will see what happens and if those negative reviews are justified in my opinion. I only got it because i am really enjoying his book 'the philosophers stone' , and it was only 10 dollars used 🙂
bye all


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