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Proteus
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23/01/2010 11:33 pm  

I'm reading notes from a lecture that refers to "Aleister Crowley's Club of Pan in Cambridge."

I don't think I've seen that referenced elsewhere. Any ideas?

John


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ianrons
(@ianrons)
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23/01/2010 11:49 pm  

This would be the Pan Society, founded by Neuberg in about 1907 and discussed by AC in the Confessions, pp.564-5. I am not aware of any other corroboration, but I'm sure somebody else here can find some.


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Proteus
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23/01/2010 11:58 pm  

I suppose it could be. But, it seems like Crowley's involvement with that group was pretty insubstantial (at least what he was comfortable enough to admit in Confessions!) where it wouldn't be referred to as his club.


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ianrons
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24/01/2010 12:03 am  

That assumes:
a) the lecture notes are accurate;
b) the lecturer was quoting accurate research accurately; and that
c) there were two similarly-named clubs in Cambridge in which Crowley was involved (which, given the scandal that erupted as a result of the Pan Society, seems unlikely).


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empiricus
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24/01/2010 2:17 am  

93,

Which notes, which lecture, where, when and what do they actually say?

All the best....

93 93/93


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Proteus
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24/01/2010 3:20 am  

John Boardman's lecture "The Great God Pan: The Survival of an Image" given at the National Gallery in London as the subject of the annual Walter Neurath Memorial Lecture of 1997. I wouldn't doubt the scholarship of his work.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Boardman_(art_historian )"> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Boardman_(art_historian)

The lecture notes, published by Thames and Hudson (ISBN 0-500-55030-1), covers aspects of the god Pan throughout history. Highly recommended.

From Page 26 (referring to Pan):
"In Europe, however, he had a far more real function as a Devil, and when we come to the cult of witchcraft he is very much in evidence, in witches' rites or ceremonies down to Aleister Crowley's Club of Pan in Cambridge. As recently as 1970, a new periodical entitled Man, Myth & Magic featured a cover picture - described as 'Portrait of demonic elemental' - by the late Austin Osman Spare, who had invented a method of conjuring up such creatures, but we all know who this is really."

Plate 28 of the book is the magazine cover which is a detail of AOS's The Vampires are Coming (1955) used by permission of Kenneth Grant. There's no other references to Crowley or AOS in the book.


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SatansAdvocaat
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25/01/2010 4:52 pm  

As ianrons states, this was Victor Neuberg's Pan Society with which AC had informal affiliations - it certainly was not a society run by AC.

There is more information on this episode in John Symond's last revision of his lifelong, love-hate relationship with AC - THE BEAST 666 (Pindar Press, 1997). However, I don't have the book to hand and cannot be too precise about details.

The gist is that the Master of the College, (St.John's, Cambridge, I believe) objected to a person of AC's 'reputation' being a guest on College premises and banned him. There was some bad feeling and bad words on both sides, but nothing much came of it. However, it does appear to form the basis of Dennis Wheatley's apocryphal story that AC ran a Black Magic Coven when he was at Cambridge and ritually cursed a Master, who subsequently broke a leg - an interesting example of the genesis of fictional AC episodes.

93, 93/93.
Satan's Advocaat.


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