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Reactions of your family and friends to your interest in AC


 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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Wasn't sure where to post this, but this section seems as good as any. Recently while mentioning my book...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Three-Dangerous-Magi-Gurdjieff-Crowley/dp/184694435X/ref=dp_return_2?ie=UTF8&n=266239&s=books

...on an Osho website, I was surprised (though not terribly) by the vehement reaction to my inclusion of Crowley in the same breath as Osho. I had posted a simple "A book about three controversial 20th century masters" and one poster duly replied, "Crowley a master?? Pull the other one, mate!" to which another breathlessly added, "He's right! Crowley let one of his own children die of child neglect!" To my great amusement some other guy soon after posted "What about the statutory rapes that took place at Osho's commune in Oregon in the 80s?" (Technically he was right; more than one adult at the commune was boning a girl under the age of consent). A flame war soon erupted. When I checked back a couple of days later, the entire thread had been deleted.

I'm 51 years old, and have been a student of AC's writings since around 1975. During that time I've encountered a phenomenal amount of public ignorance around this man (something I attempt to address in my book). For reasons that many of you here are aware of, he incites even to this YouTube-infested day over-the-top reactions from many, but perhaps none more so than those who fancy themselves "spiritual seekers".

I'm curious to know how you have all tended to experience the reactions of others in your life to your interest in Crowley? Your family, your friends, your lover/spouse, your children? And how have you tended to deal with it?


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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Most of my family think I'm some sort of Satanist or a "Witch" (because of my books by A.O.S, Chumbley, and Gardner) but when they talk that way to me I just laugh a sinister type of laugh and walk away. 😈


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Ariock
(@ariock)
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I got my interest in occult texts from finding my father's collection. My mother brought me flowers on the opening day of my old occult bookshop. The community was not as welcoming due to a high concentration of conservative Christian churches in the area. I essentially had a target painted on my back for years, but that is a story for another time. For lovers/spouses, I have a library in my living room, so the cat is out of the bag the 1st time they come over. If they have a problem with it, I imagine they wouldn't come back. My wife has her own life and if something I am interested in interests her, she'll take part. For friends, I have work friends, friends of common interests, "facebook" friends, etc and topic need only come up when appropriate. And my children think I'm weird.


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alysa
(@alysa)
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Also to my opinion Thelema isn't that strange a religion or thought-system as many would like to see it, but people like to make it stranger than it in reality is, also when I say to someone I know that I have an interest in Aleister Crowley or Thelema they look at me with a strange face or do as if I'm still in my teens, my parents they do not really enjoy it that I have so much interest in Crowley, Thelema, or magic(k) for example but they let me study it when I have the time, my broader family seems also not to like it, but I try not to let myself be influenced by so many people, I think it myself in this way they have their thought-system and I have mine, I have come to a certain age, I'm of a sound enough mind enough so that I think I am able to think or handle regarding religious or spiritual questions very much according to my own way of thinking.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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I keep it to myself and when asked I just say he was an adventurer in many areas and that keeps the kids quiet. My son is aware he is a "person of interest" in popular culture so to speak but has shown zero interest as to why.

The wife I think thinks he was a nut but thinks it's good for me "to have a hobby" 🙂


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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There's a reason you keep this stuff secret. And not just because you'll bore the hell out of your friends if you don't....


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michaelclarke18
(@michaelclarke18)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1265
 

It all depends on how you frame it.

I tend to say I have an interest in the esoteric - and leave it at that. Saying you are interested in the occult - or Magick - makes people think you are nuts and or gullible.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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The 1st thing they teach you in novel writing school is don't talk out loud about your novel to anyone. You disappate all the story telling momentum and all you get for your trouble is...no more story...


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Yes, silence is one of the Four Powers of the Sphinx, and the Hermetic arts have always been surrounded by a veil of secrecy, 'hermetically sealed'.

In Germany there is the common understanding that religion and spirituality are private matters. In an increasingly materialistic climate, religious topics have become kind of taboo. So there is little reason to talk about Crowley or Thelema with anybody except my wife and a handful of very close friends. Who all think that I have always been a funny person, read strange books, had curious pastimes and such. 🙂

Of course there are nevertheless periods when I would love to talk about religion, philosophy and how I see things. This need is taken care of exclusively by the internet and all the friendly people who visit certain forums...

Eilthireach


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
Posts: 0
 
"Mahakala77" wrote:
Wasn't sure where to post this, but this section seems as good as any. Recently while mentioning my book...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Three-Dangerous-Magi-Gurdjieff-Crowley/dp/184694435X/ref=dp_return_2?ie=UTF8&n=266239&s=books

...on an Osho website, I was surprised (though not terribly) by the vehement reaction to my inclusion of Crowley in the same breath as Osho. I had posted a simple "A book about three controversial 20th century masters" and one poster duly replied, "Crowley a master?? Pull the other one, mate!" to which another breathlessly added, "He's right! Crowley let one of his own children die of child neglect!" To my great amusement some other guy soon after posted "What about the statutory rapes that took place at Osho's commune in Oregon in the 80s?" (Technically he was right; more than one adult at the commune was boning a girl under the age of consent). A flame war soon erupted. When I checked back a couple of days later, the entire thread had been deleted.

I'm 51 years old, and have been a student of AC's writings since around 1975. During that time I've encountered a phenomenal amount of public ignorance around this man (something I attempt to address in my book). For reasons that many of you here are aware of, he incites even to this YouTube-infested day over-the-top reactions from many, but perhaps none more so than those who fancy themselves "spiritual seekers".

This looks like a very interesting book, Mahakala77, I look forward to getting a copy. Compliments too for producing such a work.

Crowley is (imo) so very often neglected in similar comparative works because of who and what he was - not easily categorised, due to so much intense and extreme internal complexity and self-contradiction brought about through his insistence upon "going there" as a matter of much-needed iconoclasm. The fact that he was a highly compromised character in some ways, and was (sometimes!) even utterly transparent about this fact, has sometimes been enough to turn would-be appreciators off him entirely, which I see as a great shame. It is fair enough I suppose for people to decide how much nonsense they want to put up with, and perhaps he isn't everyone's cup of tea. But his contribution to the several fields in which he participated (literature, occultism, mountaineering, poetry, art, raconteurship, and the rest...) is vast, rich, generous, extremely sophisticated and rewarding, and intensely worthwhile spending the necessarily substantial amounts of time and energy in "coming to terms with" in order to appreciate properly rather than just dismiss. Those who neglect his immense contributions to these fields (whose scope and quality is demonstrably world-class in every respect, in at least two of them far better than anything else in his day), simply because he was a world-class jerk on enough occasions as well (as are pretty much all human beings on occasion - especially those who push themselves as hard as he did), are, in my opinion, missing the wood for the trees.

Terence McKenna once said, "if you don't contradict yourself, obviously your position is not complex enough". This applies to Crowley in many ways, I feel. I am often extremely critical of certain parts of Crowley's shoddy thinking, not to mention his weasel-like behaviour on occasion, but it is always in an assumed spirit of Respect which one cannot help but have for someone whose contributions were, despite their flaws, so extraordinary, and so very profound. It is about time more commentators plucked up the nerve to tackle this magic mirror of a man on his own terms - warts and all, instead of dismissing him out of ignorance, fear, stupidity, and the rest.

I'm curious to know how you have all tended to experience the reactions of others in your life to your interest in Crowley? Your family, your friends, your lover/spouse, your children? And how have you tended to deal with it?

My own interest in Crowley is part of a broader interest in the living and ongoing heritage of practical magic, which is, in turn, an extension of an innate disposition towards wholistic, humanistic natural philosophy in the original sense. The details of my interests are reserved for those who are capable of appreciating them, or who may be encouraged or delighted by them. With rare exceptions.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law,

I don't promote it, but if it comes up, then so be it. Like others on here, it's all laid out at my place, so either they are okay with it, or they don't come back. In any event, once the shock value is seen through, people look at the fruits of my life and judge for themselves.

love is the law, love under will.


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Shiva
(@shiva)
Not a Rajah
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 6475
 

"Let me in, wee-ooh, let me in! I wanna study your mysteries - which, of course, I will hold SECRET and True ... "

And then you're going to tell your family and friends about this?

If you have NOT taken such an oath (or one sort of like it in single-line lineages), then I guess you're interested, or curious, or fascinated, or playing around, or rebellious, or [add your own words here], in which case you can do whatever you want and tell any family member, or friend, or minister, or police officer, or judge, or spouse [etc], anything you want about your dabblings in the dangerous, deadly, drug-and-sex infested world of occult satanism. Take a thousand people who speak before thinking - and you will have a thousand different tales. But they will mostly be horror stories of anger and rejection.

AC said that The Family was public enemy number one! (It certainly was for Solar Lodge - even as an illusion ... 🙄 )
The Family is defined as any relative, associate, or society that shares your basic cultural programming [4th neuro-circuit].

It's NOT that one's interest in Thelema or Crowley or the Esoteric Arts is what "triggers" their opposition to one's endeavors. It's anything different that causes the reaction.

Scenario: A Saudi prince announces his desire to study Christianity and to marry a Chinese woman. How will his family and friends react?

On the other hand, if you HAVE taken such an oath (or one sort of like it in single-line lineages), then (if you're smart) you'll seek to apply the fourth power of the Sphinx: "Silence."

There are mysterious forces at work that sometimes cause hilarious or disastrous scenarios in relation to oaths of secrecy. Even if one is simply a western occult scholar who is not a Saudi prince.

In any case, your family and friends will probably be saddened at your interest ("He's going to hell for sure!"), but they will undoubtedly pray for the salvation of your soul.


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michaelclarke18
(@michaelclarke18)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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AC said that The Family was public enemy number one! (It certainly was for Solar Lodge - even as an illusion ... )
The Family is defined as any relative, associate, or society that shares your basic cultural programming [4th neuro-circuit].

Most cults are like that; prohibiting access to those who may be influential and a little bit more critical. Scientology is like that. I like to think Thelema has gone beyond that and is open to all.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Interesting post Shiva but also keep in mind the Oath of the A.'.A.'., to openly speak of the A.'.A.'. and it's principles with whatever understanding you may possess. I am very proud of being a Thelemite and will tell people about Thelema, on a case by case basis though. Usually, yep, about 90% of the time I can talk about it. The other ten percent... Jewish. LOL


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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"Shiva" wrote:
AC said that The Family was public enemy number one! (It certainly was for Solar Lodge

LOL... well done.

As for family and friends I just don't find that my traffic with strange angels, tinkering with currents (both dead and otherwise) as well as experiments in feral alchemy comes up all that often in conversation. I suppose I could try and steer the discussion in that direction but I find intent and ideas can be spilled out the mouth before they have the chance to come to fruition.


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Shiva
(@shiva)
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"uranus" wrote:
... keep in mind the Oath of the A.'.A.'., to openly speak of the A.'.A.'. and it's principles with whatever understanding you may possess.

Of course! But there's one small misconception here.

The Oath of the A.'.A.'. (all of the AA Oaths), Are taken : (1) in relation to control of an aspect of one's own self, (2) in the presence of a "superior" or more advanced "link," along with (3) an invocation of the AA to help out.

After signing or verbally affirming such an oath, the new initiate is handed an ancient, mysterious scroll (Paper A, B, C, etc) wrapped in lotus leaves which suggests or recommends or even dictates that the initiate should accomplish tasks from his link that are issued by the AA, and that he should everywhere speak of the AA and its principles ...

But ... At no point is there an OATH of "obedience" or an OATH of "openly speaking." This is all stuff that is slipped in after the Oath is taken, and it's non-binding in terms of magickal oath-binding. These things are merely Crowley's wishes for how he would liked to have seen things move along.

In the final analysis, any tongue-wagging must be up to the discrimination of the individual, who, if he slips up and mis-judges the situation, will simply have to deal with a lot of hassle and grief.

It is interesting, though, that we have the AA and we have the OTO. One stands for free and open speech, the other requires secret-keeping and silence. Put that one in your Zen koan and light it!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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"A Thelemite? I thought that was something surveyors used!"


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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"Shiva" wrote:
It is interesting, though, that we have the AA and we have the OTO. One stands for free and open speech, the other requires secret-keeping and silence. Put that one in your Zen koan and light it!

Had, brother - had . . .


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
Yuggothian
Joined: 13 years ago
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wot you mean had? They are taking new recruits and there are plenty of people active in each.


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Not this thread again,
I have really Hadit.


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Nomad
(@nomad)
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That gets a *like* from me Scott 😀

I'm curious to know how you have all tended to experience the reactions of others in your life to your interest in Crowley? Your family, your friends, your lover/spouse, your children? And how have you tended to deal with it?

An interesting question Mahakala77... Two considerations come to my mind:

1: The occult has always been an interest/vocation of a very small minority, and 2: The Aeon is still very young.

For these reasons it is unlikely many will have even heard of Crowley, for his key area of expertise is not even a blip on most folk's radar. And, of those that have heard of him, they are very rarely ready for the elegant apex of philosophy that is the phrase "Do what thou wilt" - still hemmed as they are by Old Aeon thinking. In either case they're bound to find anyone's passionate interest in his teachings rather baffling.

When I first came across Crowley in the late 90s he was a major revelation to me; his writings took my rather eclectic spirituality to a whole new level. Thus I was constantly talking to people about him - and then constantly being disappointed when they found my fascination either bizarre, errant, or just downright evil. I then decided to keep silence on the matter.

This approach worked well for a number of years, but then I received the II* of OTO and suddenly felt compelled to be more open about my Crowleyitis. (I suspect my change of heart was at least partly due to the karma of that degree.) And I've been quite open about my interest ever since. Because of this most seem to think of me, at the very least, as being a rather wayward eccentric. Others think worse. But my 'care factor' as to the opinion of others seems to have dissipated the more the current has grown within me.

And if even just one person was to look into Crowley - and subsequently take up the Work - because of my openness on the subject, then the negative reactions of the majority are more than compensated for.

(We are, after all, "against the people"!)


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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Someone once told me they see the commentary on Liber Legis as a prophecy 😀

Those who discuss the contents of this Book are to be shunned by all, as centres of pestilence.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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Topic starter  

Interesting replies.

Noctifer --

This looks like a very interesting book, Mahakala77, I look forward to getting a copy. Compliments too for producing such a work.

Thanks.

Crowley is (imo) so very often neglected in similar comparative works because of who and what he was - not easily categorised, due to so much intense and extreme internal complexity and self-contradiction brought about through his insistence upon "going there" as a matter of much-needed iconoclasm. The fact that he was a highly compromised character in some ways, and was (sometimes!) even utterly transparent about this fact, has sometimes been enough to turn would-be appreciators off him entirely, which I see as a great shame.

You raise a good point, the issue of AC's transparency. I do touch on that in the book. I suspect it's one of the reasons he is a potentially popular figure during these times of the 'smartphone Zeitgeist', in which half of what you say or do is being cached somewhere. Crowley is highly unusual for a mystic in that regard, regardless of whether or not it was rampant self-importance/need for attention (Colin Wilson's main argument) or his intuition that a defining feature of the New Aeon would be this very transparency. How many mystics write openly about their life ordeals? Not many.

Terence McKenna once said, "if you don't contradict yourself, obviously your position is not complex enough".

McKenna, a very cool guy. Died too young. He made a good CD on alchemy and John Dee, called 'The Alchemical Dream'. Worth a look.

Shiva:

AC said that The Family was public enemy number one!

And he had a solid insight there. It's become a somewhat common understanding in "meta-psychology" that the people closest to you will (in the vast majority of cases) oppose your growth the most. The reasoning behind this is fairly straightforward: those closest to us, if sensing that we are moving forward in any fashion, will tend to feel abandoned. Or, it will make them more aware of any fears they have in breaking free of societal or family conditioning. And so, even if 'wishing the best', they will seek to reel back in the 'wayward' son (or daughter).

One does, of course, have to bear in mind AC's dysfunctional relationship with his mother, although apparently he felt some grief at her passing, always a sign that a man has not completely forsaken his conscience. 🙂 That said, it is arguably the case that for many young men (with the emphasis on 'young') breaking free of the mother (and any unconscious allegiance to her that holds him back) is an essential part of his development. Recall Jesus denying his mother (Matthew 12

While Jesus was still talking to the crowd, his mother and brothers stood outside, wanting to speak to him. Someone told him, 'Your mother and brothers are standing outside, wanting to speak to you.' He replied to him, 'Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?' Pointing to his disciples, he said, 'Here are my mother and my brothers. For whoever does the will of my Father in heaven is my brother and sister and mother'.

He is (I gather) speaking from the perspective of absolute truth, at which point the entire cosmos is one's family. But to get to that point we need to be an individual first, and I think AC was a good example of the courage needed to follow one's truth -- and to access one's True Will -- even if that means moving counter to the expectations of one's family or immediate peers (as it so often does) -- in AC's case, both family and his Cambridge milieu.

Nomad --

For these reasons it is unlikely many will have even heard of Crowley, for his key area of expertise is not even a blip on most folk's radar.

A good point, one useful to bear in mind for anyone who has 'taken the red pill and gone down the rabbit hole'. The tendency is to think that others are more aware of one's object of admiration than they actually are, and that's true in AC's case as well.

I think that in general we live in a very superficial time, a real 'Kali Yuga' in technified disguise. I was walking down a street in my city the other day, and I swear every second person was gazing into their iphone or blackberry, oblivious to the world around them, fixated on their 2-dimensional facebook pixels. Mystics like Crowley represented, all other traits notwithstanding, the idea of penetrating deeply into things. As such, he is both freaky to others in this time, and fascinating, because he shakes people up. He never forsook his masculine core, the ability to focus and stay with something, which is becoming an increasingly rare thing in our time of informational overload. Most people's attention spans have been damaged by all the rampant technified nonsense. AC was highly focused -- just look at his classic mug-shot used on the cover of Richard Kaczynski's book -- the polar opposite of the modern day spaced out surfer.

Now I have to get out of here, I have something else to check online... 🙂


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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I didn't fully understand the importance of occult secrecy until I got stuck next to a dinner party guest who droned on and on about their freaking chakras opening. Evidently these Chakra things can open and then stuff shoots upwards called Tortalini. There's a reason the Sphinx gets many dinner party invitations - it's the 3rd power of the Sphinx, the power not to talk about pasta.


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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laffjoose=lol 😀 the tortellini snake going up through the fusili chakra


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Shiva
(@shiva)
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"Mahakala77" wrote:
... and I swear every second person was gazing into their iphone or blackberry, oblivious to the world around them, fixated on their 2-dimensional facebook pixels.

Aeons don't just stop ... and then another Aeon begins. One Aeon overlaps the next, and this overlapping timezone is known as a "transition period."

When looking at the 2,000-year, astrological Aeons (Pisces, Aquarius, etc), the overlap is said to be a couple hundred years.

When looking at the rays, as they shift in and out of incarnation, it is said that the 6th ray of Devotion (Jesus, Christianity) is phasing OUT of incarnation (and has been doing so since around 600 AD - coincidentally heralding the end of the dark ages) and the 7th ray of Ceremonial Magic is phasing INTO incarnation. This is one of the causes of the present worldwide turmoil.

Transition periods are always noted for their emblem of "increased communication." Starting somewhere around 1904 [more or less], we have had the introduction of cars, planes, eletricity, radio, phones, tv, computers, cell phones. Now all conveniently rolled into one handheld magical wand device to allow you instant communication, planet-wide of course, and to be constantly entertained or otherwise connected directly into the hypnotic matrix. It's an addiction. And it's leading a whole generation of rats over the cliff into permanent digitalization.

Yoga? What Yoga? I don't need no Yoga! I got'a brain-implanted b-phone and I'm always in Samadhi.

Or maybe thinking long distance.

Anyway, one thing is for certain: We're in the midst of a transition period!

It is certainly fitting that the beginning of the Aeon of Horus should be March 20, 1904. Crowley's record says: "March 20 - At 10 p.m. did well--Equinox of Gods--Nov--(? new) C.R.C. (Christian Rosy Cross, we conjecture.) Hoori now Hpnt (obviously "Hierophant")."
- Equinox of the Gods

Liber AL followed about 3 weeks later.

And scholars will argue forever about the beginning of the Age of Aquarius, placing it anywhere from 1765 AD up to 2106 AD, perhaps not even agreeing at the fall of the next Great Equinox, when blessing will no longer be poured upon our hawk-headed mystical lord.

In my heart and mind, though, I know that there was one magical event that announced the arrival of the New Age upon Malkuth at ground-zero: One, irretrievable, irrevocable, instant revealing of Hadit just after he "goes."

"For it is I that go." - Liber AL

.......... Trinity

"Trinity was the code name of the first test of an atomic bomb on July 16, 1945 at the White Sands Proving Ground. The weapon's informal nickname was "The Gadget." This date is usually considered to be the beginning of the Atomic Age." - paraphrased from Wikipedia

http://www.amwest-travel.com/awt_trinity.htm l"> http://www.amwest-travel.com/awt_trinity.html


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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Topic starter  
"Shiva" wrote:
"Trinity was the code name of the first test of an atomic bomb on July 16, 1945 at the White Sands Proving Ground. The weapon's informal nickname was "The Gadget." This date is usually considered to be the beginning of the Atomic Age."

The early 20th century was a powerful juncture for change, as was the 1940s as you point out. I once did a bit of research into significant events that occurred between the years 1947-51, which was an incredible period of strange, powerful, and rapid changes in human civilization. (Not to mention, AC dying in the middle of all this). Here are just some of them:

1) March 12, 1947 -- The "Truman Doctrine" is approved by Congress, consisting of U.S. aid in fighting Communism in Turkey and Greece, thus beginning the U.S. anti-socialism crusade, a backdoor to eventual world dominance.

2) June 5, 1947 -- Congress authorizes $12 billion in aid to European countries (the "Marshall Plan") which essentially revives Europe economically after the devestation of of WWII. This firmly ensconces the U.S. hand in Europe and lays the foundation for the later creation of NATO.

3) June 24, 1947 -- The first UFO report is given by an Air Force pilot over Mt Rainer, Washington. (The world had seen these craft before, to be sure, but this was the sighting that first dubbed them "flying saucers", and waves of reports soon followed).

4) July 2, 1947 -- The famous Roswell UFO crash.

5) August 15, 1947 -- India and Pakistan become separate states, the beginning of over 50 years of conflict over Kashmir (an area which is consistently referred to in esoteric schools as being a key zone of interface with 'higher dimensions', as per John Bennett's 'Khwajagan').

6) September 18, 1947 -- The CIA is created by the National Securities Act.

7) December 18, 1947 -- The U.S. Air Force officially becomes a separate entity from the Army.

8 ) April 30, 1948 -- The "Organization of American States" is founded.

9) May 14, 1948 -- Israel, backed by the U.S., is proclaimed a "state", thus beginning interminable Arab-Israeli conflict, key of which is Jerusalem, center of three major holy sites of the Big Three monotheistic Western faiths (and Jerusalem, like Kashmir, is also associated with baraka, a spiritual 'power zone').

10) June 23, 1948 -- The U.S.S.R. ceases all traffic into West Berlin, leading to the solidification of the Wall and the Cold War.

11) August-September, 1948 -- Korea is partitioned into North and South -- by the U.S.S.R. and U.S.

12) August 24, 1949 -- NATO is formed, by U.S., Canada, and ten European allies.

13) October 1, 1949 -- The People's Republic of China is proclaimed.

14) January 31, 1950 -- Truman authorizes production of the Hydrogen Bomb, the ultimate military threat.

15) June 25, 1950 -- Communist North Korean invades South Korea.

16) 1950 -- The decline of European political and military control over Africa and Asia begins, and the American influence grows. In 1951, the U.S. signs a security pact with Australia and New Zealand, and begins their support of anti-communist forces in Indochina.

This movement of events, between 1947-51, clearly set the tone for the geopolitical face of the world we now inhabit. The 80s arguably marked the next transition, with Gorbachev a key player, leading to the USSR breakup, Berlin Wall fall, first Gulf War and gradual restructuring of the Middle East.

I am the warrior Lord of the Forties: the Eighties cower before me, & are abased...

And then there's the business of 'My number is 11'...with 2011 around the bend. Hopefully not that bend. 🙂


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 Anonymous
Joined: 52 years ago
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I know this is extending the envelope a bit, but:

Dec. 17, 1903 e.v.: the Wright Brothers make first manned heavier-than-air flight in known human history.

... a mere fifty-eight years later:

April 12, 1961 e.v.: Yuri Gagarin makes first manned geo-orbital space flight.

... and a mere eight years later

July 20, 1969 e.v. the crew of Apollo 11 land on the Moon. Sadly, as far as we know, they did not proclaim the Aeon of Horus, announcing "Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law" in their most distant-ever address to fellow Earthlings. A bit of a missed opportunity there.

Since then, it has been the microscopic and cybernetic conquests that have stolen the show - notably, nanotech, biochemistry and medicine.

Just imagine what might be on the cards when the monkeys wake up properly! (I don't want to imagine what it seems that it will take to wake them up, though).


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