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The surname "Crowley"


 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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I'm russian and don't know english very well, so I have one question. When I first heard the surname of Aleister, it was a few years ago when I became interested in his personality, I found his surname related to the english word "crow" (kind of bird), but then when I looked it up in the dictionary I found another meaning of the word "crow", it was something like "cry of the cock"...so that made me think of this...which one of the two meanings is related to Aleister's surname in real?
Maria Sikkert


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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I didn't find anything as to what the surname means, but according to Irishnation.com, the name Crowley is from the native Gaelic O'Cruaidhlaoich Sept (family or clan) of County Roscommon and later County Cork in Ireland. That jumble of letters is pronounced "O'Cruh-lehh", and the "O" prefix means simply "grandson of...", (as Mac or Mc means "son of...")

Hope this helps.

Moth


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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"MariaSikkert" wrote:
I'm russian and don't know english very well, so I have one question. When I first heard the surname of Aleister, it was a few years ago when I became interested in his personality, I found his surname related to the english word "crow" (kind of bird), but then when I looked it up in the dictionary I found another meaning of the word "crow", it was something like "cry of the cock"...so that made me think of this...which one of the two meanings is related to Aleister's surname in real?
Maria Sikkert

Crow contains both of those meanings. The cock crows when the sun rises.

93


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 Anonymous
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Extracted from : http://www.geocities.com/chasga310/chas02.htm

Origin of the Crowley name

During the mid-eleventh century in Ireland, Diarmuid, the son of Conchubhar,
who in fact was one of the McDermots of Moylurg in Connach, demonstrated his
great prowess as a warrior and acquired the nickname of "An Cruadhlaoch,"
which means 'hardy warrior'. Diarmuid preferred the name Cruadhlaoch over
his family name so he adopted it as his surname. Later this name became
O'Crowley, carrying the same prestige as the O'Connors and the McDermots.


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imbas
(@imbas)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 21
 

93 All,

To add to the above. Surnames as such did not exist in Ireland much before the 11th century. When they did come about, they were derived from an illustrious progenitor e.g Niall of the Nine Hostages and the surname O'Neill.

So Arzhel's post does make sense. The descendants of Dermot would have stressed their lineage and attachment to him by the adoption of his monicker " Cruadhlaoch".

There are two main sources on Irish surnames:
Edward MacLysaght's "Surnames of Ireland" & "Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall" by Patrick Woulfe.

Both concur with the above although a recent modern edition "Irish Surnames" by Sean Woulfe adds that the name Crowley may have also been derived from the Irish "Mac Roghallaigh", a minor sept of the Mahon clann in West Cork. I think that this is less likely.

Another recent publication "Family names of County Cork" (1985) by Diarmuid Ó Murchadha has a chapter on the Crowley name pp 107-113. He describes the Crowley clan as being the only family of Connaught extraction to gain an early foothold in Co. Cork. He also states that they were of the same royal stock as the O Conors and the Mac Dermots.

To cut a long story short, the Crowley's lost their traditional lands in Cork after the rebellion of 1641. Various members of the family tried to have the lands restored during the 17th and into the 18th century, but to no avail. Some though did take land on lease from the new landlords. Although County Cork continued to be their main area of habitation they were further scattered after the Williamite wars of the 1690's. One famous Crowley, Pedro Alonzo O Crowley, was a noted writer and antiquary who had a street in Cadiz, Spain, named in his honour.

Finally, it is interesting to note a regional difference in the pronunciation of the name "Crowley". Cork natives pronounce the "Crow" to rhyme with "Cow", whereas Dublin natives, or those who have left Cork for the bright lights of the city, will pronounce it "Crow" to rhyme with "Crow". The latter, I believe, is the accepted pronunciation as used by AC himself.

93 93/93


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daopig
(@daopig)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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I can see how the surname de Kerouille would soon become Crowley in Ireland or England, but whether The Prophet was just leg-pulling in his autohagiography, maybe somebody else knows for sure?


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Not to be too ultra-pedantic but the pronounciation issue has always intrigued me.

I've heard several versions of how the name was pronounced by those who knew AC personally, but agree than 'crow' is the most common and is the usual contemporary pronunciation in England.

In Ireland however 'Crow' is rarely used as the pronunciation and in fact, if used at all, tends to be used in Cork. I've found that Cork people split many names and have never found a suitable explanation for it. Thus Crowley can be 'crow' or pronounced to rhyme with 'cow' (the latter being the most common). Similarly, in Cork, Walsh is sometimes pronounced as written or pronounced as 'Welsh'. rather than a geographic or esoteric rationale, this seems to be based on the specific person being referred to.

Los


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imbas
(@imbas)
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Joined: 18 years ago
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The "crow" pronunciation would most definately be associated with a more anglophile or "higher" social status community in Ireland in contrast to the "cow" pronunciation which approximates more closely the original Gaelic surname.

Think old money in Cork or Dublin, or those who perhaps jumped shipped and joined the established Church (Church of Ireland) during times of political and social turmoil.

I have quite often heard the distinction being made, more often than not with ironic overtones in recent times.

Most Irish people will assume the pronunciation to rhyme with "cow"!

Holy Cow!


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daopig
(@daopig)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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wonder if Ozzy was from Ireland...hmm....


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