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AC to appear as character in YA novel; Jon Sewell's Rites of Eleusis completed; Baron von Warwickshire and the Adrenochrome Nun  

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djedi
(@djedi)
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Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 214
05/05/2020 8:29 pm  

A recent news article brought it to my attention that a fictionalized Aleister Crowley will appear in Jeff VanderMeer's upcoming teen & young adult sci fi novel, A Peculiar Peril. The article had this to say:

On his next book, A Peculiar Peril— “It’s the misadventures of Jonathan Lambshead, and there are a few different things going on. It’s kind of an epic fantasy but also set mostly on war on this alternate Earth where magic’s very wild and an alternate-Earth Aleister Crowley is running a Franco Germanic empire with a disembodied head of Napoleon as his military advisor. And Napoleon’s still having a thing about his height. He insists on being at the top of this pneumatic column that towers over everyone. And Charlemagne’s a character resurrected as a giant month and they’re talking marmots.”

You can read more about it on amazon.

Elsewhere, musician Jon Sewell has completed his final musical in the Rites of Eleusis cycle, the Rite of Saturn. Here's an article on Sewell and his undertaking on some website for people who LARP as pagans.

Finally, and maybe less interesting in the short term than the other news, Aleister Crowley was slandered as a quasi-satanic 'ritual abuser' in a supposedly enlightened article on paranoiacs who believe the rich and famous harvest adrenochrome from children and eat it, or whatever.

And there you have it folks, the AC news roundup. Only days apart is AC conceived as being a whimsical character you might introduce to your children, a serious mind and brilliant auteur, and a cannibalistic child rapist. Really makes you wonder what the world will end up thinking of the man, after the dust settles.


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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05/05/2020 8:50 pm  

That book sounds quite silly.  But thank you for the mention.

 

The other two seem even dumber.

 

His name gets flouted around in so much trash on the Net, it is almost as if the Looking Glass yellow press days were better. 

At least people could write better back then. 

 


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djedi
(@djedi)
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06/05/2020 9:45 pm  
Posted by: @christibrany

That book sounds quite silly.  But thank you for the mention. The other two seem even dumber.

I hadn't taken the time to watch the video in the second article, about the musical, but now I have and must say that you are correct in your assessment of it as dumb, and I might venture to opine that it is also egregiously bad and super gay.

As to the book, they just put up an excerpt of it. I scanned the chapter and found no mention of AC, but I didn't look very hard. I enjoy reading, but don't understand the concept of books written solely as entertainment, which comprises the entirety of what I've seen of the so-called 'teen & young adult' genre. (When I was a teenager I was reading Dostoyevsky and Goethe.) Even the pulp fiction and penny dreadfuls of Crowley's time had some modicum of artistic value, which is to say nothing of later arrivals like Clark Ashton Smith, Lovecraft, Howard et al.


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ignant666
(@ignant666)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 2665
06/05/2020 11:17 pm  
Posted by: @djedi

the so-called 'teen & young adult' genre

Based on what my son was assigned to read in middle school and high school until his senior year, most "'teen & young adult' genre" fiction is depressing pious PC shit about teens being oppressed, and marginalized, by race/sex/gender/disability (but seldom class).

The primary purpose of this body of writing seems to be to get kids depressed and/or suicidal. Heroism is verboten. Some really awful stuff.

Senior year they started getting real books, some even written before 1990.


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djedi
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07/05/2020 12:36 am  
Posted by: @ignant666

Based on what my son was assigned to read in middle school and high school until his senior year, most "'teen & young adult' genre" fiction is depressing pious PC shit about teens being oppressed, and marginalized, by race/sex/gender/disability (but seldom class).

Oh, absolutely. I would bet you probably refer to rags like Part-time Indian or Copper Sun, or maybe that any of that asswipe by SE Hinton if your son is older than I think. That's what I've been told they read in public school, anyway. I don't know anything about private schools.

Acquiescence to the will of others, and self-pity as a coping mechanism; that's all any unfortunate child could possibly learn from it. Whether this is intentional (which I doubt) or simply an aeonic trend, I see it as typical of the dying age. Compare the Isiac greek tragedies which, while dealing with even direr subject matter, understood the heroes' struggles as being life-affirming and triumphal over the pessimism or even nihilism taught by these books kids are made to read, and transfigured the viewer by the interplay of the Apollonian and the Dionysian upon the horrors presented.


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