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Aleister Crowley: A Night Inside the Great Pyramid of Egypt | Ancient Architects


ptoner
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Aleister Crowley: A Night Inside the Great Pyramid of Egypt | Ancient Architects

A youtuber I follow who always tries and looks at ancient monuments or anomalies from a different perspective. Worth a follow. 

 

"In my last video, I looked at some graffiti inside the Subterranean Chamber of Great Pyramid of Egypt, which looked to have an esoteric meaning mentioning a High Priest and High Priestess, Atlantis, Apollonius of Tyana, Apollo as well as other words I couldn’t make it. It was scrawled above the entrance to the chamber in March 1905 and one of the video comments said: “In my opinion, this could well be the handy work of Aleister Crowley, as he was in the Great Pyramid around this time, and performed rituals there.” Many other viewers made similar claims. The timing did seem about right and I knew that Aleister Crowley did go to Egypt some time after the turn of the 20th century, so this led me on another short research project. Could this writing actually be the handiwork of a man once called the “wickedest man in the world”? In this video, we take a look at the life of Aleister Crowley and we specifically take a detailed look at his night inside the Great Pyramid of Egypt on November 22nd 1903, on his honeymoon with his new bridge Rose Edith Crowley (nee Kelly). All images are taken from Google Images and the below sources for educational purposes only. Please subscribe to Ancient Architects, Like the video and please leave a comment below. Thank you."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwUqdvwmycQ

 


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toadstoolwe
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All I can remember about the King's chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza, were the crowds of tourists jostling around to get a better look at the huge stone broken saprophagous.  The only outstanding graffiti that I could see was from the great Italian Egyptologist Belzoni, who apparently used the charred end of a torch to inscribe his name and date. Incredibly, there were Ancient Greek graffiti from ancient tourists as well.  Today of course if you tried that, you would be promptly arrested by Egyptian police.  Back in the 1900s you could pretty do what you wanted, including looting artifacts.  I'll bet Crowley never admitted that he probably had to pay someone off for the privilege.


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Shiva
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

All I can remember about the King's chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza, were the crowds of tourists jostling around to get a better look at the huge stone broken saprophagous. 

This is very cool. Forget the tourists - at least you got to The Shrine that standeth in the Center of the Earth. I used to want to go there. You apparently didn't know the secret handshake or see the proper person about paying the proper fee. My one-time student, Frater Estar, arranged a trip to that chamber "after hours," for a small group, for the purpose of conducting a ceremony. I don't know how much it cost, and he never recounted  phenomena associated with that clever event.

I took the poor-man's journey to Palenque. The tourist line was long. It descended into a narrow, steep, slippery stairway (made of rocks). The rocks "sweated." The humidity must have been just at 100% (the jungle, you know). By the time I got down to the tomb, I couldn't see. The salt-sweat had infused my eyes. I saw the (duplicate) sarco stone through a filmy veil. To compensate for this blurry crisis scene, I stuck my camera through the bars. Later, I could see what I could not see.

Posted by: @toadstoolwe

I'll bet Crowley never admitted that he probably had to pay someone off for the privilege.

This is the way things are done in third-world countries. First-world, too, but it's trickier.


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ignant666
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Posted by: @shiva

the poor-man's journey to Palenque.

Me too, in 1984, tripping my gonads off on the local mushrooms, sold to me by the same friendly Indians who also sold me a a bow, and arrows with flint tips and parrot-feather fletching, still have 2 of them.

The most claustrophobic place i have ever been in, and indeed very humid.


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Shiva
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Posted by: @ignant666

The most claustrophobic place i have ever been in, and indeed very humid.

With the water condensing onto the rocks of the very narrow, very-very steep down-slanting tunnel, I failed to see how I was not going to slip. Interestingly, I was not concerned about people behind me - crashing into me (and others in front) as they cartwheeled down upon us.

Check it out ...

https://imgs.search.brave.com/4R2aZItNMFqV0bWtnUOJRMj1jKgUfRcXBL0K3QUx_5A/rs1/g:ce/aHR0cHM6Ly90c2Ux/Lm1tLmJpbmcubmV0/L3RoP2lkPU9JUC44/V2lmR3lWR25nSVA2/elpUc2tpb1BBSGFG/NyZwaWQ9QXBp

None of this (hallucinatory concern) happened.

 


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lashtal
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

All I can remember about the King's chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza, were the crowds of tourists jostling around to get a better look at the huge stone broken saprophagous.  The only outstanding graffiti that I could see was from the great Italian Egyptologist Belzoni, who apparently used the charred end of a torch to inscribe his name and date.

I fear you may misremember where you were. Belzoni's graffiti is in Khafre's pyramid, not the Great one. I have had the good fortune to enter both.

05 khafre belzoni

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LAShTAL


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toadstoolwe
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@lashtal That's awesome!  Sometimes when you travel abroad, there is so much too see in a very limited window of time, memories do tend to meld together.  If I had the resources, and a job I had to go back to, I would have stayed in Egypt for a couple more years.


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toadstoolwe
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@shiva Speaking of Palenque, I have been to Belize and toured the ruins and the pyramids of the Mayan.  Though much younger than Ancient Egyptians, it is no less fascinating.  Like the Ancient Egyptians, the Mayan were obsessive about time, and astronomy, tying their religion to the celestial and solar cycles.  I believe were it possible for an Ancient Egyptian  to visit the Mayan, he would have felt right at home. My favorite "Osirian" memory of my visit was a large stone sculpture of a giant bullfrog dislodging a Mayan King from it's mouth.  Zoomorphic resurrection perhaps?  I don't get me stated on the codices (Alamnacs) of the Mayan, simply psychedelic, only a priest could decipher them.

Getting back to Crowley and the Great Pyramid, I remember reading that the Egyptians themselves would bug the hell out of him selling their wares.  Believe me, they still do.  They also love photobombing.


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Shiva
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

the Egyptians themselves would bug the hell out of him selling their wares. 

I have hear about this. It seems it might be worse than in Mexico. My guru and here spouse, the Ip, on the road from Alexandria to Cairo, encountered a scene where a tourist's car had hit & killed a child. The locals merely cut the driver's head off and stuck it on a fence-post at the site. This is not about buying wares, but it illustrates what can happen.


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toadstoolwe
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@shiva I was in Egypt in 1998, just one year after the Luxor massacre.  Security was tight, Me and a friend of mine were taking a cruise on the Nile.  At every tourist site were armed Egyptian soldiers (AK-47s, steel helmets, loaded for bear, so to speak.  One of the crewmen of our boat would patrol the boat at night with a shot-gun.  They were not fooling around.  At the Old Cairo Museum of Antiquity, there were more armed soldiers.  By in large, the Egyptians were friendly and outgoing (I realize tourism is something their economy relies on, so yeah, they were friendly, and having tourists massacred would definitely effect their bottom line) On our tour bus, we had an Egyptian plainclothes agent.  He looked like Omar Shariff, a handsome guy for sure.  Over all I would say it was worth every little inconvenience.  It was hot, even by Egyptian standards, and I had a bout of diarrhea.  BUT it was worth it!  The temples, the Pyramids, Kom Ombo (Crocodopolis as Heroditus called it)

Anyway Shiva, if you want to walk the steps of the ancients, and Aleister Crowley, you  have to put going to Egypt on your bucket list.  You will not regret it.


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Shiva
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

you  have to put going to Egypt on your bucket list.

Sure. The bucket caught a hole in it a few years ago. There is nothing out there I have any desire to see in person.


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Alan_OBrien
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The most claustrophobic place i have ever been in, and indeed very humid.

Agreed. Getting IN to the centre must be a godawful journey; and one is thinking constantly that the return journey to get OUT is even worse.

Obviously AC was a great character: fearless, and non-vertiginous, non-claustrophobic.


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christibrany
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"In my last video, I looked at some graffiti inside the Subterranean Chamber of Great Pyramid of Egypt, which looked to have an esoteric meaning mentioning a High Priest and High Priestess, Atlantis, Apollonius of Tyana, Apollo as well as other words I couldn’t make it. It was scrawled above the entrance to the chamber in March 1905 and one of the video comments said: “In my opinion, this could well be the handy work of Aleister Crowley, as he was in the Great Pyramid around this time, and performed rituals there.” Many other viewers made similar claims. The timing did seem about right and I knew that Aleister Crowley did go to Egypt some time after the turn of the 20th century, so this led me on another short research project. Could this writing actually be the handiwork of a man once called the “wickedest man in the world”? 

Does anyone have a still image of this supposed Crowley an graffiti?

 

Never been in a pyramid on Earth myself, but have been in one on Mars...


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ptoner
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https://twitter.com/MattSibson/status/1519845462764830722

 


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christibrany
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@ptoner 

 

93 

Cheers Paul!

It may be a stretch but the style reminds me a lot of the painted capital/upper case letters AC painted in Cefalu.

 

93s


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Shiva
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Posted by: @alan_obrien

Agreed. Getting IN to the centre must be a godawful journey; and one is thinking constantly that the return journey to get OUT is even worse.

The journey to the edifice is easy. The tourist van takes you there. Getting IN to the core shrine (equivalent to the King's chamber at Giza) is the hairy part - it's a steep downhill slope, dripping with slippery moisture. One has the feeling they might slip-tumble down at any moment. There seems to be a gravity source just in front of you that is pulling you towards the person in front of, and lelow, you. But nobody falls.

Coming back up, I only have one memory - the air was getting fresher with every step, and the light was getting brighter. No sense of slipping or tipping. At least that was my version.

You need not take my word for anything. I have proven proof in the form of evidence. I shot the trip on 8mm film. Converted to video, it;s fuzzy (but viewable), and jumpy (here and there), but whatta trip!  The descent (from the top of the "temple" - and subsequent re-ascent - is not included. A person would be nuts to hold a camera while walking downhill.  (15 min. video: Mexico City - Pyramids (Teotehuican) - Palenque ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch - Palenque

 


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