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Aleister Crowley Created the 60s Peace Movement!  

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ptoner
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09/03/2015 8:00 am  

Aleister Crowley Created the 60s Peace Movement!

The questions that plagued us were:

~How could the home planet of the Beatles have produced the extreme evil that was Aleister Crowley?

~How was it that the only ‘good,’ passive, nonviolent period in modern times on Earth, a time of peace that ended an ‘insane war,’ was orchestrated by the most evil man (still) alive?

~Beatles (Paul, John, George and Ringo) and their entire management and handlers were utterly controlled like puppets by a demon to bring on the Aquarian Age. How could the ‘new information’ possibly be true?

I was sent to find out. There were millions of people back at home base that anxiously waited years for my final report. I was expected to discover the answers and after multiple ‘extractions,’ I did just that. But no one will believe my report. I needed the last piece to the grand enigma and what I found was startling. I uncovered the stunning truth from the subconscious of 16 human beings. Cross-reference patterns all correlated.

Aleister Crowley executed a severely dramatic turnaround and was the actual architect of the 60s Peace Movement (through the Beatles) during the Vietnam War. WHY? Why would Evil do that? How could a ‘man’ that motivated Mussolini, Stalin and Hitler have twisted his darkness toward peace, love and light? We had to know.

And now, I do. I’m one of the few beings who really know the truth.

http://blog.world-mysteries.com/guest_authors/doug-yurchey/aleister-crowley-created-the-60s-peace-movement/


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Michael Staley
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09/03/2015 9:45 am  

I'm sorry to have wasted a few minutes of my life reading this supposedly humorous piece.

The chap in the Fez behind Diana Dors on the 'Seargent Pepper' cover looks to me more like Gurdjieff than like Crowley.


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SatansAdvocaat
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09/03/2015 5:25 pm  
"Michael Staley" wrote:
I'm sorry to have wasted a few minutes of my life reading this supposedly humorous piece.

Now this one IS utter nonsense.  Couldn't agree more Michael.


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Anonymous
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11/03/2015 12:43 am  

Kinsey, Leary, Huxley, Jones, Lennon, Jagger, Barrett, Bowie, Page, 60's , Results.


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Michael Staley
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11/03/2015 1:44 am  

Results of what?


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Shiva
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12/03/2015 5:21 pm  

Results of a popular medicine:

"1966 was the beginning of the Mother of All UFO Waves, which lasted throughout 1966 and 1967.  Correlation Note  -  A massive first wave of legal LSD-25 entered the bodies and minds of an entire generation of humanity - at the same time that a massive wave of radar-visible UFO sightings was being played out in the world's skies." - ISLBTV


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jamie barter
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12/03/2015 8:35 pm  

Quite apart from anything else in this most ridiculous piece, it’s amazing that there still seems to be some mileage in the whole ”Paul Is Dead” myth, even though (mildly entertaining conspiracy theory though it was) it was evidentially disproved decades ago. 

Put-ons aside, can there actually really be people who truly believe in all this stuff?

Norma N Joy Conquest


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Anonymous
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13/03/2015 7:32 pm  

all those people I listed knew of AC. I was just responding to the the thread topic above.


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Shiva
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13/03/2015 8:12 pm  
"TreeDragon7" wrote:
all those people I listed knew of AC. I was just responding to the the thread topic above.

Yeah, and it's possible that he had some influence on them. Of course, I dunno that it should be called the "Peace Movement," but that's what it is known as. And it did revolve around demonstrations against the Vietnam war. And the everlasting symbol of those imes was the "peace symbol" ...


In the 1950s the "peace sign", as it is known today,
was designed as the logo for the British Campaign
for Nuclear Disarmament
and adopted by anti-war
and counterculture activists in the United States and elsewhere.[/align:jgnxoj7f]

I first saw that symbol when a friend showed it to me in the late '50s. "What's it mean?" I asked. He replied, "Ban the Bomb!"

OK, so what was that "peace" (hippie) movement really about. It seems it had more to do with young folks insisting on their individuality than promoting peace. But "peace" was certainly a part of it. And, of course, that emphatic individuality read just like a page out of O.M.'s introduction to Liber Al.

"The New Aeon

"The third chapter of the Book is difficult to understand, and may be very repugnant to many people born before the date of the book (April, 1904). (and maybe even after that - ed)

"Now, Horus, the child, in which we come to perceive events as a continual growth partaking in its elements of both these methods, and not to be overcome by circumstance. This present period involves the recognition of the individual as the unit of society.

"Observe for yourselves the decay of the sense of sin, the growth of innocence and irresponsibility, the strange modifications of the reproductive instinct with a tendency to become bisexual or epicene, the childlike confidence in progress combined with nightmare fear of catastrophe, against which we are yet half unwilling to take precautions.

"We are children."[/align:jgnxoj7f]

So, we don't know that AC "created" the peace movement. But he certainly does seem to have shown some insight into it, and he certainly had some influence on the prime movers of that lost era.

Oh yeah! The Establishment didn't like it at all ...
[/align:jgnxoj7f]


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Anonymous
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13/03/2015 10:37 pm  

You could even argue that, ultimately, American capitalism created the peace movement. 

The post World War Two generations had more financial independence/power and arrogance due to American industrial growth instigated by their parents (the birth of a new species known as  "the teenager").  This created more loosening of the ties from the Ike generation.  The metaphysical orientalist "drop out" movement was, ironically enough the result of that new found material comfort and well being.  It was recreationism and a hedonistic reaction against being drafted to fight a people who were not really a threat to American interests anyway(the communist vietnamese).  However I'd say that the racial  civil rights movement set an example of defiance against traditional attitudes.     

What's interesting is once again in this era, America embarks on silly wars against imaginary enemies but there's no big peace movement.  Why?  Most likely because the economy is not booming and jobs and material comforts appear more uncertain.     


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Michael Staley
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13/03/2015 10:48 pm  
"TreeDragon7" wrote:
all those people I listed knew of AC. I was just responding to the the thread topic above.

Yes, but doubtless they all knew of many other people as well. I still don't see your point.


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Shiva
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14/03/2015 1:09 am  
"david" wrote:
... financial independence/power and arrogance due to American industrial growth instigated by their parents ... loosening of the ties from the Ike generation.

Yup! Tell me about it. Like I told it ISLBTV:

"Dwight D. Eisenhower, the eternal warrior-king, had served as the Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces ("The Lords of Light") in Europe, and he was the first Supreme Commander of NATO. Then he became President of The United States, ruling over the Eisenhower-era of my golden youth."

"I was raised in this post-war, atomic new-age, American environment within an intact, upper middle class, Lutheran family.  I went to Sunday School and learned about Jesus."

"My father, an engineer, was employed by one of those corporations that was part of the military industrial complex and he had a "top secret" security clearance."

"As the golden Eisenhower-era came to an end, I went away to another college: The School of Dentistry. Our curriculum included physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology and a constant, clinical administration of the most potent pharmaceuticals available to man.
One day in 1963, as we were standing in the grand entrance hall of The School of Dentistry, Frater Shem asked me, "Have you heard about this new drug LSD?"
"No, what about it?" I asked back.
"It makes you schizophrenic," was his answer.
Well isn't that just dandy, I thought, putting the matter completely out of my mind. 😮

... reaction against being drafted to fight a people who were not really a threat to American interests anyway (the communist vietnamese).

I was given to understand that o-i-l was involved ... not the Abramelin variety. But I don't think that worked out for anybody in the long run. Everyone I knew was trying to get out of the draft. I was exempt because I had already served my military duty (whew! close call, that).

What's interesting is once again in this era, America embarks on silly wars against imaginary enemies but there's no big peace movement.

Um, o-i-l ? ???

Well, anyway, now there's IS threatening to come after us devil-worshipers, and they're so nasty that one would have to think thrice before mounting a peace movement to protect them.

Your observations seem to be correct, and I'm not an armchair historian ... I was there.


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Anonymous
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14/03/2015 11:06 am  
"Shiva" wrote:
Well, anyway, now there's IS threatening to come after us devil-worshipers, and they're so nasty that one would have to think thrice before mounting a peace movement to protect them.

Your observations seem to be correct, and I'm not an armchair historian ... I was there.

Thanks.

As for IS. No, this is  a very recent development brought on by those silly wars.  Silly wars which instigated the breakdown of sectarian containment in Iraq.  Ally that to the bloody revolution of the Arab Spring and we have  a power vacuum.  Ironically this power vacuum filled by extremist bigot-barbarians IS does now call for just military intervention because the situation is that serious but now America is fed up with war.  This will change when/ if (?) there is a new Republican government. 


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Shiva
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14/03/2015 2:42 pm  
"david" wrote:
As for IS. No, this is  a very recent development brought on by those silly wars.

When I was young, several decades ago, I read that we (the Western civilization, the "world" actually) should be aware that Islam, the sleeping giant, could become a massive threat IF they ever got motivated by a single leader. But no "single leader" (the Mahdi) arose and we saw Islam torn by internal strife ... but now, various splinter groups are coming closer to unity, what with assorted groups pledging alliegance to the popular IS.

Note: "In Islamic eschatology, the Mahdi ("guided one") is the prophesied redeemer of Islam who will rule for seven, nine, or nineteen years (according to differing interpretations) before the Day of Judgment, literally, the Day of Resurrection, and will rid the world of evil."

Holy cow 😮  That "evil" is us - and all those infidels like us.

Silly wars which instigated the breakdown of sectarian containment in Iraq.

The first war was to contain Saddam's actual aggression toward (the oil fields of) Kuwait. Borderline justified ... but then Bush the First failed to finish the job. Why? Again, I was given to understand that without Saddam's central control, the whole area would erupt in wild, inter-tribal warfare. We all watched as Bush the Second launched a second war over (imagined or invented) nuclear weapons. That was "silly," nay, stupid, and we all knew (well, suspected) that it was not true. And now the whole area has erupted in wild, inter-tribal warfare.

We now see IS promoting concepts right out of AL's third chapter ... while we (the West) try to enforce "political correctness." ::)

Although AC was probably not the father of the peace movement (but his ideas were involved), it can be seen that his other ideas are reflected in the current war. Let's not praise or blame AC - after all, a "successful" prophet merely voices the subconcious promptings of the collective unconscious ... the shape of things to come.


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jamie barter
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14/03/2015 4:31 pm  

It is a little hard to conceive of A.C. being considered as having been the “creator” of the 1960s, or indeed any, peace movement.  His default disposition was not one of pacifism by any means (unlike Gandhi, Shaw and Martin Luther King for example), and he fully recognised the inevitable necessity for international conflict – in the early stages of World War 2 taking an almost gleeful delight in informing his one-time German disciple and representative Matha Kuntzel, that Britain would “knock Hitler for six!”

Furthermore, Crowley fully accepted that Horus was a God of War – of course the polar opposite to Peace - and that the Aeon of Ra Hoor Khuit would therefore necessitate much of the former with all of its inevitable bloodthirstiness and atrocities, and War is at least one of the Horsemen of the Apocalypse from the "old black time" who has not had to come to face redundancy in the New Aeon.  A.C. also informed Lieutenant McMurtry of the United States armed forces, that he regarded it as a good thing that any future leader of the O.T.O. should be “bloodied” in the direct course of their experience – that is, to have personally themselves come through armed conflict as a result of wartime activities.  So, no, it is difficult to reconcile all of this with his at the same time being, albeit unconsciously, the figurehead or motivator of a later worldwide peace movement.

This is all part of the tendency to perceive A.C. as having been in a way some sort of Victorian proto-hippy and of an “anything goes”/“drop out” sort of mentality.  It was John Symonds, I think, who remarked that the “children of the 60s” would have found themselves highly uncomfortable in the disapproving presence of the Beast, in that he would have been broadly contemptuous of and not at all sympathetic with their way of thinking, finding them for the most part to be indolent and hedonistically undisciplined, naively left-wing and of pronounced arrested development with an indeed "child-like" state of consciousness. 

"... I shall deal hardly with them." (Liber AL I:3)

N Joy


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Shiva
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14/03/2015 5:32 pm  
"jamie barter" wrote:
... the “children of the 60s” would have found themselves highly uncomfortable in the disapproving presence of the Beast ...

As a "child" of the '60s, I have often commented that the feeling would be mutual. I was not part of any "peace movement," nor of the hippie paradigm. I enjoyed reading his books and following out his [s:2x3whu92]ordeals[/s:2x3whu92], um, practices, but I doubt that we would have gotten along for long.


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Anonymous
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15/03/2015 3:42 pm  

he'd probably be low profile on a commune in rural Oregon or in a gay club by the end of the 60's


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Michael Staley
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15/03/2015 11:05 pm  
"TreeDragon7" wrote:
he'd probably be low profile on a commune in rural Oregon or in a gay club by the end of the 60's

Or more probably freaking out to Pink Floyd at the Middle Earth club in Covent Garden, London.

A bit more likely than hanging out in Oregan, probably.

Who are we talking about, by the way? Just as a matter of idle curiosity?


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Anonymous
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16/03/2015 10:40 am  
"Shiva" wrote:
"jamie barter" wrote:
... the “children of the 60s” would have found themselves highly uncomfortable in the disapproving presence of the Beast ...

As a "child" of the '60s, I have often commented that the feeling would be mutual. I was not part of any "peace movement," nor of the hippie paradigm. I enjoyed reading his books and following out his [s:c6xt1lop]ordeals[/s:c6xt1lop], um, practices, but I doubt that we would have gotten along for long.

Do you think if the big black cloud of the draft-lottery was hanging over your head that this may've made you an anti-war demonstrator?


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Shiva
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16/03/2015 2:41 pm  
"david" wrote:
Do you think if the big black cloud of the draft-lottery was hanging over your head that this may've made you an anti-war demonstrator?

Objection, your honor!  Calls for speculation ::)


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jamie barter
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16/03/2015 5:27 pm  
"Michael Staley" wrote:
"TreeDragon7" wrote:
he'd probably be low profile on a commune in rural Oregon or in a gay club by the end of the 60's

Or more probably freaking out to Pink Floyd at the Middle Earth club in Covent Garden, London.

Who are we talking about, by the way? Just as a matter of idle curiosity?

I don’t suppose we could be talking about Gerald Suster? ??? ;D

Gerald used to inform me that in his mis-spent youth as a sixteen year old he used to like to partake of lysergic on a sugarcube “at the door” when he went to go and see Syd Barrett’s Pink Floyd at Middle Earth and also at the UFO club, then in the Tottenham Court Road, itself a stone’s throw up from Covent Garden.  I have no reason to suspect him of telling porkie-pies on these occasions.  Curiously enough, although he never struck me otherwise as being a particularly regular gig-goer, he showed a knack for having his finger on the pulse and being in the right place at the right time by also going to see the original Sex Pistols almost exactly ten years later in the same vicinity.

Anyway - back to the peace movement?

Waving my freak flag high,
N Joy


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Anonymous
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16/03/2015 7:50 pm  

Crowley. I don't think I'd want him over at my house though lol


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Michael Staley
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16/03/2015 9:35 pm  
"TreeDragon7" wrote:
Crowley. I don't think I'd want him over at my house though lol

I don't think he'd want to come, do you?


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Anonymous
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16/03/2015 9:59 pm  

I cant think speak or walk for him at all ! can you ?

This might be totally off topic but im gonna take this moment to say goodbye to the website. I've learned a lot about Magick over the time here but am Not gonna miss the little lashings and lurkers. I feel like ive outgrown it. So, I wish Paul and many many other people that have created what is probably the best Thelemic galaxy online. May it continue for the rest of the Aeon. Thanks for 10 great years !

93's , James Ryan Almond


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jamie barter
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17/03/2015 5:31 pm  

There was an erratum at the end of my Reply #15.  The quote there was not from Liber AL I:3 but III:3, if anyone not that familiar with the text was a little perplexed.  In fact, while I’m pointing this out the following is also relevant to the issue & to the verse which I originally mentioned way back (hich is buried in the labyrinth of the lash under Reply #55 of my own Introduction):

There is no getting away from the fact that Horus, or more specifically Ra Hoor Khuit, can be a most altogether horrible bastard and one mean dude, to use the vernacular.  There is no doubt that he is a god of War and that the 20th century has been choc-full of them, so I won't get involved in the New-Age niceties of trying to explain "War" in terms of anything other than bloody conflict and painful opposition, nor that Chapter 3 does not involve intimations of the most awful suffering and violence.  However I think Vengeance possibly means corrective "Adjustment", by force majeure if necessary, of refractory elements to the correct balance of the Divine and Universal Will.  But I think the most apt, accurate, and yes beautiful description of this 'terrible' image of RHK which I have ever seen is this little extract which appears at the end of Chapter 6 of "The Egyptian Revival" (1923) by Frater Achad (Charles Stansfeld Jones):

Horus appears as the avenger Apophis to those who try to Go Back, or retrogress.  He has to destroy them in order that they may be renewed.  But as long as we go forward, we travel with the Ever Coming Son, who is after all our Destiny, since He is within each of us as the True Urge of our Being.  This, then, is the secret of the Way of the TAO; step boldly out on the Path of Destiny, having aligned the personal with the Divine Will, and thus prepared oneselves for the acceptance of that destiny. Keep ahead of the urge from behind, and it will not fret us.

Then we become Free, Goers, Doing the Will of God upon Earth, Ever-Coming Sons of God.

But if we attempt to lag behind to carry out some personal whims and wishes, Destiny catches up with us and forces us on.  To those who wilfully turn back and seek to avoid cooperating with the Divine Plan, Horus is the Great Avenger.  Has he not said "I am a God of War and of Vengeance.  I will deal hardly with them." [sic]

Thus at his coming in 1904 he found the Race in a state of definite retrogression.  "Civilization" met him as he advanced in triumph, and millions fell, without understanding what was happening.  He still drives ahead in his Chariot, and millions more will feel his Force and Fire, until the Race recognizes that it must right about face, and cheer the Conquering Hero on.  Then we shall have Peace and Rejoicing, and the Stern Warrior will seem as the Gentlest Child. [My emphases.]


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jamie barter
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17/03/2015 5:37 pm  
"TreeDragon7" wrote:
This might be totally off topic but im gonna take this moment to say goodbye to the website. [...]

Ave atque vale.

“We reject you, we reject you, Not one of us, Not…”

Only joking there, TreeDragon7/James!  Seriously, go in peace brother. 😀  Or, to adapt that Nimoyism: “Live long, desire death evermuch & prosper accordingly”...

N Joy


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lashtal
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17/03/2015 10:58 pm  
"TreeDragon7" wrote:
This might be totally off topic but im gonna take this moment to say goodbye to the website. I've learned a lot about Magick over the time here but am Not gonna miss the little lashings and lurkers. I feel like ive outgrown it. So, I wish Paul and many many other people that have created what is probably the best Thelemic galaxy online. May it continue for the rest of the Aeon. Thanks for 10 great years !

Thanks for your participation on the site and I wish you well wherever the Great Work takes you, James.

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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