Notifications
Clear all

Braveheart and Aleister Crowley  

  RSS

lashtal
(@lashtal)
Owner and Editor Admin
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 5304
24/10/2007 1:05 pm  

This from Filmstalker:

The writer of Braveheart, that rousing Scottish film, Randall Wallace is set to direct a film about Arthur Conan Doyle and a secret society called The Arcanum.

The story not only has Arthur Conan Doyle but also Harry Houdini, H.P. Lovecraft, Aleister Crowley and Marie Laveau as members of the society and is set in 1919.

The news comes from Reuters through Yahoo News and tells us that the film is adapted from the novel by Thomas Wheeler. His novel, of the same name, tells of these great names of the past who try to protect the world against an evil force.

Randall Wallace previously adapted the Atlas Shrugged novel for the Angelina Jolie starring film, and directed the superb We Were Soldiers with Mel Gibson (let's not mention Pearl Harbor). He's currently working on the C.S. Lewis story The Screwtape Letters.

Now Wallace's credentials are good, and despite mediocre reviews for the novel, the concept for The Arcanum sounds a very interesting one, taking these historical figures and weaving a story around them. Would it interest you? Have you read the novel?

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


Quote
wulfram
(@wulfram)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 137
24/10/2007 2:19 pm  

The Arcanum conjures up images of far better novels, such as The List of Seven by Mark Frost ot Umberto Eco's Foucault's Pendulum, but all in all it was an enjoyable read.

Wheeler tends to write the characters as he wishes they were rather than as they actually were and his dialogue is a bit too modern. His greatest failure is in the character of Marie Laveau who, I believe was already passed on by this time and not one for travelling outside of New Orleans.

Still, I'll see the movie as I did enjoy much of the book. For a debut novel, it was quite impressive in its ambition.

Along with Old Crow, who has a mere cameo and is not a member of the Order, but one who is consulted by the band of heroes, A.E. Waite too makes an appearance.

I'll recommend the book to anyone who enjoys a good yarn and has the ability to look past the inconsistancies.


ReplyQuote
gurugeorge
(@gurugeorge)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 456
25/10/2007 1:13 am  
"lashtal" wrote:
This from Filmstalker:

The writer of Braveheart, that rousing Scottish film, Randall Wallace is set to direct a film about Arthur Conan Doyle and a secret society called The Arcanum.

The story not only has Arthur Conan Doyle but also Harry Houdini, H.P. Lovecraft, Aleister Crowley and Marie Laveau as members of the society and is set in 1919.

The news comes from Reuters through Yahoo News and tells us that the film is adapted from the novel by Thomas Wheeler. His novel, of the same name, tells of these great names of the past who try to protect the world against an evil force.

Randall Wallace previously adapted the Atlas Shrugged novel for the Angelina Jolie starring film, and directed the superb We Were Soldiers with Mel Gibson (let's not mention Pearl Harbor). He's currently working on the C.S. Lewis story The Screwtape Letters.

Now Wallace's credentials are good, and despite mediocre reviews for the novel, the concept for The Arcanum sounds a very interesting one, taking these historical figures and weaving a story around them. Would it interest you? Have you read the novel?

Sounds interesting, I'd definitely go and see it, if only for AC's cameo. It also sounds a bit like some of Michael Moorcock's yarns, or Alan Moore's League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. That kind of Victoriana idea has been used quite a bit (even recently in Doctor Who!). Victorians are pretty cool in some ways 🙂 One of the coolest ideas in Neal Stephenson's s-f masterpiece The Diamond Age is the idea of future "neo-Victorians", and he talks about Victorians understanding the increase of willpower that comes from the right kind of restriction, almost in Crowleyan terms. Neo-Victorianism is definitely coming soon, methinks.

Coincidentally, I'm reading at the moment a couple of books by a great contemporary s-f writer, Charles Stross, whose books are mostly high concept hard-sf to do with the Singularity and post-Singularity (a kind of geek Rapture idea, taking Moore's law as its basis), but he's also written a couple of cracking books about the adventures of a hacker-cum-spook-cum-magician, working for the Laundry, a magic-using, but comically bureaucratic department of the British secret service dedicated to secretly preserving us from the incursion of Lovecraftian horrors. The magick in these books is given an interesting, quite geeky Platonic/mathematical basis.

See The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue.


ReplyQuote
Share: