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'How to tell an Englishman from an American' in Lilliput Magazine 110  

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ptoner
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13/12/2013 12:55 pm  

'How to tell an Englishman from an American' in Lilliput Magazine Issue 110

Never heard of this article by AC, would be an interesting read, I am sure.

113. CROWLEY, Aleister: 'How to tell an Englishman from an American' in Lilliput Magazine Issue 110. London: August 1946.

FIRST PUBLISHED EDITION. Small magazine in pictorial wraps. 164 pages.

A little very light soiling to covers, small ink name to first page. Crowley's short humorous piece is on page 147. £35.00

http://www.occultandesoterica.com/113-englishman-american-crowley.htm


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ptoner
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13/12/2013 2:30 pm  

Here is the text, for anyone interested.

http://www.100thmonkeypress.com/biblio/acrowley/periodicals/tell_an_englishman/englishman.htm


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Hamal
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13/12/2013 5:24 pm  

OK I read it…. but my sense of humour muscle hasn't even twitched. The door swung open and tumble-weed rolled through the room, all expression dropped from my face…. I must be English!

::)
93
Hamal


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ptoner
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13/12/2013 5:51 pm  

Exactly the same response from me Hamal. Deadpan.

Sent from my C6903 using Tapatalk


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fama_fraternitatis
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13/12/2013 6:24 pm  

Me too - I'm the person who has it up for sale and I didn't know what else to describe at as. I think I'll put quotation marks around "humorous"...


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Hamal
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13/12/2013 7:08 pm  

That's a fair price though

"fama_fraternitatis" wrote:
Me too - I'm the person who has it up for sale and I didn't know what else to describe at as. I think I'll put quotation marks around "humorous"...

LOL.

93
Hamal


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belmurru
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13/12/2013 8:04 pm  

I have to admit I laughed out loud (at the "he-man's" response to the city-fella, not Tree's comment, which was funny too). I must be American!

I'm actually Canadian, but close enough (I lived there for ten years, saw a lot of it, so maybe there is something to that "osmosis" idea...)


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lashtal
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13/12/2013 8:30 pm  

Published by John Symonds, I believe.

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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fama_fraternitatis
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13/12/2013 11:06 pm  

Good point Paul. John Symonds was the editor for a time, but I believe during wartime - there is no editor's name in this issue, so I can't say for sure. Would make for an obvious connection though...


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Hamal
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14/12/2013 12:08 am  

Well it will make a nice little addition to someone's collection I'm sure. Me I have to resist buying everything Crowley related… I've yet to give in to AC mugs and t-shirts…. though I did admire some buttons!  😀

::)
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Hamal


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Los
 Los
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14/12/2013 2:41 am  

Thanks for this. I had never read that before. I didn't laugh, but I found it amusing, and I think a lot of the humor must come from the delivery.


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William Thirteen
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15/12/2013 11:34 am  

Despite my years abroad, I now see I am still hopelessly amerikun....


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michaelclarke18
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15/12/2013 1:50 pm  

Some really nice books on the Blair Cowl website.

http://www.occultandesoterica.com/aleister-crowley.htm


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jamie barter
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16/12/2013 12:19 pm  

My sense of humour muscle creased, but more at the absurdity of it all I think.  Clearly the he-man had changed his mind about the Post Office, just like the would-be good city-Samaritan did about telling him where it was.  Nothing terribly funny about that; but I am an Englishman, of course.  Maybe some of our transatlantic readers are all hooting away!?

And while we’re at it, maybe they were both “damn rude” (Tree's verdict) – not that I could tell, particularly – but what makes that risible?

Wanting to find it uproarously funny but unable to,
Norma N. Joy Conquest


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belmurru
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16/12/2013 1:27 pm  
"jamie barter" wrote:
Clearly the he-man had changed his mind about the Post Office, just like the would-be good city-Samaritan did about telling him where it was. 

I guess this illustrates the transatlantic difference in sensibilities. When the All-American He-Man (think Beverley Hillbillies type of wise peasant) said "No", I read it as him having played a joke on the city slicker all along. The city boy thought he had made fun of the country boy, but it was the other way around.

And while we’re at it, maybe they were both “damn rude” (Tree's verdict) – not that I could tell, particularly – but what makes that risible?

Does explaining what makes a joke funny ever get a belated laugh - one that is deep and sincere, rather than something like yours, "Well, I guess it could be funny in a way, now that you explain the mechanism. Ha ha. Thanks"?


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jamie barter
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16/12/2013 2:24 pm  
"belmurru" wrote:
"jamie barter" wrote:
Clearly the he-man had changed his mind about the Post Office, just like the would-be good city-Samaritan did about telling him where it was. 

I guess this illustrates the transatlantic difference in sensibilities. When the All-American He-Man (think Beverley Hillbillies type of wise peasant) said "No", I read it as him having played a joke on the city slicker all along. The city boy thought he had made fun of the country boy, but it was the other way around.

And while we’re at it, maybe they were both “damn rude” (Tree's verdict) – not that I could tell, particularly – but what makes that risible?

Does explaining what makes a joke funny ever get a belated laugh - one that is deep and sincere, rather than something like yours, "Well, I guess it could be funny in a way, now that you explain the mechanism. Ha ha. Thanks"?

Belmurru, I found your last posting funnier than the whole 'joke'!

N Joy


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belmurru
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16/12/2013 3:53 pm  

Humor doesn't just vary from person to person or culture to culture, but also within a person, depending on the context.

I remember the first time I saw an episode of Absolutely Fabulous (I was in the States), and the first scene had Edie waking up disheveled, face in pillow, booze by the bed - you can surely picture the scene - and although the laugh track was on cue, I was shocked and felt pity for her. I didn't know what was funny about an alcoholic.

I got with it pretty quickly - it's one of my favourite comedy shows of all time -, but my shock at this first scene ever has stuck with me as an example of how our humo(u)r changes with context. It's hard to tell whether something is comedy or tragedy sometimes, and I think that is very profound. 


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ignant666
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17/12/2013 1:48 am  

Since this has turned into something of a poll on how effective AC's test may be, and since I am today apparently on some sort of end-of-semester posting jag, I will chime in to say I thought the story was pretty funny- though I did not laugh audibly, I did become amused.
I am, needless to say given the above, American.
Have we had an exception to AC's proposed rule yet? I think not; of course some contrarian will claim to lack his/her characteristic national reaction shortly.
Perhaps reaction to this story may in fact be an effective shibboleth?
Two more data points: my wife (Brazilian, and thus outside the proposed dichotomy ) was baffled by the idea that this was funny, as was my son, but then he has dual nationality and thus may not be a "real hundred-percent American".


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belmurru
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17/12/2013 9:09 am  

One question though - did Crowley laugh?

It was he who styled it "the funniest story in the world", so it seems that either Crowley breaks the mould, or the joke lies elsewhere - perhaps in Tree's response? Or even outside the narrative itself - in the fact that it does seem to provoke such different reactions? (but then, while I find that somewhat interesting, I don't find it funny, much less the funniest thing I have ever come across. Laughter is release, after all, provoked by the sudden resolution of tension, anticipation, or reversal of expectations (paraprosdokian), and it is quite to be expected that the "national" senses of humo(u)r differ, so I don't know how it is supposed to provoke laughter. On the other hand, Crowley might mean something else by "funny").


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steve_wilson
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17/12/2013 1:55 pm  

I think that this is a story told to ridicule Beerbohm Tree


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