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Ken Russell is Aleister Crowley?  

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spike418
(@spike418)
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15/03/2011 1:02 pm  

As a Facebook "friend" of Ken Russell I was intrigued to find this posted.

http://www.imperiumpictures.com/portfolio-item/ken-russell-is-aleister-crowley/

Google does not seem able to supply any further info and I wondered if any Lashtalians could shed any light? 😯


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christibrany
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15/03/2011 1:25 pm  

liber nutz! add an entry...
Not as bad as this one though: http://www.aleisterinwonderland.com/2011/01/18/the-sound-of-silence-kenneth-grant/
all kinds of nuts. pecans almonds peanuts cashews....


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sandyboy
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16/03/2011 1:39 pm  

😈
I imagine this is one of Russell's homemade shorts which he is mostly confined to these days as no-one wants to finance his kind of films today, sadly. Most of his work is not out on dvd - even though the cut footage from The Devils was located by critic Mark Kermode years ago, Warners have not restored it and the film is only out as a bootleg. As I'm writing an article on Crowley In Film for Diabolique magazine I've emailed Imperium to ask for further info on Ken as AC and will post here if I hear anything. I obviously know about Anger, Curse Of The Demon, The Black Cat, The Magician and even the pic on the wall in Hellraiser 2, but info on more obscure Crowley film references gratefully received.


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 Anonymous
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16/03/2011 2:36 pm  

Liber AL makes an appearance in the film "Ruby Cairo".


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 Anonymous
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16/03/2011 3:26 pm  

An unsettling example from The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8Xgm1u_SF4


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joe93
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16/03/2011 10:06 pm  

Obscure film references? Unless I hallucinated it years ago, Crowley's face appears in Stephen Frears' Gumshoe (1971) with Albert Finney, and again in Brian Jones biopic Stoned (think this has been mentioned on LAShTAL before). And how's about a Trevor Howard film which mentions "Ipsissimus"? That'll be Viv Stanshall's Sir Henry at Rawlinson's End (1980). The "phallacies of Crowley" are mentioned in the book-of-the-film but not in the final cut.


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Palamedes
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17/03/2011 4:23 am  

I believe that Crowley is also mentioned in the film "Cecil B. Demented."


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elitemachinery
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21/03/2011 7:22 am  
"christibrany" wrote:
liber nutz! add an entry...
Not as bad as this one though: http://www.aleisterinwonderland.com/2011/01/18/the-sound-of-silence-kenneth-grant/
all kinds of nuts. pecans almonds peanuts cashews....

My family thinks i'm crazy. Now LASHTAL.com thinks i'm crazy too? Par for the course I guess.


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 Anonymous
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21/03/2011 9:31 pm  

Ken Russell a number of years ago wrote and produced a short Radio 3 play which fictionally featured Crowley's Ragged ragtime girls' escapade to Russia.

Oliver Reed played the part of Crowley and the climax was something to behold, as Crowley attempts to perform a black mass with the help of Russian composer Alexander Scriabin in Moscow's Saint Basil's Cathedral.

If my memory serves me right i'm sure a goat was involved somewhere along the line.


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lashtal
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21/03/2011 10:26 pm  
"micomax" wrote:
Ken Russell a number of years ago wrote and produced a short Radio 3 play which fictionally featured Crowley's Ragged ragtime girls' escapade to Russia.

Source: The Independent - London
Date: 24 June 1995
Author: DAVID BENEDICT

THE RADIO PLAY

THE DEATH OF ALEXANDER SCRIABIN: After endless films, TV and a few operas, Ken Russell presented his first radio play in which Scriabin, the composer of the Black Mass, and occultist Aleister Crowley meet up in Moscow. Unsurprisingly, the play starred Oliver Reed. There is an unsubstantiated rumour that Glenda Jackson would have been in it were she not busy in Westminster

The Times considered it splendid: "Most of the audience will have clung on throughout, not least for the texture of the writingand Reed's superb delivery." The Daily Telegraph disagreed: "A ripe packet of tosh"

Masochists should scour the Radio Times for a repeat. For a better guide to Ken Russell, rent the video of Women in Love or the ludicrously wonderful The Boyfriend

A mercilessly accurate parody of all of Russell's worst excesses. A whistle- stop tour of music, sex, orthodox religion, over-the-top acting and cannibalism

See: http://www.lashtal.com/nuke/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&p=15061

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lashtal
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21/03/2011 10:28 pm  

From The Independent…

Radioreview: THE DEATH OF ALEXANDER SCRIABIN Radio 3
Tuesday, 20 June 1995

It's hard to pinpoint when it was that Ken Russell drifted over the line into self-parody. There's always been an air of parody about his films, which I put down to two reasons. First, he refuses, more or less on principle, to adopt a serious tone - the seriousness, he thinks, is so deep in the core of everything he does that he can afford to chuck in a bit of arsing about on top. Second, his favourite theme is the way in which the earthy, sexy side of human natures collides with the civilised, intellectual (and, naturally, artificial) bits. This means that his films are full of lurid juxtapositions of high art and low comedy, the rarefied and the downright dirty; and this kind of juxtaposition is a common technique of parody.

At some point, though, in the last 10, 20, or 30 years - take your pick - he seems to have stopped simply doing what he does, and to have begun aping what he does. As I say, pointing to the exact moment when this started isn't easy; but it's clear, from listening to The Death of Alexander Scriabin (Radio 3, Sunday), his first radio play, that the process has been going on long enough to become firmly entrenched.

If there was a fault with this play, considered as parody, it was that it was too mercilessly accurate. One by one, Russell's foibles were caught, gassed and pinned into place: you want music 'n' sex? You can have Scriabin, a man whose most famous work (the "Poem of Ecstasy") is a lengthy orchestral depiction of orgasm (surprising Russell hasn't got round to him already, come to think of it). You want orthodox religion defied? Over-the-top acting by Oliver Reed? Bizarre fantasy sequences? All right, he can play the celebrated devil-worshipper Aleister Crowley, and he and Scriabin can have a black mass in a cathedral and then go off on safari with their mistresses, only to narrowly escape being eaten by Cambridge-educated cannibals, and then it can all turn out to be the product of Scriabin's terminal delirium. And Bob's your uncle.

Of course, nobody else would have dared to stick so close to the traditional Russell formulae. And nobody else would have dared to make the jokes so cheap: " 'Oldin that big cock all night ain't my idea of fun," complains Crowley's mistress - and it turns out she's talking about an actual cock, being used in a sacrifice. How we roared.

In the end, this felt rather less like a radio play and more like a 50- minute commentary on something Russell considers far more important, his own films: all in all, flatulent, self-indulgent and artistically redundant.

Did I say that I loved it?

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sandyboy
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21/03/2011 11:53 pm  

I actually heard this when it was first broadcast and it was as mad as it sounds, if not quite as riotously entertaining as these reviews would suggest. Ken is a national treasure - when he's gone they'll all be lining up to reassess him and swear they knew he was a genius all along - the hypocritical schweinhundts!


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lashtal
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22/03/2011 12:33 am  

Hear hear!

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fanadil
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22/03/2011 2:02 am  

sandybot - I believe there was a version of "Fall of the House of Ushe"r filmed at Netherwood a couple of years after Crowley's death, and that one of his paintings is visible in the background


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spike418
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22/03/2011 6:33 am  
"sandyboy" wrote:
I actually heard this when it was first broadcast and it was as mad as it sounds, if not quite as riotously entertaining as these reviews would suggest. Ken is a national treasure - when he's gone they'll all be lining up to reassess him and swear they knew he was a genius all along - the hypocritical schweinhundts!

As a fan of both his early and later work I could not agree more. IMHO The Devils is one of the greatest films ever made.


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lashtal
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28/04/2011 11:01 pm  

Another mention of the new Crowley movie here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/apr/28/ken-russell-the-devils

Sorry to hear that Mr Russell has been unwell…

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Walterfive
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29/04/2011 2:25 pm  
"fanadil" wrote:
sandybot - I believe there was a version of "Fall of the House of Ushe"r filmed at Netherwood a couple of years after Crowley's death, and that one of his paintings is visible in the background

That was released straight to video seven or eight years ago as "The Fall Of The Louse of Usher: A 21st Century Gothic Fable" and it was most bizzare, shot on camcorder in director Ken Russell's garage/studio, with a cast made up of friends and neighbors. It's a home-made movie but it's got Ken Russel's genius. Ken *is* looking remarkably like Crowley these days.


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christibrany
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29/04/2011 4:56 pm  

Do we have any news on a title or a release date? Or is his health making it an unlikely thing do you think?


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