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Exhibition: Egyptian Book of the Dead at the British Museum


James
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Follow the ancient Egyptians’ journey from death to the afterlife in this major exhibition focusing on the Book of the Dead. The ‘Book’ was not a single text but a compilation of spells designed to guide the deceased through the dangers of the underworld and ensure eternal life. Many of these beautifully illustrated works on papyrus and linen have never been seen before, and the oldest examples are over 3,500 years old. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see these fascinating and fragile objects alongside superbly crafted funerary figurines, amulets, jewellery, statues and coffins. Journey with the Book of the Dead to discover the important mythical and spiritual ideas of ancient Egyptian life and death.

British Museum – Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead exhibition

4th November 2010 – 6th March 2011


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lashtal
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Just a note that this fabulous exhibition is more than half-way through its run. It really is well worth a couple of hours of your time if you're in London, especially now that the lengthy queues have gone.

Not least, it's an opportunity to see the coffin of Besenmut, father of Ankhefenkhons I, it would appear.

The catalogue - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Journey-Through-Afterlife-Ancient-Egyptian/dp/0714119938/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1296169921&sr=8-1 - a mightily impressive volume, features all the exhibits in high quality illustrations, including said coffin.

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Michael Staley
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I went to see this exhibition in November, and it was extremely good. There is a lot of material, and many of the panels and friezes look amazingly fresh and vivid. Highly recommended.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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 Anonymous
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Is Besenmut's coffin really there? How exciting!


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lashtal
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Yes, it is there and it's displayed beautifully. I have my suspicions as to which Besenmut it relates to, though: it seems probable that he's actually the grandson of 'our' Ankhefenkhons.

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 Anonymous
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I think the Besenmuts are actually a bit confusing. I have read suggestions that there were 2 Ankhefenkhons whose wives "surprisingly had the same name", but I think that Ankhefenhkons I was probably married to his cousin, and that's why when traced through paternal relatives it sounds like there were 2 of them. From my notes... Egyptological Aspects - Beta. Crowley/H. Beta (745) N.257. Ankhefenkhons I was a Theban priest of Mentu (or Month), the Egyptian God of war, and flourished during the transition from the Third Intermediate Period to the Late Period, a time of great upheaval in Egypt. He was born into a prominent family of Theban officials, the son of Besenmut I and Taneshet. His grandfather Wennofer/Iryiry I was 3rd prophet of Amun. He married Neskhons I, the daughter of Hoormat, the Chief Treasurer of Pharaoh [Bakenrenef (727-715 BCE) or Piankhy 747-716 BCE)?], and had three children. His name was not unique, which has resulted in occasional misattribution of artifacts in various museums to the Ankhefenkhons I connected to the Cairo Working by students of Crowley’s work. He has a grandson named Ankhefenkhons II, and his wife’s cousin also appears in Egyptian genealogies as Ankhefenkhons I [might this not be because she married her cousin who _was_ Ankhefenkhons I?]; to confuse matters further, this cousin’s mother was also named Besenmut [see!].


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 Anonymous
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>>this cousin’s mother was also named Besenmut<< Mother? Did I write that note down properly? Anyway, don't have time to follow it up now.


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 Anonymous
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"lashtal" wrote:
Just a note that this fabulous exhibition is more than half-way through its run. It really is well worth a couple of hours of your time if you're in London, especially now that the lengthy queues have gone.

Not least, it's an opportunity to see the coffin of Besenmut, father of Ankhefenkhons I, it would appear.

The catalogue - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Journey-Through-Afterlife-Ancient-Egyptian/dp/0714119938/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1296169921&sr=8-1 - a mightily impressive volume, features all the exhibits in high quality illustrations, including said coffin.

Do you know how long the run will last? We'll be in London in mid-late April.


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 Anonymous
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The exhibition is displayed within a route of tall black partitions. It is an almost surreal experience, I found -- one almost effects a perichoresis of time and space as it were -- to occasionally glance up at the huge 1857 domed ceiling of the BM reading room, under which the magical artifacts of this exhibition have been temporarily gathered from the different world in which they originated.


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the_real_simon_iff
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"azael93" wrote:
Do you know how long the run will last? We'll be in London in mid-late April.
"James" wrote:
4th November 2010 – 6th March 2011

Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
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"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
"azael93" wrote:
Do you know how long the run will last? We'll be in London in mid-late April.
"James" wrote:
4th November 2010 – 6th March 2011

Love=Law
Lutz

Oh, yeah. Thanks. 😳


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