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Wanted: Sword of Song - Kamuret Press

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Mazus
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Hi everyone

I am hoping to secure a copy of this book edited by Richard Kaczynski for a reasonable price.  I am interested in the standard copy only not the deluxe.

A big thanks if anyone can help me here.


   
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chuck
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Where (generally) are you located?

How do you define 'reasonable'? (generally)

Gates Past Books has one at 425US$ plus 11 shipping and Desert Owl also on eBay has one at 350US$...

 

 


   
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Mazus
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@chuck Thanks for the reply.  Yes, 'reasonable' is what one subjectively thinks and how much one wants something!

For me I'd be prepared to pay $250-$300US for this.  I'm in Australia where I note that postage can be a lottery and a source of bumping up the price.  I get books from the US sent for as little as $16.95US to as much as $70US.  I'm not familiar with Gates books and Desert Owl only has the deluxe for sale which probably makes the $350US they were asking about the price for this one.

I'm keen to get the book but the total price with post is crucial.  For example there is another one that is 299 pounds which equates to the $350US but they want 50 pounds to post so it becomes a juggling exercise.  I'll just wait and one will come along eventually.  It always does if you're patient enough 🙂


   
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chuck
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Gates Past Book is in New York City, USA and have been for a while.

Desert Owl (ebay seller in New Mexico, USA) has both the leather bound - 930US$

and the standard - 350US$

You should ask them about shipping...

 

Good luck.


   
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Mazus
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@chuck Thanks again. I'm not seeing the std with Desert Owl.  Not that it matters but I get the deluxe :  https://www.ebay.com/itm/354092795774   and then if I link to other items there are no other items.  Likewise following to their store shows nothing which I suspect is based on my location as they don't ship to Australia.  The vagaries of ebay!


   
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toadstoolwe
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@chuck I am a bibliophile myself.  I looked up the ebay ad, and I guess if you REALLY have to have this book, you can make monthly payments through PayPal credit.  $930.00 is a pretty steep price, BUT I bet you could resell for a profit to some Crowley fanatics out there with lots of money to spend.  (Like Jimmy Page for instance).


   
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Shiva
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Posted by: @mazus

I'll just wait and one will come along eventually.

Passive Acceptance is good, and only subject to the greater Law of doing the Will.

Posted by: @toadstoolwe

you can make monthly payments through PayPal credit. 

1. I, yur God, am a jealous guy and I don't want no politics discussed because I make the rules.

2. Introduction of PayPal as a deity and the offering of usury-credit-debt systems is punishable by death [period]

3. Get this: The unmentionable entities and systems mentioned above are the Tip of the Borg. Beware!

There are 7 Recommandments to go - please take a seat in the Waiting Room


   
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toadstoolwe
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@shiva I don't use PayPal myself, but I thought if the guy wanted the book so badly, and $930.00 is pretty steep, he could buy it with payment arrangements.  But, yeah, it would be better just to pay the asking price and be done with it.  If there is a cheaper copy available, go for it.  The most I ever paid for an out-of-print book was $250.00.  It's still sitting on my shelf.


   
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the_real_simon_iff
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@mazus Hi Mazus, I am willing to sell mine (mint, unread, upper right corner slightly bumped from shipping to me) including shipping to Australia for 300 US dollars. This would include trackable shipping, but only insured up to 50 Euros. Insurance for 500 Euros would be 30 dollars more. Also, shipping to Australia can take up to 40 days, says DHL. If you are interested or need pics or anything, drop me a line to lutz(at)lutzlemke.de


   
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Michael Staley
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Posted by: @mazus

am hoping to secure a copy of this book edited by Richard Kaczynski for a reasonable price. 

This book had a print run of 350 copies, of which 31 were deluxes, thus leaving a standard edition of 319. It's a very scarce book therefore, and I think that second-hand copies will come up rarely and the price will be expensive. I doubt that there will be a more reasonable price than that offered by Lutz.

This is a well-produced, beautiful book on good paper with generous margins. I'd imagine that Richard Kaczynski was working on it for a long time. I've not seen a first edition of The Sword of Song, but I imagine that the lovely typography of this edition was inspired by that of the first.

 

 


   
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Mazus
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Thanks for the offer. Email sent to you Lutz


   
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the_real_simon_iff
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@mazus So far no email has arrived. Just so you know.


   
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Mazus
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@the_real_simon_iff 

Weird.  Let me have another go when I get home this  afternoon


   
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the_real_simon_iff
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Sorted out. I was too stupid to see the mail as I expected it today and it came yesterday.


   
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hadgigegenraum
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"PEACE TO ALL BEINGS"

Is found in Sword of Song, at the end of the introduction to the poems; Ascension Day and Pentecost...Seeing that benediction, and at the time of publication, 1904, and in capital letters, had a very modern feel to it, of the sixties...i came across this while opening up the Collected Works, where a  Sword of Song is found in Vol. II.

I am glad that the original book was republished, though it would be nice if runs could possibly be a bit larger...


   
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toadstoolwe
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@hadgigegenraum That is what I have always loved about Aleister Crowley's original publications.  Cutting-edge book cover design, and typography that is almost an art in itself.  That is why I find late editions of his work so disappointing.  The content is accurate, but no care has been taken in reprinting facsimile editions (Except in special, limited editions.)  Sangreal Foundation out of Dallas, Tx does a good job in publishing Crowley's work, as does Weiser Publications.  I realize you get what you pay for, a cheap edition while useable and great to own, just doesn't have the same emotional attachment as a early edition.  I once owned a first edition of The Equinox of the Gods, 1936.  I eventually sold it another collector.   Being the micro-manger he was, he may have even my copy of the book looking for errors in printing.  SO, MOTE IT BE!


   
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Shiva
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Posted by: @hadgigegenraum

it would be nice if runs could possibly be a bit larger...

Yeah. The longer the run, the cheaper each book becomes (at production level). There is a balancing point between the contents of one's purse and the volume of tomes to be flooded out upon the marketplace.

However, when we get down to 3 copies, or 7, or even 23, we must start looking up words like artisan, craftsman, egocentrist, bibliogenitorofile, and other such oddities of description.


   
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the_real_simon_iff
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

no care has been taken in reprinting facsimile editions (Except in special, limited editions.)

I agree. And one would think it is the easiest way to produce a book. I love what First Impressions did in the 90ies. When I lived in London then I managed to get nearly all of them at totally standard book prices (today these all have risen immensily in price). What was also nice that these were all in the original sizes of AC's books, which varied heavily. Also Gordon Press did many facsimile editions, but sadly only from books in The Collected Works, which of course did not have the typesetting design of the original books (or more specific, the Collected Works had a terrible typesetting design to fit 40 books or so into 3).


   
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toadstoolwe
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@the_real_simon_iff I hear you!  The first edition of Magick in Theory & Practice is a small volume with no translations of the Greek quotations, and of course it does not contain the long introduction and footnotes of the Symonds and Grant edition by Samuel Weiser.  The Weiser edition is not a bad edition, just very different from the original in size typography, and the illustrations are limited  to black and white small photographic plates of Crowley demonstrating the opening and closing of the temple.


   
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Michael Staley
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Posted by: @hadgigegenraum

I am glad that the original book was republished, though it would be nice if runs could possibly be a bit larger...

Yes, it would be nice if runs could be larger. The publisher of Kamuret Press is a friend of mine, and was simply not in a position to produce a larger run at the time. Have you tried occult publishing? Just a thought...


   
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Michael Staley
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

I once owned a first edition of The Equinox of the Gods, 1936.

This is a lovely book in so many ways –  the rich paper, the generous margins, the lovely white buckram binding of the boards with the gold stamping.


   
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toadstoolwe
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@michael-staley Yes, and the cherry on the top is a full color reproduction of the Stele of Revealing.  Later editions did not have them, or were in B/W.


   
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Shiva
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

a full color reproduction of the Stele of Revealing

Right. The Equinox of the Gods was intended to fulfill certain instructions ("all this and a book to tell your story")[sic]  -  So this is it. The "official" story with diary/record quotes (proof). A Pillar of Orientation to and into The Mystery of The Cairo Reception - It's like the obelisk at On ...

image

Good grief and the harmonious rectification!  This book even came with a facsimile copy (of the original) ... as instructed.

The red and black letters is just a calligraphic trick invented (or stolen) by Roman monk scribes, so let's give AC a break on the red ink.

Actually, there is nothing to forgive - red ink is used sparingly on a few pages, such as ...

image

So all is in divine order. The instructions were fulfilled.

In a certain way,
one could say:
"This is the central doc
so go set your clock

'cause it's all downhill from here

 


   
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toadstoolwe
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@shiva Affirmative Master!  I believe red ink is called a rubric, a device to draw the attention of the reader to an essential or cardinal point, or message in a passage.  I think the subject has been brought up before in a discussion of Ancient Egyptian texts written on papyri.  They may have invented the rubric.  Mr. Crowley used rubrics to add a liturgical atmosphere and of course, demand the reader to pay attention.  (Like typographical daggers and Maltese crosses in footnotes.)


   
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Shiva
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

Mr. Crowley used rubrics to add a liturgical atmosphere and of course, demand the reader to pay attention.

He didn't use them very often, but then 2-color printing ups the production cost quite a bit - two print runs (back in those days). Yet I was pleased to see that he rubricked the Eq Gods.

I wonder where he got involved with rubrickism? The Plymouth Brothers? Other Bible-Books he saw? In any case, his overall style is that of strict Christianity, with Sacred Books, Saints, a Mass, rubrics, familiar second-person Biblio-speak lingo.

Sure, they're all different than the Roman or Protester versions (Good grief, there's a woman priestess woven throughout this paradigm), but I guess there's some archetype that gives rise to all versions of crowd control.

 


   
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toadstoolwe
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@shiva All very good observations!  I think there is an optical factor as well.  Stark black followed by bright red is visually stimulating.  Someone learned that thousands of years ago, either consciously or unconsciously.  That is why the history of books and writing is so fascinating.


   
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hadgigegenraum
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@michael-staley 

I am sure the margins are quite close in all sorts of publishing endeavors and certainly appreciative especially of small presses that preserve certain bookmaking traditions, but no i have not tried occult publishing....

Frankly I take the "war engine" to mean the printing press, why even Liber Legis demands to be published, and the "rich man from the west" was supposed to fund the publishing efforts.

The question publishing,  though does take me back to thinking about Art Rosenbaum's printing press in the dining room of his house on Morton St. in Germantown in Philadelphia two doors down from Sun Ra's house...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdTR-fiLfwQ

Art was an inventive strange character whom Colin Wilson did write an extensive introduction Art's book Unpopular Science, and I am sorry that I never around while he published his Aquarian Research Foundation newsletter, or Natural Birth Control book that included astrological methods, all printed on very granola-ish brown ink. The background was pure 60's save the planet, where Art and Judy and children all  advocated small intentional communities, to which Sun Ra's house was an example of communal existence servicing artistic spiritual quests...So Art was a pamphleteer of a quirky evangelism that included polyamory...

So if I think of occult publishing, i do think as I did recently, concerning the II. 76 thread concerning 395, solved as (La)!,

https://www.lashtal.com/forums/thelema-2/acs-writings-on-botl-supports-395-as-ii76-ciphers-total-value/paged/2/#post-124072

that I was prompted to open my copy of the Equinox of the Gods to look at the reference to 395. I do not have the white buckram, but the proletariate edition in a burgundy cloth, which has wear, but the quality of such a book, from 1936, the layout, typeface, substantial paper, and size, is a treat that it is nice to work with over the years, with the though that it would be nice if this could be done the same way...

Yes to think of publishing I do think of book making from the point of the power of the press, having one oneself, but alas I did not take time to watch Art and learn, instead I worked in amongst the characters of the used book trade, which included a notorious fellow in the trade whom had started Skoobs and was back in a Philadelphia after some sort of chaos...but made the connections that kept me employed but in another world at the same time...

So runs of books, well it was at one time when Grant's books were traded around by those who were lucky enough to have a copy... Well thank the stars that Symonds and Grant had the Confessions printed in a mass paperback, well done with great cover, and I have one that still holds up, but now expensive, and can even a good paperback be made of the same...for the humor and stories of those pages, and the language itself!

And thank some strange stars that I my introduction to Grant's work was by the fact that the main branch of the Philadelphia Free Library, near the Rodin Museum had up on a mezzanine copies of Cults of the Shadow and Outside the Circles of Time, to which i came repeatedly, up a circular stair in a room of strange enormity, to peer into a world that had a fascination way beyond my comprehension...


   
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