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Aleister's Granddaughter  

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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
16/09/2013 5:08 pm  

Hello there
I'd really appreciate a little feedback on something from the true Crowley followers on this superb site. I'm writing a series of occult novels - three so far - with the great man's granddaughter as the central character. The first story covers Aleister's demise and provides a whole new (and totally fictitious, of course) interpretation. As a major plot device, I've also used the gold watch that was stolen from his room shortly after his death. This scene occurs as a prologue at the beginning and you can dip into it for free on the link below. If the link doesn't work for any reason, the novel is Sisterhood by Ian Jarvis on Amazon.
Very best wishes
Ian Jarvis

http://www.amazon.co.uk/SISTERHOOD-ebook/dp/B00C09WWNC/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1379347500&sr=8-2&keywords=ian+jarvis


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Hamal
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16/09/2013 5:51 pm  

Welcome Ian!

93
Hamal


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lashtal
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16/09/2013 6:38 pm  

Welcome to LAShTAL, Ian.

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LAShTAL


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michaelclarke18
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16/09/2013 9:47 pm  

Welcome!

Your book has had some great reviews - congrats!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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16/09/2013 10:47 pm  

Thank you very much for the warm welcome messages


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 Anonymous
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17/09/2013 2:33 am  

Welcome!


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jamie barter
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17/09/2013 10:55 am  

(“We accept you, we accept you, one of us, one of us!”)

Welcome Ian.  (You are well come.)  There is nothing quite like a good writer: the best of luck with your literary efforts,

Norma N. Joy Conquest


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
17/09/2013 4:21 pm  

Again, thank you. Jamie says there's nothing quite like a good writer and I'm reminded of the old joke. There's nothing like a good writer and, yes, you're NOTHING like a good writer.


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jamie barter
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18/09/2013 2:56 pm  
"Ian Jarvis" wrote:
Again, thank you. Jamie says there's nothing quite like a good writer and I'm reminded of the old joke. There's nothing like a good writer and, yes, you're NOTHING like a good writer.

You are right, Ian, it could be taken more than one way.  Such is sometimes the art of the craft of writing.  Though you being a ‘newie’, I was just joking & wouldn't dream to comment too astringently on your own.  However as you asked people to take a bite:

“Sisterhood” sounds a bit of a vague, wishy-washy title: wouldn’t “The Carpet Killer”  have had a bit more pizzazz to it under the circumstances?

Is there more portrait of “A.C.” in it, or has he now shuffled off his mortal coil?  Being strangled/ asphyxiated with his bedding – now there’s a novel (in both senses of the word) twist on “thy death shall be lovely”…

As Hamal suggested in the other similar thread, your first sentence did not strike me as the most alluring to continue, but first sentences are always difficult and I have seen a lot far worse.  It reminds me a bit of the first sentence to the first book I wrote – which started something like “Rain fell against the windowpane.”  (I was very young at the time...)  I remember a literary critic – a publisher’s reader, no less – suggested to me: “Put down drumming.  The rain drummed against the windowpane.”  (It languishes in a drawer.)

“Seventy-two years hadn’t diminished the divine effects of his favourite drug.”  This is of course his age and not the number of years he had been on the merry H, though.  I am not sure of the year he originally used it, but he was first well hooked by 1922; I think it had been originally advertised as a cough suppressant or asthma remedy, and was manufactured for sale over the counter in chemist shops by Bayer (later a subsidiary of the giant cartel I.G. Farben, who of course went on to manufacture the labour-saving ‘machinery’ - ovens and so forth - used in concentration camps.)

As A.C. died on December 1st, Christmas would have been nearer four weeks away than three.

Was Kathleen the owner rather than housekeeper at Netherwood?  I thought a gentleman was responsible – what the hell was his name, now?  Gerald Suster in his Legacy of The Beast referred to him as “W.H.”, but I’m sure I remember seeing a Vernon something somewhere… There’s a whole book on the boarding-house just come out too (looks pretty good, from what I can see, though I don’t have thirty-five quid for it at the moment) which would probably hold the answers; meanwhile I’m sure some other Lashtalian will oblige if necessary & they can be bothered to do so.

Beachyhead is two words, i.e., Beachy Head.

I was agreeably surprised to see that the location switched rapidly from Hastings to the scene of my old alma mater, that windy city "The Athens of the North”.  There, bits had me in mind of that entertaining tv programme Most Haunted, before fading into dissolve of one of identikit serial killer thrillers, with shades of “Shallow Grave” too…

Whilst not Dostoyevsky, I am sure the book would make a perfectly respectable “poolside read”, if you know what I mean, amiable nonsense as it is (no offence).  It reminds me in that respect of David St. Clair’s Bloodline, which you may have seen featured in the thread of the same name which I submitted on the “Recommendations” board…

With best wishes for your future fecundity,
N. Joy.


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William Thirteen
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18/09/2013 4:08 pm  

I.G. Farben did not manufacture "ovens and so forth" used in the extermination camps. They did hold the patent to Zyklon B, the pesticide used for 'delousing' in the camps, however, as well as own a significant share of the company which manufactured it.


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lashtal
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18/09/2013 7:51 pm  
"jamie barter" wrote:
Was Kathleen the owner rather than housekeeper at Netherwood?  I thought a gentleman was responsible – what the hell was his name, now?  Gerald Suster in his Legacy of The Beast referred to him as “W.H.”, but I’m sure I remember seeing a Vernon something somewhere… There’s a whole book on the boarding-house just come out too (looks pretty good, from what I can see, though I don’t have thirty-five quid for it at the moment) which would probably hold the answers; meanwhile I’m sure some other Lashtalian will oblige if necessary & they can be bothered to do so.

If memory serves, Kathleen Symonds (known as 'Johnny') owned and ran the guest house with her husband, Vernon. The book referred to (by Antony Clayton) is a delightful account and is well worth the investment.

http://www.lashtal.com/portal/news/aleister-crowley/2676-netherwood-last-resort-of-aleister-crowley.html

Owner and Editor
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jamie barter
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19/09/2013 12:17 pm  
"WilliamThirteen" wrote:
I.G. Farben did not manufacture "ovens and so forth" used in the extermination camps. They did hold the patent to Zyklon B, the pesticide used for 'delousing' in the camps, however, as well as own a significant share of the company which manufactured it.

Well that’s all right, then!  Well done, WilliamThirteen, you have proved yourself on the ball: the ovens were actually made by the firm of Topf & Söhne (not Mercedes [Daimler-Benz], as is also sometimes alleged).  In those immortal words “I am glad someone spotted my deliberate error there!” The intention was not to muddle up my atrocities: you’re quite right, Farben were responsible for Zyklon B, and also had fingers in a lot of other murky pies too, such as chlorine gas in WW1, Dolophine (their trade name for methadone, so named in honour after Adolf Hitler, thereby securing their unusual monopoly of being responsible for both the principal agent causing addiction and its so-called “cure”) in addition to the nerve gases tabun and sarin (still in use today & allegedly linked with Gulf War Syndrome).

“Always glad to serve you” (Pass the Lifebuoy),
N. Joy

"lashtal" wrote:
"jamie barter" wrote:
Was Kathleen the owner rather than housekeeper at Netherwood?  I thought a gentleman was responsible – what the hell was his name, now?  Gerald Suster in his Legacy of The Beast referred to him as “W.H.”, but I’m sure I remember seeing a Vernon something somewhere… There’s a whole book on the boarding-house just come out too (looks pretty good, from what I can see, though I don’t have thirty-five quid for it at the moment) which would probably hold the answers; meanwhile I’m sure some other Lashtalian will oblige if necessary & they can be bothered to do so.

If memory serves, Kathleen Symonds (known as 'Johnny') owned and ran the guest house with her husband, Vernon. The book referred to (by Antony Clayton) is a delightful account and is well worth the investment.

Thanks for the clarification there Paul.  It does look a splendidly put together compendium which I would love to obtain before it goes out of print.

Incidentally, Ian, I quite liked the little touch of the inclusion of atmospheric mood music drifting over the ether from a ‘wireless’ appliance in another tenant’s room at Netherwood.  That sort of thing – although not necessarily Moonlight Serenade, which was more wartime; either Blow The Wind Southerly or Brazil of around that time might have fitted better – similar to Elizabethan Serenade, Some Enchanted Evening, Mantovani product, etc., just afterwards, rather sums up the sense of the post-war soon-to-be-enveloping conservative world of especially 1950s Britain (and to a lesser degree the United States), prior to its rescue here by rock’n’roll, Angry Young Men, the teddy culture, etc.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
20/09/2013 4:47 pm  

Hello again and thanks for all the comments, especially Jamie. Yes, no offence taken over the 'poolside read' description - at the end of the day, it's meant to be a mystery thriller. You're right too about Kathleen. She and her husband Vernon were the joint owners of Netherwood and he was something of an eccentric character, which all added to the arty and unconventional atmosphere in the hotel. Aleister doesn't appear in the flesh any more in Sisterhood, but plenty of later conversation concerns him and I've suggested an explanation for the mysterious German woman who showed up at his funeral. He appears in the following two novels in flashback and on old cine film. Again, thanks for taking the time to read the prologue.


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jamie barter
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23/09/2013 4:18 pm  

You’re quite welcome Ian.  I too am glad you took my criticism in the (kind hearted though direct) spirit it was meant. 

Incidentally, this “mysterious German woman” who turns up at A.C.’s funeral: does this character have any basis in reality, or were you inventing her for the purposes of your book?  Can your readers safely presume she is one and the same damsel who suffocated A.C. to death with his own pillow?  (Oh, the ignominy of it!  I do trust she brought flowers?!)

I wasn’t aware of any “mystery mourners” at the funeral as such & think the only ‘strangers’ not known to the others were the (four?) representatives of the British press, but may be wrong.  I would have thought there must be a full list of mourners available somewhere, possibly on this very website – any reference, anybody??  It would also be very interesting (and possibly entertaining) to read the minutes of the Brighton Council meeting convened to discuss the bad publicity – I’d have also thought there might be a microfiche or something available – which ensued as a result of the unorthodox cremation ceremony.

Dust to dusty,
N. Joy


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
24/09/2013 5:54 pm  

This is really going to sound as if I invented this woman, but I know I've read somewhere about a German woman in black who turned up in the crematorium. It was probably in the John Symonds autobiography, but I'll hunt through my various books and check. I seem to think she was mentioned in relation to his endless list of lovers, as in 'and even after death, he had a mysterious German beauty turn up at the rear of the room.'


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
24/09/2013 6:19 pm  

Hi again Jamie. I just found this, which makes a brief reference to it

http://www.21stcenturyradio.com/articles/03/1001231.html

I'll keep digging to find the right book


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jamie barter
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25/09/2013 12:04 pm  

That is very interesting, Ian - Thanks.  Yes, a “German lady” does appear to have placed a wreath, or at least roses, upon A.C.'s coffin – how ‘mysterious’ she is, is not detailed however: that seems to be your embellishment based upon the basic fact that you do not know her name?  I suppose what we really need is a full list of mourners.  A.C. did know German womenfolk, but unless they were the partners of Messrs Germer or Mellinger I cannot imagine who she might have been.

Also mentioned, I have often wondered whether A.C. chugged off to the cinema to see The Wizard of Oz, and find Mrs Symonds comment about it only being “a children’s film” wouldn’t necessarily have put him off or not if he'd wanted to go.  There may even have been the sign of an old odeon ticket stub in his ‘rather wide knickerbockers’.

Merci beaucipuo encore!
N.Joy


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