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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
08/04/2012 5:43 am  

Have there been any discussions about Kenneth Grant's novels being based on real events from the New Isis Lodge era?  I know most were written either during or after this period and he was likely drawing from a lot of ideas and experiences.  But I'm curious if that was the intention or if they are 'just' novels, not meant to be looked at too deeply.

What about any of them written as gateways to certain avenues of gnosis in the guise of fiction?  Do any of his novels specifically tie in to the Trilogies?  (for example, "Novel X has more wink-wink insights on this mind-bender I just dropped in your lap")  I know that Against the Light ties in with The Ninth Arch, but as I don't have the latter I'm not in a position to judge how or what.

I've become fascinated with this side of Grant's work and I'm in the process of buying the rest of his novels (I have Against the Light).  Hidden connections or not, they all sound really interesting.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
08/04/2012 7:27 am  

Funny you bring this up right now, as I'm expecting a package from JD Holmes this week consisting of Grant's novels, sans Against the Light. I'll try to post something more relevant within the week. 'Til then, why not check out this review of Against the Light by Alan Moore (if you haven't already): http://www.fulgur.co.uk/authors/grant/articles/beyond-our-ken/

Oh, you might also want to try the product descriptions @ Starfire's site.

Have you checked out Convolvulus? I love his poems, then again several of my friends have confirmed that I have bad taste in poetry!

5oh9.


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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08/04/2012 7:36 am  

You will note characters that pop up in the fictions with real-life correspondences. A couple folks  from "Hecate's Fountain", for example. In terms of inserting the fiction into the trilogies, only "Against the Light" has an acknowledged  place  in the progression of the trilogies - thematically it falls between Beyond the Mauve Zone and Ninth Arch and is intended to support the concepts set forth in the latter volume.


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Michael Staley
(@michael-staley)
MANIO - it's all in the egg
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3970
08/04/2012 2:56 pm  

I don't think that the novels were based on events occurring in New Isis Lodge. Undoubtedly there are influences, in the sense that any author or artist draws upon his or her experience to a lesser or greater extent. The jacket blurb for Snakewand and the Darker Strain by Grant gives an insight to the characterisation:

These stories, and other tales in this series, were written in the wake of rituals performed over a period of seven years in New Isis Lodge. Many were the magicians and mediums who passed through the Lodge, and some of them feature in the series of novellas. Their mundane personalities may not have appeared unusual to casual observation, but when elongated and siderealised by the unique perspectives which their magical rôles created for them, they achieved an apotheosis, an epiphany. This extraordinary phenomenon demonstrated the heights and the depths which human nature is capable of scaling and of fathoming, in the delirious frenzy inspired by their art. These tales are likewise orientated to the other side of a reality rarely glimpsed outside a magically charged Circle.

Judging from the typescripts of these stories which Kenneth passed to me for preparation for publication, it's my opinion that they were written in the late 1950s and the 1960s. The exceptions of course are Against the Light which was written in the mid-1990s, and the recently-published Grist to Whose Mill? which was written in the early 1950s.

I don't think that there are any connections with the Typhonian Trilogies, which he started writing later.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
08/04/2012 9:47 pm  
"509" wrote:
Have you checked out Convolvulus? I love his poems, then again several of my friends have confirmed that I have bad taste in poetry!

5oh9.

I've read some excerpts and I thought they were very good.  I'm not an expert on poetry but I do enjoy it.  I plan on getting a copy of Convolvulus when I pick up the rest of the books.  I might have to do a 5-in-1 bundle order once Mr Holmes gets Grist to Whose Mill in stock. 😉

"einDoppelganger" wrote:
You will note characters that pop up in the fictions with real-life correspondences. A couple folks  from "Hecate's Fountain", for example. In terms of inserting the fiction into the trilogies, only "Against the Light" has an acknowledged  place  in the progression of the trilogies - thematically it falls between Beyond the Mauve Zone and Ninth Arch and is intended to support the concepts set forth in the latter volume.

I have Hecate's Fountain but haven't gotten to it yet (I've been reading them in order).  I'll keep my eyes peeled for this when I become more familiar with the novels. 🙂

"MichaelStaley" wrote:
I don't think that the novels were based on events occurring in New Isis Lodge. Undoubtedly there are influences, in the sense that any author or artist draws upon his or her experience to a lesser or greater extent. The jacket blurb for Snakewand and the Darker Strain by Grant gives an insight to the characterisation:

These stories, and other tales in this series, were written in the wake of rituals performed over a period of seven years in New Isis Lodge. Many were the magicians and mediums who passed through the Lodge, and some of them feature in the series of novellas. Their mundane personalities may not have appeared unusual to casual observation, but when elongated and siderealised by the unique perspectives which their magical rôles created for them, they achieved an apotheosis, an epiphany. This extraordinary phenomenon demonstrated the heights and the depths which human nature is capable of scaling and of fathoming, in the delirious frenzy inspired by their art. These tales are likewise orientated to the other side of a reality rarely glimpsed outside a magically charged Circle.

Judging from the typescripts of these stories which Kenneth passed to me for preparation for publication, it's my opinion that they were written in the late 1950s and the 1960s. The exceptions of course are Against the Light which was written in the mid-1990s, and the recently-published Grist to Whose Mill? which was written in the early 1950s.

I don't think that there are any connections with the Typhonian Trilogies, which he started writing later.

Thanks for the reply Michael, its interesting as always.  I was just curious about any specific connections... one never knows with a writer like Grant.  In any case, they all sound interesting I look forward to reading the rest of them soon.


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Michael Staley
(@michael-staley)
MANIO - it's all in the egg
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3970
09/04/2012 12:26 am  

I hope you enjoy them. Grant's fiction is very under-rated in my opinion.


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einDoppelganger
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09/04/2012 8:35 am  

Against the Light, being written in the 90s is intended to cast further light on "The Ninth Arch" though, isn't it? More specifically the reception of OKBISh.

I was under the impression it was written as such.

einD


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Michael Staley
(@michael-staley)
MANIO - it's all in the egg
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3970
11/04/2012 1:05 am  
"einDoppelganger" wrote:
Against the Light, being written in the 90s is intended to cast further light on "The Ninth Arch" though, isn't it? More specifically the reception of OKBISh.

Yes, that's correct. The intention was to take some of the elements of OKBISh and cast them in a fictional form, so as to make OKBISh more accessible. Although The Ninth Arch incorporated the first publication of OKBISh, it's an extended commentary on the latter, and thus distinct from Against the Light.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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