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 Anonymous
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I am ignorant in what .·. means especially in Magickal Names. I don't want to go ahead and use it in my Magickal name (Frater K.H.A.) while being ignorant to its meaning can anyone clarify on this?


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Azidonis
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93,

I always thought it to be somewhat "reserved", denoting the Triangle or City of the Pyramids. Could be wrong tho...

93 93/93


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jdes
 jdes
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There are a few short paragraphs on pp34/35 of 'Progradior and the Beast' in which author Keith Richmonds explains The Pyramid of Dots or Fire Dots as originating in 18th C. European freemasonry. He also recalls that Grant mentions them in his 'The Magical Revival'. Perhaps someone else can confirm this as I don't have a copy to refer to.


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jdes
 jdes
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It has just occurred to me... a lot of folk will have encountered .'. in maths lessons. It stands for 'therefore' but how many realise its twin '.' (an upside down version) stands for 'Because'. Hmm, where have I come across that word before?

See http://www.scenta.co.uk/tcaep/maths/symbol/Mathematical%20Symbols/index.htm


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 Anonymous
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"jdes" wrote:
It has just occurred to me... a lot of folk will have encountered .'. in maths lessons. It stands for 'therefore' but how many realise its twin '.' (an upside down version) stands for 'Because'. Hmm, where have I come across that word before?

See http://www.scenta.co.uk/tcaep/maths/symbol/Mathematical%20Symbols/index.htm

Hmm. Then again, isn't "because" the same as "therefore", except the direction of implication is reverse? I mean, aren't these two statements equivalent:

"x=y and y=z, therefore x=z"
"x=z, because x=y and y=z"

In this scheme, hexagram would perhaps mean something close to "if and only if". 😮


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Anonymous
 Anonymous
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I had always taken the three dots to be masonic in nature indicating that the lodge (or even person) in question possess the proper masonic investitures.

Kenneth Grant does mention the dots in TMR in the glossary under the entry for AA, stating that the order in question is a "secret society connected with the Ancient mysteries",

Interestingly, The symbol also crops up in witchcraft. Wikipedia reports:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Dots_Tattoo

One old association of the three-dot tattoo is that of the witch's mark. Though this mark may have been in any number of bodily locations in the more distant past, many Traditional Witchcraft practitioners receive the triangular three-dot symbol on a ring finger where it can be easily hidden from unfriendly eyes (but easily revealed to those of the Faith). The witch's mark is also called the "mark of Cain" or the "toad's footprint." Sometimes this mark merely indicates an Initiate in the Craft. However, it more frequently indicates a High Priestess or High Priest.

Cheers Paolo


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 Anonymous
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http://www.everything2.com/index.pl?node=Therefore

This site also claims the symbol may have come from alchemy but I don't know how credible that is. The site also claims that the alchemical symbol of salt is a set of three dots but I've never seen such a symbol for salt.

In any case, having studied Liber Pyramidos for some time, I have no trouble associating the dots with a pyramid.


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 Anonymous
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These three dots, hereinafter written ".'." are a form of ellipsis from Freemasonry. Technically, they refer to someone or some organisation that has the secrets of a Master Mason. Hence, a 3rd Degree Mason might style himself "Bro.'. John Smith", whilst the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite might be abbreviated "A.'. and A.'. S.'.R.'.." A number of hermetic (see Hermeticism) organisations have, quite presumptuously in some cases, adopted the use of .'. even though they cannot in any sense really be Masonic.

http://www.jwmt.org/v1n0/glossary2.html


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 Anonymous
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I believe it refers to ones grade in the blue degrees of Masonry, but I could be wrong. It always reminded me of the Supernal Triangle, as well... being deathless and such...

65 & 210,
111-418


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Proteus
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Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

They're honor marks representative of an inner order; i.e., an order possessing the proper investiture, as Paolo stated.

Love is the law, love under will.

John


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 Anonymous
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So in essense should one put this in his Magickal Name Like mine would be Frater K.·.H.·.A.·. Or would it be more correct if used as Frater KHA or Frater K.H.A. hahaha or should frater be only if within an order lol so much to understand haha thanks for being patient with me.


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 Anonymous
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Frater means "brother" and as a brother Thelemite, I don't see the issue of one using Frater 😉


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Azidonis
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93,

One mistake I learned in an embarassing way, is that when writing letters and speaking to a male, he is addressed like, "Care Frater", while the female is "Cara Soror".

Took years before anyone pointed that out to me.

93 93/93


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 Anonymous
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"Tool93" wrote:
So in essense should one put this in his Magickal Name Like mine would be Frater K.·.H.·.A.·. Or would it be more correct if used as Frater KHA or Frater K.H.A. hahaha or should frater be only if within an order lol so much to understand haha thanks for being patient with me.

Should? More correct? There is no law beyond Do what thou wilt. Theres a little leeway for being a bit original for once.


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 Anonymous
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Waite's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry uses that punctuation liberally in place of a period. To the best of my recollection, I haven't seen the .'. used in the literature of any Masonic "Blue Lodge" local to me. Occasionally (well, rarely) a brother will offer "salutation on all points of the triangle", though I heard this greeting a lot more hanging around people from AMORC. I would guess that tradition may have fallen out of more common use among Masons in the 20th century due to its lack of placement on standard typewriter layouts.

Given its use in math & mysticism, perhaps it is a short hand for the Pythagorean tetractys?


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 Anonymous
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I'm not sure any one of you has expressed an inaccurate theory as to the "meaning" of the three points .'. It does represent the Supernal Triad of the Tree of Life (so long as the receiver of this message assumes so). It also represents the three grades of Blue Lodge (so long as the receiver assumes so). It is basically all things three. Quite simply put, it means all things to all people. 🙂 Because really, it's just a stop suggesting abreviation. But it is a special stop, and only those in the know would know how special it is. 🙂

Oh, and BTW - it would A&F A.'.M.'. because York or Scottish, in the United States you are an Ancient & Free Accepted Mason so long as you are charted in a Blue Lodge.


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amadan-De
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"Every meaningful mathematical statement can also be expressed in plain language. Many plain-language statements of mathematical expressions would fill several pages, while to express them in mathematical notation might take as little as one line. One of the ways to achieve this remarkable compression is to use symbols to stand for statements, instructions and so on."

Lancelot Hogben

Replace 'mathematical' with 'esoteric'....(I always did like Lancelot Hogben 😉 )


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amadan-De
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It is basically all things three

except that it does signify something different from '.' or ... so not ALL things three.
Go on try out A&F A'.'M'.' and see what it gets ya! 😯


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 Anonymous
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http://www.staff.vu.edu.au/mcaonline/tool/symbols/symbol.html

The OP did not ask what .'. means in a mathematical discussion, but as an esoteric or literary form, .'. your " '.' " provides no topic relevant challenge to me. And '.' this post of mine is slightly off topic, please accept my apologies Paul.


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 Anonymous
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yeah I doubt A.·.A.·. is meant to be directly masonic (even tho a co-founder was Masonic) I figure I shouldnt use it quite yet till completely understood... If it comes it shall come, but until then...


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 Anonymous
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Discordians tend to use it to indicate they are the 'Real Deal'.

Although the extent to which they publicised this belief sort of limits its currency.


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Baxian
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Hi

My view is that the three dots symbol has to do with the Triangle of manifestation(as I understand this term). And that the saying "salutations on all points of the triangle"(which I have read and heard said by caliphate OTO and A.M.O.R.C. people) refers to this recognition of the neccessity of the 3 to come together for there to be creation and magic.
It seems to be a symbol of divinity and and the process of manifestation. A symbol of the inner process of magic. It's also a formula etc. IMO.
Really it's just a symbol and you can do what you like with it. Keeping it as a sacred symbol or looking at it as simple three dots IMO.

Baxian.


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Frater_HPK
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Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law

Three points in a triangular form (.·.) are placed after letters in a Masonic document to indicate that such letters are the initials of a Masonic title or of a technical word in Freemasonry, as G.·.M.·. for Grand Master, or G.·. L.·. for Grand Lodge. It is not a symbol, but simply a mark of abbreviation. The attempt, therefore, to trace it to the Hebrew three yods, a Cabalistic sign of the Tetragrammaton, or any other ancient symbol, is futile ... [It] is probable that the idea was suggested by the sacred character of the number three as a Masonic number, and these tree dots might refer to the position of the three officers in a French Lodge. Ragon says (Orthodoxie Maçonnique, page 71) that the mark was first used by the Grand Orient of France in a circular issued August 12, 1774, in which we read "G.·.L.·. de France." A common expression of anti-Masonic writers in France when referring to the Brethren of the Craft is Fréres Trois Points, Three Point Brothers, a term cultivated in their mischief survives in honor because reminding the brotherhood of cherished association and symbols. The abbreviation is now constantly used in Freneh documents, and, although not accepted by the English Freemasons, has been very generally adopted in other countries. In the United States, the use of this abbreviation is gradually extending.
-Mackey's Encyclopedia of Masonry

The three dots (.·.) ... were originally intended to represent "Masonic Honor Points". In Masonry, a freemason who has received the first three craft degrees of initiation may put these three dots after his name. Organizations made up of Craft initiated Masons traditionally place these same three dots after the letters of abbreviation of their organization names, e.g. Golden Dawn: G.·.D.·. instead of G.D. The practice is not strictly observed anymore in mystical organizations, but is still used in the original way by regular Masons. Now days, the three dots are often used indiscriminately to represent "mystical", "once connected to masonry", "the Christian divine trinity" and almost anything else. Some organizations, like O.T.O., do not use the three dot triangle in abbreviations of their names even though they are derived from Masonry. [Also note the usage, "Salutation on all points of the Triangle," apparently going back to John Yarker, is found in various OTO documents -F93]. The practice is often not followed when an abbreviation consists of exactly three letters, since three dots or periods are already in place."
-From the Outbasket, Thelema Lodge Calendar, June 1993

Love is the law, love under will

enjoy,

B.


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amadan-De
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Baccus93 seems to have missed what I was thinking...
Frater HPK's quote from Mackey's Encyclopedia of Masonry indicates that the first Masonic use of .'. was in 1774 (McKenzie's Royal Masonic Cyclopedia says the same), the first mathematical usage was over one hundred years before, this to me is interesting (archaeologist - I find tracing sources and first occurances potentially useful when examining things like iconography). I would not be overly surprised if there was a direct connection - the rigid boundaries between disciplines (e.g. Mathematics and Metaphysics - Newton wrote more on Alchemy than he did on Physics) is a recent aberration. Anyone have an in with Quatuor Coronati so we can check what their records say?

According to McKenzie .'. or '.' can be used interchangeably - apologies to Baccus93 seem in order, though personally I have never seen '.' used this way and the symbolism would seem quite different (if not opposite).


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 Anonymous
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"anpi" wrote:
"jdes" wrote:
In this scheme, hexagram would perhaps mean something close to "if and only if". 😮

Curriously the Latin word for 'if and only if' is the word 'sin'. Just thought I throw that one in to confuse everything.


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ianrons
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I don't know where you've got that from. It certainly doesn't fit any usage that I'm aware of. sīn means "but if".


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 Anonymous
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The triangle of dots indicates that the order is a secret sodality connected with the Ancient Mysteries. The triangle is the sign of Horus and represents fire, light or spirit. 'Salutation on All points of the Triangle' is a formula used by freemasons.

I know much of that information has been posted above but I'm assuming that since the originator of this topic is posting in a Thelemic forum, and is therefore quite likely to have noticed the abbreviation in some connection with Aleister Crowley, that the quote might be of interest, coming, as it does, from footnote 1 to chapter 19, part 1 of The Confessions of Aleister Crowley.


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 Anonymous
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I forgot where but I remember reading that the usage of three dots is meant to indicate the possession of the "Lost Word".


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 Anonymous
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thinking about .'. Madonna Oriflamma by Nicholas Roerich comes into my mind. he painted three big red points inside a red circle.
(recently there was also big uproar about an infamous red ring of death or RRoD with three red lights.)

in such cases the symbolism seems like the 'threefold nature of fire'. like the three Vav's that make up the fire letter Shin. trivially the Son, the Father and the Holy Spirit (as associated with the three fire signs Aries, Leo and Saggitaurus). in the sepher yetzirah, the threefold nature of fire as reigned by Shin, is associated with 'heaven in the universe', 'heat in the year' and 'the head of Man and Woman'.

as i understand it, the red triangle is generally associated with Horus (and fire), but the downwardpointing, red triange is specifically associated with the aspect of Horus as Hoor-Pa-Kraat. nevertheless, the red equilateral triangle is still fire, even though its pointing into the opposite direction compared to a pyra-mid. the direction of the symbol, seems therby overruled by the color of the symbol. without any color i guess, the downward pointing equilateral triange would rather symbolize water as a female element, or in the case of '.' the threefold nature of water?


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 Anonymous
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93

"Baxian" wrote:
It seems to be a symbol of divinity and and the process of manifestation. A symbol of the inner process of magic. It's also a formula etc. IMO.
Baxian.

In modern times the tune goes at least back to Dee's "Monas Hieroglyphica" and the "Steganographia" of Trithemius . The central concept of the ternary was later adopted in the whole Craft symbolism, including the degrees themselves:

. Apprentice
..Fellow
.'.Master (a degree which didn't exist in early Freemasonry)

93, 93/93


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 Anonymous
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"teth" wrote:
93

. Apprentice
..Fellow
.'.Master (a degree which didn't exist in early Freemasonry)

93, 93/93

Actually, I thought according to Knight & Lomas, it was the Fellow Craft that didn't exist in early Freemasonry, and was adopted with portion of the Mark Mason degree involved.


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