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Oil of Abramelin  


Cronus
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I own the paperback edition of "The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage" by Dover Publications. I was told that the recipe for Oil of Abramelin was included in this book but I cannot find it (there is no index either). I obviously haven't completed reading this book, so I was wondering if someone here who is familiar with this text could please provide me with the page number for this recipe? Thanks!


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 Anonymous
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Pages 76-77.


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 Anonymous
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This brings up another "technical question":

It DuQuette's My Life with the Spirits he describes the effect of getting Oil of Abramelin in one's eyes. From the description, it sounds his was prepared with undiluted essential oil of Cinnamon, which is really strong stuff! I have made my own Abramelin Oil, but merely steeped finely-ground powders in olive oil then filtered that, and it was relatively mild stuff.

Are there any oil/incense compounders out there who can clarify this?

nick


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 Anonymous
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Dear Cronus,

Olive oil forms the base of it. You then add cinnamon, myrrh and galangal (essential oils).

I've never done it to the specific recipe as I like being over powered by cinnamon, but myrrh and galangal should together equal about a quarter of the measure of the olive oil and the cinnamon about a half.

lashtal rotter


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Frater_HPK
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Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law

Galangal or calamus? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abramelin_oil#Abramelin_Oil

Just currious about effects of original recipe with calamus? Of course is information from the wikipedia correct.

Love is the law, love under will.

B.


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Cronus
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Thanks to everyone who replied, especially papanick - that's exactly what I was looking for! It's funny that you bring up that story in DuQuette's "My Life With the Spirits", because that's what first interested me in further researching this subject. I especially loved Lon's chapter on the evocation of Orobas, which as you know, refrences the recipe for Oil of Abramelin in "The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage", but doesn't provide the page number... He does state in that chapter that Oil of Abramelin is basically refined cinnamon oil (which was particularly hard to come by during that time - in the 60's I think it was - but he had an east coast friend who had sent him a small vial which he used in the evocation of Orobas ritual, which he got in his eyes, like you were talking about - which was hilarious to read, I had such a funny visual of the entire ritual in my mind by the way he described it). He even talks about how it was so potent, that when he first received the vial from his friend, he put a drop on his finger which he then dabbed on his forehead which instantly started to burn his skin, leaving behind a red spot. Pretty potent stuff from the sounds of it... Potent enough for him to leave his circle during the ritual after he got it in his eyes - which he knew NOT to do, but felt like he had no choice due to the possibility of the oil permanently damaging his eyes. Meanwhile, he commands Orobas to "stay!" in the triangle, waiting patiently for Lon to return from the bathroom washing his face!


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ianrons
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93,

It's galangal and not calamus. Galangal is the one ingredient which requires alcohol distillation, IIRC.

Cinnamon causes irritation of the skin in high concentrations, but I'm not fully aware of the effects upon the eye. I did look up the concentrate of the active ingredient (which is a lot stronger of course) in a proper medical textbook, and it didn't mention that it causes permanent eye damage. Bill Heidrick was rather cautious about the oil, referring to the eyes, in some internet publication of his; but I don't think he gave a reference. When buying cinnamon oil, make sure to get the oil prepared from the bark and not the [pusillanimously weak] leaf extract.

There was an article about the preparation of the oil by an OTO sister from the States several years back that I was shown by a friend; but the journal title I can't recall. Perhaps someone here can give a reference?

The description of the effects of the oil upon the skin given by Crowley in Book IV seems to refer to the oil prepared without the addition of olive oil, since it is otherwise too weak to thrill through "with a touch as of fire" (as Crowley's phrase was better restated to me a while back).

BTW, the oil is described by Abramelin as a "balsam", which (according to Jake Stratton-Kent, from another source I believe) was a term used during the period for a suspension of powdered herb/resin/gum (my interpolation) in oil. However, I have not found confirmation of the usage and would refer to the Catholic Encyclopedia.

93 93/93
Ian


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Frater_HPK
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Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Thank you for your explanation, but I will repeat my question. The folowing quote is from the Wikipedia:

_________________________________________________________________________________________
Here is the recipe for Jewish Holy Oil from the Bible:

Take thou also unto thee principal spices, of pure myrrh five hundred [shekels], and of sweet cinnamon half so much, [even] two hundred and fifty [shekels], and of sweet calamus two hundred and fifty [shekels], And of cassia five hundred [shekels], after the shekel of the sanctuary, and of oil olive an hin: And thou shalt make it an oil of holy ointment, an ointment compounded after the art of the apothecary: it shall be an holy anointing oil.

The Bible lists five ingredients: Myrrh, Cinnamon, Cassia, Calamus, and Olive oil.

The four ingedients listed by Abraham of Worms in The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage are Myrrh, Cinnamon, Calamus, and Olive oil.

Since Cinnamon and Cassia are two species of the same Cinnamomum genus, their doubling up into one name by the medieval author Abraham of Worms is not unexpected. His reasons for doing so may have been prompted by a pious decision to avoid duplicating true Holy Oil, or by a tacit admission that in medieval Europe, it was difficult to obtain Cinnamon and Cassia as separate products.

Samuel Mathers' Abramelin Oil

According to the S.L. MacGregor Mathers English translation, which derives from an incomplete French manuscript copy of the book, the recipe is as follows:

You shall prepare the sacred oil in this manner: Take of myrrh in tears, one part; of fine cinnamon, two parts; of galangal half a part; and the half of the total weight of these drugs of the best oil olive. The which aromatics you shall mix together according unto the art of the apothecary, and shall make thereof a balsam, the which you shall keep in a glass vial which you shall put within the cupboard (formed by the interior) of the altar. [1]

The four ingedients listed by Mathers in his translation of The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage are Myrrh, Cinnamon, Galangal, and Olive oil. The word that he translated from the French as "Galangal" is actually the word "Calamus." All of the other extant manuscripts, in German and Aramaic, also list "Calamus" as the ingredient. It is unknown if Mathers' use of Galangal instead of Calamus was intentional or a mistranslation, but it was to result in several notable changes, including symbolism and use.

Macerated Abramelin Oil

A recipe for Abramelin oil based upon the original German, French, or Aramaic texts is as follows:

* 4 parts Cinnamon bark quills, reduced to powder
* 2 parts Myrrh resin, finely ground
* 1 part Calamus chopped root, reduced to powder
* half of the foregoing total weight Olive oil

The mixture is macerated for one month, then decanted and bottled for use, producing a fragranced oil suitable for anointing any portion of the body, and will not burn the skin. It may be applied liberally, after the manner of traditional Jewish Holy Oils, such as the one which was poured on Aaron's head until it ran down his beard. It is not, however, made "according unto the art of the apothecary", since it is not distilled after the maceration but decanted into bottles.
________________________________________________________________________

My question is:

Is it possible that magicians, including Crowley, used wrong recipe for more than 100 years? Can someone post original French word Mathers translated as a Galangal? The new translation of Abramelin, with additional original parts of text not included in Mathers' translation, was announced on Lashtal site in July (or August). What is written in this new translation, galangal or calamus? If it is written calamus, should we all start to use new recipe with calamus instead galangal? Or we should't? This confuse me a little and I would like to hear opinios of others. Thank you.

Love is the law, love under will.

B.


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 Anonymous
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Interesting HPK...

I look forward to seeing Ian sinking his reductionistic knuckle-dusters into that one!

(he'll probably manage it)


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 Anonymous
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This essay did wonders for my understanding of this topic:

http://www.horusset.com/RIKB/abramelin.pdf

By an O.T.O. brother in America no less! Who'd have thought they did anything but copyright the name 'Thelema'?


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 Anonymous
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According to some scholars, cannabis was an ingredient of holy anointing oil mentioned in various sacred Hebrew texts. The herb of interest is most commonly known as kanah-bosim (קְנֵה-בֹשֶׂם) (the singular form of which would be kaneh-bos which is mentioned several times in the Old Testament as a bartering material, incense, and an ingredient in holy anointing oil used by the high priest of the temple. The Septuagint translates kaneh-bosm as calamus, and this translation has been propagated unchanged to most later translations of the old testament. However, Polish anthropologist Sula Benet published etymological arguments that the Aramaic word for hemp can be read as kannabos and appears to be a cognate to the modern word 'cannabis' with the root kan meaning "reed" or hemp and bosm meaning "fragrant". Both cannabis and calamus are fragrant, reedlike plants containing psychotropic compounds. Biblical scholars appear to be divided on the subject; most reject the cannabis hypothesis, and others affirm it.


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 Anonymous
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Wow! Holy Hash Oil. How cool is that?

nick


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ianrons
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93 Frater_HPK,

"Frater_HPK" wrote:
Thank you for your explanation, but I will repeat my question.

Apologies, I hadn't read your question properly. Dehn's book is still unavailable in the UK, and I suppose I just assumed I knew it all already 😳

Mathers seems to go down in my opinion every year, but if this really is a mistranslation then it's made its way irreversibly into the A.'.A.'. Ritual canon (Ritual VIII).

I'm really quite unsure about the interpretation of the "art of the apothecary" phrase; but initial investigations (i.e., by asking someone who's very familiar with period alchemical/herbal literature) suggest it does not mean distillation, but preparation of the ingredients by maceration and dissolution on a low heat (i.e., using dung).

I'm still very interested in the interpretation of the Hebrew term translated as calamus, so I'll be visiting the Wellcome Library at some point the future, and I hope to be able to share the results of my researches in due course. Once again, apologies for my idiot misreading of your question.

BTW, for anyone with access to Dehn, is the footnote "Or storax" included in the German MS. as an alternative to "stacté" in the incense recipe?

93 93/93
Ian


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 Anonymous
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This is a great thread!

My opinion is that there is some confusion between whatever Abraham of Worms' recipe may have been and the recipe Crowley described. To the best of my knowledge (and I may be wrong), the phrase "oil of Abramelin" first enters the THELEMA vocabulary in Liber AL III:23. In his commentary on III:23, Crowley gives the "Oil of Abramelin: take eight parts of oil of cinnamon, four of oil of myrrh, two of oil of galangal, seven of olive oil" recipe with proportions.

The Holy Oil described in Liber ABA, Part II, Chapter 5 includes these same ingredients but does NOT offer the proportions.

So the confusion I see is between the historical recipe for Abramelin Oil passed down from Abraham of Worms and the recipe for "oil of Abramelin" as an ingredient in a "cakes" recipe given by the Prophet of the Aeon in his commentary on Liber AL. While we can discuss and debate the origins and nuances of earlier recipes, ingredients, and preparation of various Holy Oils, I don't see the value in the context of Crowley as Prophet commenting on the fundamental Holy Book of the Aeon.

I do recommend a study of The Holy Oil chapter in Liber ABA. It is one of my personal favorites - even if it doesn't include the word Abramelin 😉

"The Galangal represents both Kether and Malkuth, The First and the Last, the One and the Many, since in this Oil they are One."


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 Anonymous
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"Frater_HPK" wrote:
Is it possible that magicians, including Crowley, used wrong recipe for more than 100 years? Can someone post original French word Mathers translated as a Galangal? The new translation of Abramelin, with additional original parts of text not included in Mathers' translation, was announced on Lashtal site in July (or August). What is written in this new translation, galangal or calamus? If it is written calamus, should we all start to use new recipe with calamus instead galangal? Or we should't? This confuse me a little and I would like to hear opinios of others. Thank you.

Love is the law, love under will.

B.

Well, considering that Calamus is toxic, I wouldn't particularly recommend switching to it for any use that involves consumption (such as in cakes of light). This has been cited to me as one reason why one would choose to go with galangal. The way I see it, when dealing with rituals which came about in the thelemic tradition, I see no reason to go back to using calamus, as this was never considered to be used in the ritual when it was created. When dealing with procedures directly from Abramelin the Mage, however, it is certainly worth considering to go back to using Calamus instead of Galangal. Also, it may be better to use the adjustment cited on wikipedia, or actually make the oil according to the "art of the apothecary" instead of using crowley's essential oil method when dealing with non-crowley rituals, as the end result is quite different, given that the ratios change drastically when you actually distill the oil as part of the process. In the end, its a matter of what works for you. But yea, don't go consuming calamus, unless you're trying to evoke the grim reaper.


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 Anonymous
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I have just received the new English translation of Abramelin, and the recipe for the oil will come as a shock to most. The oil described in the earliest extant Abramelin sources (all in German) actually contains all five ingredients for Jewish holy oil, not the four previously thought. (It should be noted that the Hebrew MS is from about 1740 and was actually translated from the German. Wikipedia hints that an Aramaic MS may exist, but there is no evidence to support this.) For all practical purposes, the recipe is identical, or nearly so, to the formula for holy oil found in the Bible, shown here:

"Take thou also unto thee principal spices, of pure myrrh five hundred [shekels], and of sweet cinnamon half so much, [even] two hundred and fifty [shekels], and of sweet calamus two hundred and fifty [shekels], And of cassia five hundred [shekels], after the shekel of the sanctuary, and of oil olive an hin: And thou shalt make it an oil of holy ointment, an ointment compounded after the art of the apothecary: it shall be an holy anointing oil." (A sheckel is a unit of weight, roughly half an ounce. A hin is about half a gallon.)

The controversial part of the Abramelin oil recipe, in Georg Dehn's German from which the English was translated, reads as follows:

"gleichviel Kalmus wie Cassien und soviel wie Myrrhe und gutes, frisches Olivenöl." (equal parts calmus and cassien, and as much myrrh and good, fresh olive oil.)

Oddly, Steven Guth's English translation lists "galanga root" in place of the calamus:

"Take one part of the best myrrh, half a part of cinnamon, one part of cassia, one part galanga root and a quarter of the combined total weight of good, fresh olive oil. Make these into an ointment or oil as is done by the chemists…"

Thankfully, two of the sources for this passage are provided in facsimile, and both clearly state "Calmus" or "Kalmus". The published German example, printed by Peter Hammer in 1725, reads:

"Nimm Mhrrhen des besten 1 Theil, Zimmt 1/2 Theil, soviel des Calmus als Zimmet, Cassien soviel als der Myrrhen im Gewicht und gutes frisches Baumöl..." (Take 1 part of the best myrrh, 1/2 part cinnamon, as much calamus as cinnamon, of cassia as much as the myrrh in weight and good fresh tree oil... -- my translation)

The above passage is practically the same recipe as that found in the Bible. Unfortunately the other facsimile of the German manuscript from 1608 (the earliest and most complete source) is written in script and too difficult for me to either transcribe or translate accurately, though the ingredients are recognizable.

I don't have access to the French MS that Mathers used to translate his edition. Georg Dehn acknowledges that Mathers' translation was extremely careful and accurate, and that only his source was faulty. It's safe to assume that the French MS contained the modified recipe that doubled the amount of cinnamon and omitted the cassia. Also, Mathers may have mis-translated the French word for calamus as "galangal", though Steven Guth came to the same conclusion. It's possible that "Kalmus" in early German actually meant "galangal" -- but my gut tells me this is unlikely.

Thus, authentic Abramelin oil, according to the earliest and most reliable sources we have available to us, contains the same five ingredients as Jewish holy oil: myrrh, cinnamon, calamus, cassia, and olive oil. Only the proportion of the calamus is in question (half vs. a whole part). In my opinion an oil made from either formula would be acceptable.

To throw a wrench into the works, a 2002 post to alt.magick by Catherine Yronwode claims that "cassia" actually means "acacia." Interesting, but I'm not fully convinced. Check out her argument for yourself:

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.magick/browse_thread/thread/aa8979545e7acb77/70b98fcfe5cf4cd9?lnk=st&q=Oil+of+Abramelin+Calamus+Cassie&rnum=1&hl=en#70b98fcfe5cf4cd9

I suppose that if you need help in the third eye department, you might try it out...

If you haven't ordered the new translation of Abramelin, by all means do so. It's a much easier read than Mathers, and all of the word squares are complete. It also has a wonderful appendix that details Georg Dehn's experiences tracking down and researching the various Abramelin manuscripts. He even journied to Araki where Abramelin is said to have lived. In spite of my tiny concern regarding the galanga root, Steven Guth's translation reads intelligently and like modern prose. This edition is clearly the one of choice, and likely to be the best available in our lifetimes.

In light of all this new information, I suppose the wikipedia article on Abramelin Oil should be updated. I just don't have it in me right now.


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 Anonymous
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93!

Ok, I have settled on the "original" four ingredients for the oil. Cinnamon, Calamus, Myrrh, & Olive oil. My questions are these; 1. What is meant exactly by "macerated", the best definition I can come up with is to soak. Seeing as how part of the mixture is olive oil is this saying, simply to sit for a month? Also Calamus root is a mild hallucinogenic (nontoxic) when ingested in small doses. Would there be any effect from exposure to skin? I would like to know in advance if my Holy Oil's gonna have any odd effects. Has anyone tried this particular recipe? Any experiences?
Q
93, 93/93


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 Anonymous
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"Take one part of the best myrrh, half a part of cinnamon, one part of cassia, one part galanga root and a quarter of the combined total weight of good, fresh olive oil. Make these into an ointment or oil as is done by the chemists…"

This I've done, although the results were less then spectacular. As such; unless you're dead set on making your own, somaluna.com carries a quality product. Otherwise, you can procure your ingredients there & be assured they're top notch quality.

And no Paul, I'm not advertising :o)


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 Anonymous
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"papanick" wrote:
This brings up another "technical question":

It DuQuette's My Life with the Spirits he describes the effect of getting Oil of Abramelin in one's eyes. From the description, it sounds his was prepared with undiluted essential oil of Cinnamon, which is really strong stuff! I have made my own Abramelin Oil, but merely steeped finely-ground powders in olive oil then filtered that, and it was relatively mild stuff.

Are there any oil/incense compounders out there who can clarify this?

nick

I find the stinging sensation of the oil can sometimes add to the effect. I would not dilute the oil myself.


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 Anonymous
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Thanks for the recipe!!!


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warriormonk93
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93!

My opinion is that the recipe for Holy Oil in Exodus WAS the basis of the Abramelin oil. In some translations of Exodus they mention Calamus, Calamus is a reed that grows in marshes, and is a stimulant and a hallucinogen in strong doses. Its not toxic. The native Canadian indians use it on their shamanic vision quests. Galangal is large root similar to ginger, commonly used in thai and vietnamese cooking. The recipe for Abramelin Oil is extensively analysed in Richard Alan Millers "Magical and Ritual Use of Perfumes" published by Destiny Books.


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 Anonymous
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93
Thank you for the link Sentinus, but I already have my ingredients, when I recieved my Calamus by mail order earlier this week and warnings were posted all over it, having no previous experience and limited knowledge of Calamus' effects, this is when I began to question it. Upon doing a little research I learned some where using the herb to get a buzz, etc. Well I'm not planning on eating it. : )
To clarify my question has anyone worked with Calamus? Also, I was under the impression Cassia, is just another part of the cinnamon tree, so that ingredient seemed a bit redundant to me. Thanks again for all your responses.
Q
93, 93/93


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AMTh
 AMTh
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93 all!

I heard from an O.T.O. brother here in Toronto, that the Galangal is a psychotropic, and causes mild hallucinations in large doses. Can anyone verify this statement?

93 93/93

Chris


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warriormonk93
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93!

As I mentionned, galangal (Kaempferia galanga) is a member of the Ginger family and used in asian cooking. "There are vague reports that Galangal is used hallucinogenically by natives of parts of New Guinea."

Youd have to eat a huge amount of the raw root = approx. 3" per person (the root is very thick 3 - 4" diameter).

Abramelin Oil wouldnt have the concentration needed to have any effect.

8 parts cinnamon oil
4 parts myhrr oil
2 parts galangal oil
7 parts olive oil

93, 93/93.


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 Anonymous
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In '21st Century Mage' Jason Augustus Newcomb gives what he calls the "True Incense of Abramelin"* being made of 1 part frankincense, 1/2 part storax and 1/4 part lign aloes. Due to the rarity and/or expense of the latter two he suggests that myrrh can be substituted for storax and cedar or sandalwood for lign aloes. I'm wondering if those are indeed helpful alternatives and also, in regards to sandalwood which, red or yellow, would more appropriately be used. Thanx in advance for any feedback!

*He also states that most people think the Incense of Abramelin is made of the mixed and ground dry ingredients of the Abramelin oil which he says resuls in a "foul-smelling mess". If anyone has made the IoA as described above what was the quality of the product?


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 Anonymous
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"Martialis" wrote:
In '21st Century Mage' Jason Augustus Newcomb gives what he calls the "True Incense of Abramelin"* being made of 1 part frankincense, 1/2 part storax and 1/4 part lign aloes. Due to the rarity and/or expense of the latter two he suggests that myrrh can be substituted for storax and cedar or sandalwood for lign aloes. I'm wondering if those are indeed helpful alternatives and also, in regards to sandalwood which, red or yellow, would more appropriately be used. Thanx in advance for any feedback!

*He also states that most people think the Incense of Abramelin is made of the mixed and ground dry ingredients of the Abramelin oil which he says resuls in a "foul-smelling mess". If anyone has made the IoA as described above what was the quality of the product?

93 Martialis,
I have seen ling-aloes replaced with cedar, rosewood, & sandalwood in the past. I would not use red sandalwood as it has closer affinities with venereal matters.
Regarding the incense as made from raw ingredients - the scent only becomes foul if you pile the incense. When it is used in small amounts then the ingredients burn more evenly & do not leave a smouldering mess of charred smoking wood.

- Danny N.

93 93/93


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warriormonk93
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93! Ive made the Abramelin incense several times. I still have some in my cupboard. The recipe I follow is exactly as AC's & the book of Abramelin. The difficulty nowadays is aquiring the liquid storax (Also known as liquid amber). The frankincense becomes coated in the gummy liquid storax, then the wood aloes powder adheres to it. The scent is sweet and pungent with a hint of leather. 93, 93/93.


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 Anonymous
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Thanx for the feedback, hopefully I end up with a good batch!


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warriormonk93
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93! Good luck! Its worth making it, as the scent is fantastic and unforgettable in ritual. 93, 93/93.


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 Anonymous
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93 calams (sweet flag)is used in ayurvedic as well here in the usa, and is safe .hay according to a online shaman wed site ,AC drank a mix of alpinia galanga : galanagal and turmeric, which he got when studying yoga.


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lashtal
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"ernest" wrote:
AC drank a mix of alpinia galanga : galanagal and turmeric, which he got when studying yoga.

Really? I don't recall reading that. Anyone have any supporting evidence?

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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 Anonymous
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"warriormonk93" wrote:
93! Ive made the Abramelin incense several times. I still have some in my cupboard. The recipe I follow is exactly as AC's & the book of Abramelin. The difficulty nowadays is aquiring the liquid storax (Also known as liquid amber). The frankincense becomes coated in the gummy liquid storax, then the wood aloes powder adheres to it. The scent is sweet and pungent with a hint of leather. 93, 93/93.

I had some liquid storax and while I liked the scent, the substance itself was damn annoying due in its tendency to stick to everywhere. The vial broke while I moved recently and as a result I had to throw away the vial and the box it was in. 🙂


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 Anonymous
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93,
I have always used raw storax bark which you can get here: http://www.somaluna.com/product.asp?p=1317&m=26
Storax(aka liquidambar) is the resin from the bark of the sweetgum tree...these trees grow all over the southern coast of north america - those spiky little balls that mottle the yards in autumn...they hurt like hell when you step on em! "..and you(the serpent) will strike his heel" - Gen. 3:15
Where are you guys purchasing liquidambar? I'd love to het my hands on some!

- Danny

93 93/93


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 Anonymous
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"DCXVI" wrote:
93,
I have always used raw storax bark which you can get here: http://www.somaluna.com/product.asp?p=1317&m=26
Storax(aka liquidambar) is the resin from the bark of the sweetgum tree...these trees grow all over the southern coast of north america - those spiky little balls that mottle the yards in autumn...they hurt like hell when you step on em! "..and you(the serpent) will strike his heel" - Gen. 3:15
Where are you guys purchasing liquidambar? I'd love to het my hands on some!

- Danny

93 93/93

I don't remember offhand where I got mine, it was several years ago from some place in internet. I also admit that I'm not an expert on this subject at all and I don't know if there are artificial and more authentic variants, however, the link that you pasted says they also sell liquid storax.


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warriormonk93
(@warriormonk93)
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93! I wholesale essential oils as a sideline, so at one point I bought all the stock available from one of my suppliers. They can't get it anymore, hence its scarce in these parts anyhow. But this online store sells it: http://www.somaluna.com/prod/storax_resin.asp 93, 93/93.


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 Anonymous
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"anpi" wrote:
the link that you pasted says they also sell liquid storax.

ah! I found it...this is a new link - they did not use to carry it! I am ordering some & will let you guys know the quality...thanks anpi!

93 93/93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Hehe...funny I was just about to post that Somaluna link but it looks like Warriormonk93 got to it before me, they seem to have a good selection.


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Walterfive
(@walterfive)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 856
 

A friend of mine was a perfume maker, he says that galangal is very tricky; you have to have a source that is fresh, because it can turn rancid very quickly and easily. He couldn't guarantee his source of it, which was rather expensive, so I gave up on him making me quantities of Abramelin Oil. 🙁

You need to cut the mixture with the olive oil because without it, it *does* burn the skin. Really. Leaves a red welt that lasts for hours or even days depending on how sensitive your skin is... seen it happen. And be REAL CAREFUL when applying it to the Mulhadara Chakra!!! (Ow!! Worse than Tiger Balm on yer bung-hole!)


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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IMHO the real question is why there is so few of the olive oil? As a basic, vegetable oil, it has really another qualities that other ingrediences in there, which are more aromatic and volatile. I make massage oils sometimes and I know, the cinnamon for example must be cut many times by weight. And even very small amount of cinnamon in vegetable oil may provoke the heat of the skin (used for it in natural cosmetics for massages and anti-cellulite wraps). So it may be suicide to put this oil almost pure in the eyes...

The olive oil and in this small amount confuses me, because it is wholly another substance than the rest of the ingrediences. It would be more understandable for me if there was more of an olive oil. Then it would be applied on the skin with beautiful warming effects without the risk of burning and actually damaging the skin.

Are you all perfecly sure that there should be only so few of an olive oil? And if so, is it only for symbolic purpose or for something else? It is for example recommended to put essential oils into a few drops of vegetable oil to put in the bath because only essential oil normally doesnt mix with water (it stays in the bubbles or in the cluster), it must be shaked well to mix - and try to shake the bath of the water :)... The mixture of vegetable and essential oil doesnt mix with the water too, but it is overspread on the water surface. It may be mixed better too when used as the spice like in the Cakes but it hadnt been ment for it at the first place...


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law.

I have been wanting to make Cakes of Light for the Mass of the Phoenix Ritual and I need to make Abramelin Oil. I don't make oils every day 😆 So I don't know what is meant by parts When I see parts this and that I am kind of confused. I am guessing it means ratio...? Anyone here can shed some light on this?

On another note I have read some previous descriptions on wine leaving I think the boiling down would be more accurate. Because adding yeast and the vodka I think is a little... artificial...


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lashtal
(@lashtal)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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A quick search of our very own Encyclopedia Thelemica reveals this: http://www.lashtal.com/wiki/Oil_of_Abramelin

But you'd have searched there first, surely?

😉

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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lashtal
(@lashtal)
Owner and Editor Admin
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 5329
 

There's much of interest here also: http://www.lashtal.com/nuke/PNphpBB2-viewtopic-t-1301-highlight-abramelin.phtml

I've tacked your new thread onto the end of that one.

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

I still have a vial of Abramelin Oil given to me by Ebony Anpu about 25 years ago, it is petrified but it still smells good.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law.

I figured it would be of best interest to tag it along with this thread seeing that making a new one would just make too many on this subject =P. However I am getting a Water Distillation Kit for Essential Oils and I can across a problem before ordering the ingredients... Now what part of each ingredient do I use in the making of the oil? For instance Essential Cinnamon Oil do I use the Leaf or the Bark? and with Galangal.. the root? And what part of Myrrh? Or do I use the entirety of all of them?

pre-thanks to any insights 😆

-Frater Nepios

Love is the law, love under will.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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93!
Care Frater Nepios,
You would want to distill the rhizomes (roots) of the galangal, unless you are using the greater galangal (alpinia), in which case they will not distill, you must use solvent extraction and will not end up with a fluid, liquid oil, but a waxy semi-solid at room tempertaure. You must melt it in a bain-marie before you can weigh it out & add to your other ingredients. The cinnamon will be distilled from the bark, and the myrrh will not be distilled. Myrrh is a resin from the tree. The tree is scored to create slits in the bark that seep sap, which then hardens & is the myrrh resin. A word of warning though - both cinnamon & galangal are very low-yield materials for distillation. You will likely need 25+ pounds of raw material to produce an essential oil of any appreciable volume. I'm not trying to discourage you, but it would be much more efficient in terms of time & also expense to just buy these essential oils pre-made. Just my opinion though from experience in the perfumery industry....
Regards,
Frater Aphetos
93-93/93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Edited to add: I meant to say that you can distill the alpinia galanga, but you will still get the crystalization at room temperature. this is due to the high concentration of methyl cinnimate (almost 50% in most cases!). Solvent extraction is a better choice fo this material IMHO...


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