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Pranayama in corpse pose?


Anonymous
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93

From personal experience and from conversing with yogis I hear that pranayama minus a perfectly erect spine is damaging because it puts an unnatural strain on the body's muscular-skeletal system.  The lungs/wind-bags are being fully expanded and blown -up to the hilt but if the spine is not straight then the pressure spills over elsewhere in the body.

That said , the corpse pose is just that.  The spine is supported by the floor and is perfectly straight however some yogis advise against it. 

Any advice?


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Michael Staley
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I've always thought that the spine has a natural curvature to it, and can never be "perfectly straight".


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Anonymous
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"Michael Staley" wrote:
I've always thought that the spine has a natural curvature to it, and can never be "perfectly straight".

93

Yes confusingly enough the common notion of  a straight spine does miss that fact that it is an "S" shape when poised.  Sorry I meant positioned in it's natural "straight" curvature as it is when in corpse pose?


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Azidonis
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Corpse pose, aka cooldown pose, useful after the practice of bending yourself into another position for long periods of time, hoping it will excite some energy into blowing your mind out of your skull.


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Anonymous
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"Azidonis" wrote:
Corpse pose, aka cooldown pose, useful after the practice of bending yourself into another position for long periods of time, hoping it will excite some energy into blowing your mind out of your skull.

thanks for that.  You completely avoided my question in the OP but thanks anyway 🙂


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Azidonis
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"david" wrote:
"Azidonis" wrote:
Corpse pose, aka cooldown pose, useful after the practice of bending yourself into another position for long periods of time, hoping it will excite some energy into blowing your mind out of your skull.

thanks for that.  You completely avoided my question in the OP but thanks anyway 🙂

Look again.


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Anonymous
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"Azidonis" wrote:
"david" wrote:
"Azidonis" wrote:
Corpse pose, aka cooldown pose, useful after the practice of bending yourself into another position for long periods of time, hoping it will excite some energy into blowing your mind out of your skull.

thanks for that.  You completely avoided my question in the OP but thanks anyway 🙂

Look again.

Ditto.

I am talking  about using corpse pose as an asana without any warm up and not as  some sort of yogic circuit- training trip.  Once again though, thanks for your idea, it sounds good.


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Azidonis
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Ahem.

"Lying upon one's back on the ground at full length like a corpse is called Savasana. This relieves the fatique caused by the other asanas, and induces calmness of mind." - Hathayoga Pradipika, P. 27

From Book 4, Revised 2nd Edition, P. 607 Footnote on Figures 33E-33G, which includes "The Corpse" - "These three recumbent positions are more suitable for repose after meditation than for meditation itself." [This is a part of Liber E, the illustrations.]

If you want to use it as an asana in the generally understood sense of the term (ie. to perform meditation practices/ awaken kundalini), then good luck to you. But that is not how it is commonly recommended, and there are multiple reasons for that.


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Anonymous
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"Azidonis" wrote:
Ahem.

"Lying upon one's back on the ground at full length like a corpse is called Savasana. This relieves the fatique caused by the other asanas, and induces calmness of mind." - Hathayoga Pradipika, P. 27

From Book 4, Revised 2nd Edition, P. 607 Footnote on Figures 33E-33G, which includes "The Corpse" - "These three recumbent positions are more suitable for repose after meditation than for meditation itself." [This is a part of Liber E, the illustrations.]

If you want to use it as an asana in the generally understood sense of the term (ie. to perform meditation practices/ awaken kundalini), then good luck to you. But that is not how it is commonly recommended, and there are multiple reasons for that.

Thankyou, very informative and helpful. 


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 Anonymous
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"Azidonis" wrote:
Ahem.

"Lying upon one's back on the ground at full length like a corpse is called Savasana. This relieves the fatique caused by the other asanas, and induces calmness of mind." - Hathayoga Pradipika, P. 27

From Book 4, Revised 2nd Edition, P. 607 Footnote on Figures 33E-33G, which includes "The Corpse" - "These three recumbent positions are more suitable for repose after meditation than for meditation itself." [This is a part of Liber E, the illustrations.]

If you want to use it as an asana in the generally understood sense of the term (ie. to perform meditation practices/ awaken kundalini), then good luck to you. But that is not how it is commonly recommended, and there are multiple reasons for that.

The Ace of Swords-thy corpse shall look. Like Agag's did, in Samuel's book!

Someone new to asana/pranayama should not start with this pose in my opinion, since even though many don't like to admit it, it is way too comfortable and the student just probably ends up lying on the ground breathing and 'relaxing' totally missing the whole point of the exercise. This is practically what western mind these days understand when someone mentions the word 'Yoga'.

"Eight lectures on Yoga" wrote:
The real object of Asana is control of the muscular system, conscious and unconscious, so that no messages from the body can reach the mind. Asana is concerned with the static aspect of the body. Pranayama is really the control of the dynamic aspect of the body.

Those more familiar with the western hermetic tradition and the Taro should study the symbolism of the Hierophant and it's connection with the breath of life and the physical body in general.
The Throne refers to Vau: the Heart must support and admit the lordship of the higher consciousness of the magician. The Altar may also be attributed to Taurus on account of its solidity and its function of bearing the higher elements of the magician.

Same way, the magical power associated with this card is also called The Secret of Physical Strength.

Many of the top athletes of the past and present have conquered this condition to a degree that one becomes immune to physical pain itself and they most probably have never even heard of the above mentioned practices in their life.

One can waste years and years with these exercises and become extremely frustrated without seeing any fruits or signs of progress. This depends on the type and nature of the student. The other one might conquer this condition through totally different methods, some may get the idea in some cozy Indian yoga school retreat, while the other who is virile and active might find the association and lesson through extreme violence and pushing their minds and bodies to their extreme limits. It's totally irrelevant how one arrives to the conclusion, but in the end physical body will become a perfect vehicle of the magician - per fas et nefas. Hatha Yoga should be understood as Violence.


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Azidonis
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"ayino" wrote:
Someone new to asana/pranayama should not start with this pose in my opinion, since even though many don't like to admit it, it is way too comfortable and the student just probably ends up lying on the ground breathing and 'relaxing' totally missing the whole point of the exercise. This is practically what western mind these days understand when someone mentions the word 'Yoga'.

I agree. All we need is more people lying down for a nap and calling it Samadhi.

The pose, any pose for "Asana proper" (ie. other than cooldown), should contain an element of tension, but also an element of comfort. Relaxed, but alert.

Lethargy and Restlessness are Enemies of Meditation.


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"Azidonis" wrote:
I agree. All we need is more people lying down for a nap and calling it Samadhi.

The pose, any pose for "Asana proper" (ie. other than cooldown), should contain an element of tension, but also an element of comfort. Relaxed, but alert.

Lethargy and Restlessness are Enemies of Meditation.

"The shedding of blood is necessary, for God did not hear the children of Eve until blood was shed. And that is external religion; but Cain spake not with God, nor had the mark of initiation upon his brow, so that he was shunned of all men, until he had shed blood. And this blood was the blood of his brother. This is a mystery of the sixth key of the Tarot, which ought not to be called The Lovers, but The Brothers

I still remain my stand, to truly exceed and triumph in asana/pranayama proper, one must not be like the meek King David, but take it by Force. If even one element is left unconquered, it will tear down the whole kingdom.

The Ace of Swords-thy corpse shall look. Like Agag's did, in Samuel's book!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agag

When he received the command to smite Amalek (I Sam. xv. 3), Saul said: "For one found slain the Torah requires a sin offering [Deut. xxi. 1-9]; and here so many shall be slain. If the old have sinned, why should the young suffer; and if men have been guilty, why should the cattle be destroyed?" It was this mildness that cost him his crown

"You have rejected the word of the LORD, and the LORD has rejected you as king over Israel."

Show no Mercy.


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Anonymous
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Here here
That king David reference, was it a coincidence lol?


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"david" wrote:
Here here
That king David reference, was it a coincidence lol?

Intended to be a metaphor. The only good thing that old fart produced anyway was his bastard child Solomon and even he almost blew the whole thing up by messing up with Asmodeus. Even Lord Indra (Master of the Senses) in the Indian fables molests Ahilya, no wonder the whole Catholic church is practically a huge international child molestation -ring.


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Azidonis
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Guṇa


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Shiva
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"You need not practice any yogic techniques in order to experience these things. By taking
drugs you can have all these experiences. I am not at all advocating drugs any more than I am
advocating yoga. I am just pointing out that all experience is born out of thought and is in all the
essentials identical. If you call these yogic or drug-induced states blissful, more profound, or in
any way more pleasurable than "ordinary" experiences, you are strengthening the ego and
fortifying the separative structure by wasting your thoughts translating sensations into higher or
lower and pleasurable or painful."  - UG Krishnamurti


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ptoner
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One man's straight... Is another man's bent


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 Anonymous
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Hi David,

there exist branches of Yoga which deal with many and various postures, both entailing an erect spine and, say, curvelinear asana's. These branches are known as "Moola," "Bandha," and "Mudra's."

The doctrine underlying these branches is that in the same manner as the muscular skeletal system requirea stretching and massaging, so too do the internal organs,  membranes, glands &ct require thus likewise.

There are numerous asana' s, some involving erect spinal postures,  many wherein which the torso is twisted and/or the spine is concave or convex - unto which always add a pranayama element whether directed thus or nay.

There is a photo of Aleister Crowley bending forward in an asana whereto he holds his right foot with his right hand. (Currently c.f. fails me).

I am not aware of direct western medical proof of the efficacies of the desired aims of each practice,  however,  with some elements I have practiced there are reifications wherein which there is a definite perception of the target area achieving the intended manipulation

By thus inspection it is false assumption the assertions that the spine must necessarily be erect.

Regarss


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Shiva
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"Atua Paul Alton Ngatai" wrote:
... it is false assumption the assertions that the spine must necessarily be erect.

Raja (chair-sitting) & Kundalini (fire-serpent-rising) yoga(s) imply erect head & "straight" (s-shaped, of course) spine, due to rocket ship ascending up sushumna. However, hatha yoga involves all kinds of pretzeline shapes and contortions, and thus a "straight" spine would not be required.

It all depends on WHY one is doing the "yoga" in the first place.


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 Anonymous
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Hi Shiva,

I agree, there must be a reason for entering into such practices. I think the key, as in all things worth doing,  is if one includes yogic practices as elements uupontheir various journeys, it has to be a committment - no half-baked half-hearted meanderings.

Futhermore, I don't believe it necessary at all to practice any classes of those phenomenon falling under the auspices of Yoga. I mean Crowley attained the grade of Adeptus Minor without being aware of meditation to any profundity.

The imagination is, I believe, the most important of ritual elements,  since without the imagination there is no prospect for Magick.

Each to his or her own

Regards


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Anonymous
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"Shiva" wrote:
"You need not practice any yogic techniques in order to experience these things. By taking
drugs you can have all these experiences. I am not at all advocating drugs any more than I am
advocating yoga. I am just pointing out that all experience is born out of thought and is in all the
essentials identical. If you call these yogic or drug-induced states blissful, more profound, or in
any way more pleasurable than "ordinary" experiences, you are strengthening the ego and
fortifying the separative structure by wasting your thoughts translating sensations into higher or
lower and pleasurable or painful."  - UG Krishnamurti

93

Come on.  Lunatic logic or what


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Anonymous
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"Atua Paul Alton Ngatai" wrote:

By thus inspection it is false assumption the assertions that the spine must necessarily be erect.

Regarss

93

Jesus!  The spine needs to be erect when doing prolonged e.g. an hour of pranayama otherwise you fuck your spine up, the lower back it would seem.  If the lungs are restricted when pumped to their maximum then the strain will go elsewhere , right   


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Anonymous
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"Shiva" wrote:
"Atua Paul Alton Ngatai" wrote:
... it is false assumption the assertions that the spine must necessarily be erect.

Raja (chair-sitting) & Kundalini (fire-serpent-rising) yoga(s) imply erect head & "straight" (s-shaped, of course) spine, due to rocket ship ascending up sushumna. However, hatha yoga involves all kinds of pretzeline shapes and contortions, and thus a "straight" spine would not be required.

It all depends on WHY one is doing the "yoga" in the first place.

The hatha is a mere limbering /loosening up for the kundalini/pranayama practices.  See A A curriculum.


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Michael Staley
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"david" wrote:
The hatha is a mere limbering /loosening up for the kundalini/pranayama practices.  See A A curriculum.

The author of the A∴A∴ doubtless had a limited view of hatha, but there are traditions in India which regard it one of the eight limbs of raja yoga, hence a bit more than "limbering/loosening up". Once again, though, we see this attitude from you that Crowley said it was so, and therefore it must be so.


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