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The True Grimoire by Jake Stratton Kent.


 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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I am hoping that there are some people on here who have read through Stratton-Kent's The True Grimoire (volume one) will be able to enlighten me. I found the book incredibly fascinating but fustrating at the same time. Stratton-Kent's writing was informative but.. at the same time incredibly "cagey" and evasive.

The book does address some of the more "sore" points of The Goetia (eg: the issue over using lamb skin, and the more dubious practice of using young boys/children to scry for the "operator" mentioned in older Goetic scripts). But the writing doesnt draw conclusions on a moral level either way.

But what got my attention was on p187 where Stratton-Kent suggests that the circle most suitable for Goetic use is one where the triangle is within the circle and not outside it. He uses the example of an illustration from Le Dragon Rouge to illustrate his point. But he doesnt explain why (maybe thats for volume two?).

In my opinion this has always been the weak spot in Goetic magic. There is at least 6 variations of circle in Goetic literature, and no writer has touched this issue yet.

Opinon and ideas please.


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spike418
(@spike418)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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Can I suggest you post this on the Grimorium Verum yahoo group where Jake is a moderator and would I guess, be happy to answer your question. In fact there is quite a discussion on circles going on there today!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Hi Spike 418.

Thanks for your suggestion. Whats your opinion on Startton-Kents writing? Are you still reading through the book yourself?

Best Regards.


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spike418
(@spike418)
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"hawthornrussell" wrote:
Hi Spike 418.

Thanks for your suggestion. Whats your opinion on Startton-Kents writing? Are you still reading through the book yourself?

Best Regards.

Thelema Hawthornrussell

I have read through the book once fully and am now dipping back in subject by subject and making copious notes.

I like Jake's writing immensely and must admit I found your original comment about "cagey" and evasive surprising. However, I am acutely aware that my impression could be coloured as I first met Jake in 1981, I consider him a good friend and we share a few opinions and tastes in non-magical matters as well! I imagine he would be horrified at being called cagey 😆

Perhaps you may also be interested in Hadean Press Guides to the Underworld? I particularly like the Elelogap pamphlet. Please be assured that I am not on a commission basis 😉

ALWays

Spike


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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I'm about to order this one myself. The Goes Edition, I thought was absolutely beautiful! I'm gonna have to be satisfied with the Deaths Head Edition, though. I like that one as well, and I am positive that I'll be satisfied with this Tome. I'm really looking foward to his notes!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Given that the book has a discussion group moderated by the author on Yahoo, I think the book covers issues that can be particularly relevant to Thelemic Magick. In much of Crowleys work, where Goetia is referred to it refers particularly to the Goetia of Solomon the King. The principle apparatus of the Goetia of the Lesser Key, the circle and the triangle, have become the standard in works of Evocation in modern magic. But Stratton-Kent points out that this technique only pertains to a very particular technique drawn from a fairly modern grimoire which is itself a very unique ext among grimoires. Surely we have Crowley to thank for making the Goetia of Solomon the King more accessible to modern magicians, and now we have Stratton-Kent to thank for opening up this ancient art and revealing its true significance and for making it's techniques accessible to post modern magicians.
The use of the triangle within the circle for Goetic magic has its parallels in Crowleys system of ceremonial magick given in Book 4 parts 2 and 3 and in rituals such as Liber Pyramidos, and I understand that Stratton-Kent himself makes use of his ritual in his conjurations. Though the full implications of this are rather lost on me, it gives the magician a modern ceremonial context from which to perform Goetic conjurations that is still keeping within the traditions of the art.
I have also been enjoying his Geosophia, which is now available in paperback unlimited edition as well.


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James
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The triangle in the circle is discussed in Skinner & Rankine's Goetia of Dr. Rudd which appears in the bibliography of JSK's Geospohia. I'd second Aeternitas' comment on this work and add I think the author has done a real service to goetia in linking not only that but Western magic to its Classical past. I would highly recommend Geosophia as accompaniment to the True Grimoire.


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michaelclarke18
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Joined: 15 years ago
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I have looked through the book, but it didn't really appeal to me.

I find JSK both an intelligent writer and a thorough researcher. Though I think with this work, he has done what I thought was impossible. Removed all sense of mystery & interest from this text and made it quite banal.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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I used to have J.S.K.'s "True Grimoire" but I got rid of it because I never used it (and I needed the room on my bookshelves). If I'm going to do that type of "Low Magick" I just use the less complicated technique's of Spare. I thought his history of the book was interesting though. His use of Liber Pyramidos is really interesting, although I've not read his articles in "The Equinox" journal from Australia, right?


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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I still dont get why the "lowmagick/highmagick" distinction has to come into play. I certainly dont consider the techniques of Spare to be low magick of any sort. I think with the True Grimoire and Geosophia, Kent is trying to elevate this rather lost art to its former glory. We've kind of taken a spirit negative even a magic negative attitude in some ways here in the west, even as magicians. I find it less and less relevant all the time.
That said, I found it interesting where JSK draws parrallels between the Grimoirum Verum and the sigils of Spare, who was likely familiar with the book himself.


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AdoniaZanoni
(@adoniazanoni)
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As for the True Grimoire aka Grimoire Verum, it always seems like an incomplete text itself. Joseph Peterson’s Grimoire Verum is the best version of the text by itself.

When examining the text I use five sources:
Waite’s Book of Ceremonial Magic
Shah’s Secret Lore of Magic
Grimoire Verum published by Trident
Grimoire Verum by Joseph Peterson
The True Grimoire by Jake Stratton-Kent's True Grimoire.

Jake does not provide the straight text like Peterson but the commentary and deciphering of sigils shows his value as a writer and researcher. Comparing the sigil of Silcharde to the sigil of the pact of Urban Grandier was surprising. The Frimost sigil and wand seal was another eye opener. His attempt to tie the Goetia Hierarchy to The Grimoire Verum was another surprise. He is an actual practitioner who has applied the Grimoire. His analysis and commentary are invaluable since the text itself is not explanatory in great detail. He may have left a few details such as what was mentioned on the initial post on the Red Dragron circle.

I found his linking of the Brazilian faith of Quimbanda to be amazing and remarkable. His comparing of their sigils as the Grimoire Verum of the New World fascinated me.

Here is a review from Dan Harms of the True Grimoire. He is more verbose and detailed that I.
http://danharms.wordpress.com/2009/04/27/on-the-shelf-review-the-true-grimoire-part-1/

http://danharms.wordpress.com/2009/05/01/on-the-shelf-review-the-true-grimoire-part-2/

http://danharms.wordpress.com/2009/05/06/on-the-shelf-review-the-true-grimoire-part-3/

As for the Geosophia, this is what I was not expecting. The books reads like a historical text when it his theory of how the Grimoire tradition existed in Greece.

It even seems he is almost the equivalent Chariots of the Gods by Erich von Daniken in terms of presenting the Grimoire history. Please note I have not read the volumes thoroughly because the text is tiresome. Perhaps if I can finish the texts my opinion may change.

Here is a review by Dan Harms:
http://danharms.wordpress.com/2011/02/09/on-the-shelf-review-geosophia/

Please note Teitan published the Red Dragon recently. It was a nice surprise. This grimoire started off seriously in the first part and became ridiculous in the later half. I could not stop laughing at its recipe for abortion.

Here is another review by Dan Harms:
http://danharms.wordpress.com/2011/02/21/on-the-shelf-review-the-red-dragon-or-dragon-rouge/


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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"AdoniaZanoni" wrote:
I found his linking of the Brazilian faith of Quimbanda to be amazing and remarkable. His comparing of their sigils as the Grimoire Verum of the New World fascinated me.

H/

Actually the linking of the entities of the GV to Quimbanda-entities does not originate with Jake but has been done in various strands of Quimbanda in Brazil for a longer time. However, there also exist Quimbanda without the attributing of Goetic demons. As I was told here in Brazil, many Quimbanda purists actually are quite against such relating as they perceive the demons of the Western grimoires to have a very different 'frequency' to the Quimbanda spirits.
Best
David


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