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ignant666
(@ignant666)
Elderly American druggie
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Posted by: @david-dom-lemieux

Which scientist unearthed evidence for those 3 foot high people?

https://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/human-fossils/species/homo-floresiensis


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toadstoolwe
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@david-dom-lemieux https://discovermagazine.com "Meet homo Floresiensis, the real-life hobbits of Indonesia"

http://nationalgeographic magazine.com, Hobbit-like ancestor found in Asia. and a handful of other articles.

 

 

 


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David Dom Lemieux
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

@david-dom-lemieux https://discovermagazine.com "Meet homo Floresiensis, the real-life hobbits of Indonesia"

http://nationalgeographic magazine.com, Hobbit-like ancestor found in Asia. and a handful of other articles.

 

 

 

 Meet Homo floresiensis: The Real-life Hobbits of Indonesia | Discover Magazine

Any evidence for human giants?

 

https://www.lashtal.com/wiki/Aleister_Crowley_Timeline


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Shiva
(@shiva)
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Please note that, overall, human DNA consists of 2% Neanderthal genetic material, so the best part of them (the part that survived) were not dead-end kids.

Put that in your laboratory oven and cook it at F 451* 'til it smokes. Do not ask for proof. Just search for it, like Ignant did. It's there.

Oh, but it's much worse than that. Each of us has, at the Core of our neural CPU, a reptile brain. The very first circuit itself, in all it's Advance, Withdraw, Upon Them glory ...

This central core of our brain(s) is not even a lizard. A liz has four legs (limbs), and thus it has a limbric brain that surrounds its serpent core. 

So, historically speaking, and from the viewpoint of biological history, we all have a serpent in our garden. Physically, we all have a single spermatozoon at the beginning of our biological history. The force that moves these wiggling things around is known to us as Hadit.

  


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toadstoolwe
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@shiva You are correct.  I am aware that there are different theories about the demise of the Neanderthal.  Some believe they have been slowly eradicated by the more evolved Cro-Magnons, through warfare, or depleted resources.  Or, as you suggest, inter-breeding with the  Cro-Magnons.  As for the theory of the Reptilian complex, and the paleomammalian complex, ( Limbic system )i the neocortex,(neomammalian) first postulated by Paul D. Maclean in the 1970s, has largely been discounted by current neuroscience research.  While there is grain of truth to the idea of a "reptilian complex" that would guide our more primitive responses to certain situation, it is by no means a 100% fact.

As for the "serpentine brain theory" as opposed to lizard brains, how is it that snakes evolved from lizards millions of years LATER?  Of course, if you are speaking symbolically of certain levels of insight as it relates to the Sephiroth, then yes, I could accept that.

 


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toadstoolwe
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@david-dom-lemieux Well, Yes and no.  Fossil evidence suggests the existence of an extinct species of apes known as Gigantopithecus blacki  which might serve as  a possible explanation for giants in myth and legend.  That's one idea, the other the rare genetic condition called Gigantism that affects humans.  So, in that respect, Yes giants exist, and have existed through the centuries.


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Shiva
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

As for the theory of the Reptilian complex

Um, this is not theory, except within the broader concept that everything is illusion., and therefore theoretical. Please enroll in medical school or take an Anatomy major - with laboratory dissection. The specific course is Brain 101 - with Lab.

Posted by: @toadstoolwe

(neomammalian) first postulated by Paul D. Maclean in the 1970s

I see you have been hanging around in Wikipedia again. Are you addicted? I enrolled in Brain 101 in 1961, and the were the Snake, Limb(ic) and Cortexial stages or layers. So anything imagined by some Paul D in the 70s, or the censure or disbelief in his aberrations, have no effect on my ancient, pre-computer knowledge.

Posted by: @toadstoolwe

While there is grain of truth to the idea of a "reptilian complex" that would guide our more primitive responses to certain situation, it is by no means a 100% fact.

I can prove it to you, 100%. Not wiki Wiki or writing, but by capturing you and subjecting you to atrocities for 90 days, daily, nightly. Hunger, pain, flashing lights. You will be broken down into your most primitive state. Methamphetamine will help the descent. When you are getting close to living or dying, the serpentine Toadstool (we) will be easy to see and capture on video.

[^] this is not a threat. I would not do such a thing to you. I am basically a benevolent being. You will have to hire your own captor. I will be available only for the purpose of recording your brain hologram (showing which parts of the brain are active). 

You are swimming in water that is way over your head, citing the Wiki rag in your arguments about things that are not within your gnosis. WellRead does this a lot. He makes debate by endlessly citing quoted material. We have persuaded him to occasionally cite his own experience, or at least his thoughts, on the subject matter at hand.

I would ecourage you to do likewise. If you practice Liber Jugorum (a form of dissection on yourself) in relation to Wikipedia for eleven days, you might have a 50/50 chance of breaking the addiction.

Posted by: @toadstoolwe

how is it that snakes evolved from lizard

There is no "evolution." Deen ye not of change. All is as it ever was. None shall be lifted up [evolved] or cast down [devolved].

Posted by: @toadstoolwe

as it relates to the Sephiroth, then yes, I could accept that.

The spheres, the neurocircuits, the anatomy - these are all the same thing.

 


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toadstoolwe
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Not be being a neuroscientist, or physician as you are (or were) I sort have to use Wiki "Rag" for at least putting me on I hope the right track.  Yes, I may well be over my head in these matters, but at least I dip my toe in it.  (What is the old adage, a little learning is a dangerous thing?)

So, I admit I have an addiction to Wikipedia, the first step in recovery is admitting I have a problem.

As far as evolution is concerned, that is simply a matter of opinion.  I happen to "believe" or should I say accept the notion of natural selection and evolution.  I don't think that evolution and the somewhat grandiose proclamation of an Aeon of Horus are necessarily at odds with each other.

(Evolution is "grandiose" as well in all fairness.) I dig what you wrote that the spheres, and neurocircuits, the anatomy are all he same thing.

Just as a personal note, which you or may not care about, I am ordered a used copy of The Cosmic Trigger.  Sure, I have read it before, but all my old books were sold, loaned out, or just lost.  Time to replenish my library, and for a refresher in Cosmic neuro-consciousness conductivity.


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Shiva
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

learning is a dangerous thing?

Yes. I often refer to the W for info. It is convenient ... therefore it must be watched closely. Of course you should look up new things. I was merely commenting on your over-zealous, repetitive referral to the W as you learned things.

Posted by: @toadstoolwe

As far as evolution is concerned, that is simply a matter of opinion.

Yes it is. Nobody has any proof regarding anything. This is where things become abstract, and belief systems arise. Then people sue each other or start wars over ideas.

 

 


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toadstoolwe
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@shiva I appreciate your comments, and and for the most agree.  On the subject of using Wikipedia is YES, I have read books, and Primary sources.  However I don't always have immediate access to them, and things like authorship, pagination, and quotes can be difficult to remember.  Wikipedia is just a super convenient way to spark my neurons into remembering a text, a verse or passage from Mr. Crowley's IMMENSE bibliography.  I also use Internet Archive, that has an almost unlimited catalogue of Books, Films, Magazines. It is on-line library par excellent.  They have an entire site devoted exclusively to Crowley's publications, online and FREE. 


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katrice
(@katrice)
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Topic starter  
Posted by: @michael-staley

ividual, and thus transient, I'm part of a continuum that stretches from the remote past to an indefinite future. We take a host of influences, transmuting them  through the catalyst of our magical and mystical experience into an innate body of work; this will in turn form one influence amongst many for others, who will do similarly. In this way a body of work is passed on, but in a dynamic, transformative, serpentine manner.

And in the process, we send ourselves in to the future, in a way. 


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David Dom Lemieux
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

@david-dom-lemieux Well, Yes and no.  Fossil evidence suggests the existence of an extinct species of apes known as Gigantopithecus blacki  which might serve as  a possible explanation for giants in myth and legend.  That's one idea, the other the rare genetic condition called Gigantism that affects humans.  So, in that respect, Yes giants exist, and have existed through the centuries.

Yes but not 20 feet tall as in Tolkien fantasy novels.

https://www.lashtal.com/wiki/Aleister_Crowley_Timeline


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toadstoolwe
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@david-dom-lemieux Yes, but that's why they are "Legends" not absolute fact.  I never meant to imply that the Giants of myth literally existed. (Insofar as I know)  Just that myths and legends often have real antecedents.  I am sure you are aware that giants are mentioned in the Book of Genesis  6:4  in summary, they mated with the daughters of men, and had long life-spans.  Make what you will from the passage


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David Dom Lemieux
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

@david-dom-lemieux Yes, but that's why they are "Legends" not absolute fact.  I never meant to imply that the Giants of myth literally existed. (Insofar as I know)  Just that myths and legends often have real antecedents.  I am sure you are aware that giants are mentioned in the Book of Genesis  6:4  in summary, they mated with the daughters of men, and had long life-spans.  Make what you will from the passage

How is that different to Jack and the Beanstalk?

https://www.lashtal.com/wiki/Aleister_Crowley_Timeline


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toadstoolwe
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@david-dom-lemieux Not much!


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katrice
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

 Just that myths and legends often have real antecedents.  

Bones claimed to be from "giants" were frequently misidentified animal bones.  Give the similarity of individual bones between mammalian species, it seems like an understandable error for people in ancient times to make.  

Even the so-called "giant" skeletons found in long ago Pennsylvania were only about 6 feet tall.  Giant for a time when people of European descent were shorter,but not really giant by today's standards. Reports of those skeletons being horned was an error, antlers were found near some of the remains. 

 


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Shiva
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Posted by: @toadstoolwe

they mated with the daughters of men, and had long life-spans.  Make what you will from the passage

Make of it? Good grief, you are speaking of our ancestors. There is only one conclusion: We are they!

Posted by: @david-dom-lemieux

How is that different to Jack and the Beanstalk?

It isn't. Jack was my ancestor. He had many off-springs, so he is probably you ancestor as well. The Giant is an ancestor of RTC and Fr Los 8=3.

Posted by: @toadstoolwe

[Different?] ... Not much!

Big difference. In Genesis, the action revolved around (sexual?) reproduction. In the Beany Tale, the action revolved around climbing and chopping. 


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toadstoolwe
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@shiva Maybe Jack and the Beanstalk is an allegory.  Jack (mankind) climbs the Giant bean stalk, (A giant DNA double helix) leading to the Asgard, the abode of Giants.  Jack steals the goose that laid the golden eggs.  (In Ancient Egypt the goose was called the great cackler, the begetter of all existence and the golden eggs, eternal wisdom of the ages).


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katrice
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Remember the topic?

 

So long ago this Dositheus guy gave us some stuff that helped shape Thelema, and so did that Dee guy too. 

What about some of those people who were also around before, during, and shortly after Crowley's time?  How about some of those people not directly connected to Thelema? Randolph, Gurdjieff, Bardon.  Or even Pierre Bernard?    I'd include Evola but we covered him in another thread a while ago. 

All of them influential in their own ways. 

 

 


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fraterihsan
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Jack And The Beanstalk as a mystical allegory is quite mindblowing because I haven't thought about that in that context before. 

"There is none that shall be cast down or lifted up: all is ever as it was." - Liber Legis 2:58
"To Me do ye reverence! to me come ye through tribulation of ordeal, which is bliss." - Liber Legis 3:62


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katrice
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Topic starter  
Posted by: @fraterihsan

Jack And The Beanstalk as a mystical allegory is quite mindblowing because I haven't thought about that in that context before. 

It's hinted at in Alan Moore's comic Promethea, in relation to the character Jack Faust, but not really expanded on. 


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David Dom Lemieux
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Posted by: @fraterihsan

Jack And The Beanstalk as a mystical allegory is quite mindblowing because I haven't thought about that in that context before. 

What?  

Haven't you read Book 4?  Any mindless tale can be interpreted as mystical allegory if you apply a little effort and have nothing better to do. 

https://www.lashtal.com/wiki/Aleister_Crowley_Timeline


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fraterihsan
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Posted by: @david-dom-lemieux
Posted by: @fraterihsan

Jack And The Beanstalk as a mystical allegory is quite mindblowing because I haven't thought about that in that context before. 

What?  

Haven't you read Book 4?  Any mindless tale can be interpreted as mystical allegory if you apply a little effort and have nothing better to do. 

Yes I've read Book 4 and yes I know the interlude you speak of. 

The Jack and the Beanstalk one is a little more exoterically (in that is very apparent in it's display of archetypal figures and motifs) alchemical, not very "out-there" and certainly not in the kabbalistic dot connecting vain of the humorous interpretation of Crowley in that interlude essay. 

It blowed my mind because it was mystical allegorical in a very apparent and not arcane sense. Not in the sense of trying to find any meaning in it but the meaning simply being there in the story and it's symbols. 

"There is none that shall be cast down or lifted up: all is ever as it was." - Liber Legis 2:58
"To Me do ye reverence! to me come ye through tribulation of ordeal, which is bliss." - Liber Legis 3:62


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katrice
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Referring to one of my inspirations for starting this thread.

 

AL 3:37-38 reference Mentu.

But depending on which era, Mentu could be his own deity, or Horus, or even Set, as Mentu's cult was absorbed in to both Horus's and Set's in different eras.  Egyptian deities were rarely static, and it was common for cults to mix, or even for deities to be combined with others, depending on the era. 

 

Also of note, Crowley thought that 3:38's second line may refer to the Stele of Jeu, an example of bringing past practices in to the present and carrying them in to the future.   


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gurugeorge
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Posted by: @shiva

This central core of our brain(s) is not even a lizard. A liz has four legs (limbs), and thus it has a limbric brain that surrounds its serpent core. 

Apropos that, check this out (also in relation to qi).  Make sure you have the sound on:-

https://www.facebook.com/jagannath.chatterjee/videos/453467736540210


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Shiva
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Posted by: @gurugeorge

check this out

Yeah, that's him it.


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