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Alan Moore's Bumper Book of Magic  

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wulfram
(@wulfram)
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03/03/2009 8:03 pm  

Article found here: http://www.wired.com/entertainment/hollywood/magazine/17-03/ff_moore_qa?currentPage=al l"> http://www.wired.com/entertainment/hollywood/magazine/17-03/ff_moore_qa?currentPage=all

And now an excerpt:

Wired: You mentioned Jerusalem and your music. Is there anything else I should know about?

Moore: There is the Bumper Book of Magic, which I am working on with my friend and inspiration Steve Moore—no relation. We are hoping that when we get it finished, in probably a couple of years, that it will be the most lucid, most beautiful, and probably most informative and funny grimoire that anybody has ever produced. It will be the first time a book of this nature, a huge compendium of magic which explains it in theory, in practice, which explains its history, and which includes all sorts of other wonderful features—it will be the first time this has ever been done for a mass market.

All of the previous magicians who've published grimoires have done it for an esoteric elite, and it's mainly been done in fairly opaque language that would only be comprehensible to people with already a fair amount of arcane knowledge. What we are trying to do is to make this, as I say, completely lucid, to demystify it, and at the same time to restore it to the position of reverence that we think that it should be in.

One of the things that has been the most fun is that part of the book, a strand that runs through the book, is a series of one-page features called "Old Moore's Lives of the Great Enchanters," where we start off with the dancing sorcerer: the cave illustration from Les Trois Freres caves in France, which is an antlered, dancing shaman figure. We take this as the first recorded magician. And we do a piece about the likelihood of Neolithic shamanism, and its world view. We move on through the Persian magi up through pretty much all of the important, famous magicians in history. We found out some incredible things just from researching these things. We were probably complacent because we assumed that we already knew about these things and these people. But we found out an incredible amount of new information.

We found out where kabbalah came from. It's not Hebrew at all, it's Pythagorean Greek. It was Pythagoras who first suggested adding three spheres to the classical seven spheres. He said, Yeah that's great, but you need another three spheres. You need one to represent the Earth, you need one to represent the six stars of the Zodiac, and one to represent the Primum Mobile—the first stirrings, or the origins of the universe, the Big Bang. It still obviously has a Hebrew element in its construction, but what happened is that the Pythagoreans had this system outlined, 10 spheres, each with their correspondencies. But this would have been translated into various languages, including Hebrew, in Alexandria around 100 BC to 100 AD. And there were scholars from all over the world passing through Alexandria. What must have happened is that Hebrew scholars picked up this Pythagorean stuff and realized they had a base counting system of 10, which would have made it appropriate to their mathematics, and that they could draw 22 lines between the 10 spheres, representing the 22 letters in the Hebrew alphabet. And they took it, and ran with it, and developed kabbalah as it is today. But the roots were originally Pythagorean.

We found out who Faust was. And how the rather muddled story of Dr. Faust the evil magician actually evolved. We're pretty pleased with ourselves. We've even found out that Dr. Dee's Enochian magic, which was the names of angels that were written backwards in an invented magical alphabet, that he was actually taking the idea from Paracelsus who had a magical alphabet with which he used to write the names of angels backwards. This is something neither one of us had ever read in any consideration of John Dee. So we're really excited.

We seem to be turning up something new with every new enchanter we look at. It's a very fun book to do. It will include a complete tarot deck that I shall be working on with Jose Villarrubia. The basic thinking behind the tarot deck is that, if it's not as good as the Aleister Crowley soft deck, then it's not really worth bothering with. That's the one to beat or to equal. There's not much point in doing one not as good as that. That's the level we're setting the bar at. We're hoping to have a fold-out kabbalah board game. The winner is basically the first one that reaches enlightenment, as long as they don't make a big thing of it. Also, Melinda [Gebbie, Moore's partner] will also be contributing a pop-up temple for today's modern magus on the move, a little portable shrine.

We want this thing to have a lot of really fun inserts, fun features. Something that would delight a child. We want to make this not only a perfectly lucid and accurate book about magic, but we really want to make it a book about magic that would not disappoint an 8-year-old child if they came across it. Back when I was a child and I first heard about magic, then I kind of knew instinctively what a book of magic would be. It would be unimaginably wonderful. It would have fantastic things in it. It would be much better than the children's comics annuals I got at Christmas, and they were pretty wonderful. That is very much what we've tried to achieve. We want this to be magic that will be accessible to intelligent, modern adults. And we also want it to be magic that 8-year-old children will recognize as magic, as being as beautiful and glorious and entertaining as they had always hoped that magic would turn out to would be.

There are other bits and pieces going on. I've just written an introduction for a new book of Austin Osman Spare's The Book of Pleasure, which I was very happy to do an introduction for. Those are the things that keep me busy. Those are the main three things.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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03/03/2009 11:57 pm  

Ahem - it's Aleister Crowley's Thoth deck, not 'soft' deck :shock:. Apart from that it all sounds very exciting. Now kids - don't forget to actually do some magick instead of just reading pop-up books about it.


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 Anonymous
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Posts: 0
04/03/2009 5:39 am  
"Lamogue" wrote:
Ahem - it's Aleister Crowley's Thoth deck, not 'soft' deck :shock:. Apart from that it all sounds very exciting. Now kids - don't forget to actually do some magick instead of just reading pop-up books about it.

That would be the fault of the person who transcribed the interview from the tape....interviewer or secretary, whoever. Despite every other film version of his books/comics being utterly dire (and the magus knows this without apparently having seen any of them....), I'm going to give Watchmen a go, it's here next week....


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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05/03/2009 2:57 am  

Alan Moore talks about his Bumper Book of Magic amongst many other things in this latest audio file.
Disinformation: The Podcast - The Mindscape of Alan Moore http://media.libsyn.com/media/disinfo/Disinformation_The_Podcast_-_The_Mindscape_of_Alan_Moore.MP3


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 Anonymous
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05/03/2009 3:35 am  

isn't that just the soundtrack to the film? have shadowsnake films given you permission to distribute it freely?


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 Anonymous
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Posts: 0
05/03/2009 7:51 pm  
"BlueKephra" wrote:
"Lamogue" wrote:
Ahem - it's Aleister Crowley's Thoth deck, not 'soft' deck :shock:. Apart from that it all sounds very exciting. Now kids - don't forget to actually do some magick instead of just reading pop-up books about it.

That would be the fault of the person who transcribed the interview from the tape....interviewer or secretary, whoever. Despite every other film version of his books/comics being utterly dire (and the magus knows this without apparently having seen any of them....), I'm going to give Watchmen a go, it's here next week....

You should give V for Vendetta a try as well. The only Moore film that is bad is LOEG. From Hell has the problem that too much was changed from the graphic novel so that it is only on the surface Moore's vision. LOEG suffered from the book not being done or possibly even started when it was optioned, same idea, different take kind of thing. V for Vendetta is excellent, even if it alters bits of the source material from Anarchy v. Fascism/Thatcherism to a condemnation and exploration of the extremes of Bush led Neocons. It is still exceptionally faithful in tone and intent and an excellent adaptation.

The Bumper book I have been looking forward to for years now since I first heard about it in 2002 or thereabouts. I didn't know they were also doing a tarot deck though. Most excellent.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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06/03/2009 5:29 am  

LOEG will long be up there with The Worst Films Ever Made. I believe this is partly due to Connery calling the shots and the director being too intimidated to argue. From Hell has no atmosphere and was a huge waste of an opportunity. I guess that when an author tells you his work ahould not be filmed, you should at least consider listening to him. I believe Moore is deaf in one ear and blind in one eye, so the lure of the CGI 5.1 surround sound extravaganza will be somewhat reduced for him.


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dvd464
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08/03/2009 8:47 am  

Hi LAShTAL. You are the one of the best forums that I have found on the web. I love Alan Moore’s art and all his books. It happens that I work in a print shop and more than three years ago I copied a picture of the angel from The Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre of Marvels CD covers onto poster material. It came out really good so I hang it above my desk. And then a little while later when I am at work I feel raindrops on my head. This is inside my apartment and it rains on me! The fact that this really happens kind of freaks me out. In fact I felt a need to tell all my friends about it. Enough to say it was truly a weird moment. Since then I have rationalised that what happened maybe was due to a hole in my ceiling and or some leak in the water system or freaky condensation. But look at the poster now? What a weird result. The angel displays clear signs of stigmata. The symmetry is perfect! The straight lines down at the bottom are suggestive of writing. Reminds me a bit of Hebrew or Arabic or cuneiform but I cannot decipher the alphabet. It was positively a genuine mystical experience and more so because the tears of the angel fell and hit two of my grimoires. In my mind I am quietly amazed. I just thought I share these images of the angel with you.

Love/Lucius Y King

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kinglucius/?saved=1


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the_real_simon_iff
(@the_real_simon_iff)
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09/03/2009 7:47 am  

93!

I could imagine that Alan Moore fans will love the WATCHMEN movie. I thought it was really close and faithful to the original comics, maybe even the best adaptation to date, although of course Mr. Moore once again refuses to occur anywhere in the credits and it is even alleged that he has put a curse on the film. Anyway, I thought it was very nice to watch, but I am looking much more forward to his book on magic...or next graphic novels.

Love=Law
Lutz


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dvd464
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Joined: 12 years ago
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10/03/2009 8:08 am  

Hello LAShTAL. Is in it nice to take a break from the heavy debate over on Erwin’s (which in my mind he won by the third or fourth page!) thread and to anticipate the release of this comic book full of magic? I too look forward to see the Watchmen movie. That book led me to Alan Moore and in turn led me to Aleister Crowley which is why I am here on the forums everyday. Also maybe relevant to this site is at the time of the above apparition, I was in the middle of a Tarot reading. I keep a magical diary. It was the Adjustment card from the Book of Thoth (I agree with the many that think it is the great Beast’s best work, and funniest!) that brought on the deluge of water from the heavens (ceiling). Did anyone else but me dream of that piece of choice land by Loch Ness last night? Consider it bought!?

Love/Lucius Y King


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lashtal
(@lashtal)
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10/03/2009 3:01 pm  

I watched the movie with my son on Friday. Rather impressive, IMHO.

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
10/03/2009 7:47 pm  
"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
93!

I could imagine that Alan Moore fans will love the WATCHMEN movie. I thought it was really close and faithful to the original comics, maybe even the best adaptation to date, although of course Mr. Moore once again refuses to occur anywhere in the credits and it is even alleged that he has put a curse on the film. Anyway, I thought it was very nice to watch, but I am looking much more forward to his book on magic...or next graphic novels.

Love=Law
Lutz

You got to be shitting me right, the movie was horribly paced, the dialogue was raped, the ending was different from the graphic novel, and all the poetic beauty of the story went down the drain w/ the Black Freighter.

And the Watchmaker scene was dumbed down for idiotic Americans that have a hard time thinking outside of the Linear Time Paradigm.

I suggest rereading the Watchmen, so you'll understand how piss-poor the film adaption is and further more let us hope Alan never watches it or he might bludgeon the director to death with his own shoes.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
16/03/2009 3:24 pm  

On The Guardian website today Mr Moore does a quick interview:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2009/mar/16/alan-moore-watchmen-lost-girls


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lashtal
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16/03/2009 3:59 pm  
"Neither-Neither" wrote:
You got to be shitting me right... you'll understand how piss-poor the film adaption is and further more let us hope Alan never watches it or he might bludgeon the director to death with his own shoes.

I'm sensing at least mild disapproval.

😉

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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the_real_simon_iff
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16/03/2009 4:11 pm  
"lashtal" wrote:
I'm sensing at least mild disapproval.

Me too...

I still think it is the best adpatation so far, with all the chinks an adaptation naturally has. As the new numbers from the US show, the watchmaker sequence was not even remotely dumped down enough, personally I thought it was the weakest part in the book also. The pace of the film is a pretty subjective thing, I liked it, because it seemed so un-film-ish and made some other guests clearly uncomfortable ("Where is the next effect sequence? Enough talking!"). Okay, the ending was different, but not too bad, and Rohrschach's Rohrschach-marks in the snow have been a nice idea. As I am usually highly disappointed by comic-adaptations-to-film, I had much more fun seeing this one. Of course, if you consider Alan Moore a god, it was pure blasphemy....

Love=Law
Lutz


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Walterfive
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16/03/2009 8:35 pm  

I saw it in IMAX. Mind-boggling special effects, and a script that stayed true to the spirit (if not the letter) of the original film. Even though it seems like every third comment I hear or read about the film involves the Big Blue Penis, the other two comments are filled with praise for the film, it's production values, and filming techniques. MUCH better than "The Spirit" or "Sin City", which it neccesarily resembled, it reaching somewhat for a film noir sort of feel, I thought.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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19/03/2009 5:42 pm  

Also look out for Mr. Moore's new 'Leaugue of Extraordinary gentlemen, vol.3' that will be available next month.
Some interesting stuff will be going on here.
Willam Hope Hodgson's character 'Carnacki, the ghost finder', is plaqued by visions of a shadowy occult order who are attempting to create something called a moonchild, while on London's dockside the most notorious serial murderer of the previous century has returned to carry on his grisly trade.


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dvd464
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23/03/2009 9:28 am  

Hi. I have not seen The Watchmen yet but I have read one thing. A contemporary of Crowley was the French Egyptist and Occultist with the given name of René Aor Schwaller de Lubicz who was a member of a group called Les Veilleurs. Apparently there is photograph of them which includes Rudolf Hess (a foe, a fake, or a fundraiser?) and they were metal heavily into alchemy. And now it is believed that they experimented with super secrets like the very nature of different atoms and the similarities between them. Is this as speculative as if Crowley was an undercover agent in these hermetic circles?

Love/Lyk


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Walterfive
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23/03/2009 12:06 pm  

Vol. 3???

"The Black Dossier" wasn't Vol. 3???


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dvd464
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31/03/2009 3:20 pm  

Hi Everyone. I finally got to see the Watchmen film. It was great, one of the best films based on Alan Moore’s books to date. It was such a comfort to see so many of the images were kept true to the comic. They just had to change the end to something more realistic and less artistic. But if they had kept everything in, it would have been a reel twelve months long. I experienced a synchronicity when Ozymiandi’s Karnak was mentioned in the brief period of time when I remember other references to the same place, like OKontrair’s clue on the ‘Egyptian Assistance’ thread where the mound of Maat was found and then there is Shelley ‘King of Kings am I, Osymandias. If anyone would know how great I am and where I lie, let him surpass one of my works.” And then there is the comic, ‘Through mediation and intellectual exercise, we may come to use our minds in ways that we never thought possible. [..] We will discuss lateral thinking, Zen meditation, and the power of dreaming and the subconscious, along with other useful techniques for the advancement of the mind and intellect. Though not a religion, there are powerful spiritual disciplines behind the Veidt Method that must be understood if the student is to proceed’. This is from the desk of Alan Moore. From the Magical diary of O.M. ’12.10. I have ordered 12 oysters and coffee and bread and butter. O oysters! Be thee unto me strength that I formulate the 12 rays of the crown of HVA! I conjure thee and very potently command. Even by him who ruleth Life from the Throne of Tahuti unto the Abyss of Amennti, even by Amoun the giver of Life, and by Khem the mightly, whose Phallus is like the Pillar in Karnak! Even by myself and male power do I conjure thee. Amen’.
Good night.

Love/Lyk


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Horemakhet
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15/12/2009 11:25 am  

... I am a big fan of Alan Moore, & have read everything that I can get my hands on, including all online interviews. Apparently, Alan will only release the Tarot deck accompanying the book if he knows that it is on par with the Thoth deck. - This is a challenge that I will love to see the results of! The rest of the 'book' sounds brilliant: They have designed it as for a child, with an infinite fascination. Indeed, Alan Moore has entered his 'October' year as a writer. Many good things to come from his pen....


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