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 Anonymous
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10/09/2008 1:21 pm  

Hi all, 93

This is partly in response to the Regardie thread - I know that Regardie made friends with Dion Fortune, who referred to him as being her EQUAL (I don't recall the exact words) and this alone IMO proves how superior Crowley was to Fortune - try explaining that to members of SIL/SOL!

However my specific question was that somebody once told me Dion Fortune had written letters to Crowley asking for his magickal advice and acknowledging him to be a great master. I was wondering if anyone else could verify this or had any additional info.

93 93/93

nick


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 Anonymous
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10/09/2008 1:56 pm  

I recall James Eshelman making the same comments on heruraha.net, of Dion Fortune holding Crowley in high regards. However, this was in private at the time and not something she was public about because of "image".


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 Anonymous
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10/09/2008 7:44 pm  

First, how does Fortune holding Doc as her equal equate to Crowley being superior? Secondly, yes, she was corresponding with Crowley and waiting for a day when she might be able to publicly express her support of him and his work.


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 Anonymous
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11/09/2008 12:45 pm  

Well I have nothing against Regardie, but could you imagine CROWLEY holding him to be his magickal equal? It sounds preposterous. Just my opinion of course.

93
nick


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 Anonymous
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11/09/2008 2:37 pm  
"hamsolo" wrote:
...could you imagine CROWLEY holding him to be his magickal equal? It sounds preposterous.

First we have the concept that "all men are created equal." Admittedly an American concept, but worth considering.
Secondly, we have the spiritual concept of the "advanced" practitioner being "humble" and recognizing (through their direct perception of the facts as presented by the universe) that they are less than others.
Imagine CROWLEY holding [anyone] as his equal? Ha!


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 Anonymous
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11/09/2008 2:59 pm  

Kenneth Grant was present on two occasions when Fortune visited Crowley. He mentions it in a couple of books, the most detailed being in "Quest for Dion Fortune" by Janine Chapman, Weiser 1993. Grant missed most of one conversation as he was busy doing some task Crowley had set him, but he was present when they were discussing the sacrifice of a black cock or something like that (I don't have the book in front of me, so am writing from memory). Crowley claimed that he and Fortune had a "secret understanding" and that she acknowledged his authority.


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alysa
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11/09/2008 3:16 pm  

On the contrary, having read John Symonds "The King of the Shadow Realm" and Regardies own "The Eye in the Triangle", it showed to me itself enormously cleer that Crowley looked enormously down upon Regardie, even from day one in Paris. Crowley also thought very little upon Regardies writing on the Qabalah "The Tree of Life". It probably also was Crowley who made the nasty writing concerning one "Israel Reguydy" that for many years had its bad effests upon the life of Israel Regardie. Till now I always was unable to find a writing that showed itself the obvious contrary to what I wrote here.


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 Anonymous
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11/09/2008 11:21 pm  

I don't think anyone was questioning that Crowley held Regardie in low esteem.


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 Anonymous
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12/09/2008 12:23 pm  
"Nataraj418" wrote:
First we have the concept that "all men are created equal." Admittedly an American concept, but worth considering.

Let's be real - all men are NOT created equal. We all have different abilities. Some are great at doing certain things. Others are not. I think most of us here agree that Crowley was a great magician.


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 Anonymous
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12/09/2008 4:07 pm  
"hamsolo" wrote:
"Nataraj418" wrote:
First we have the concept that "all men are created equal." Admittedly an American concept, but worth considering.

Let's be real - all men are NOT created equal. We all have different abilities. Some are great at doing certain things. Others are not. I think most of us here agree that Crowley was a great magician.

'Each one is unique' is better suited to "being real," certainly, and any idea to the contrary causes nothing but trouble, here in America and elsewhere.

As for Crowley, he was a genius and he knew it; a quality that I would hesitate in ascribing to either Regardie or Fortune, not that they were without merit.


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alysa
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12/09/2008 5:27 pm  

Uranus, you are right, I also didn't thought that, but I certainly didn't want to waste any great words or capitals on the idea that Crowley would have holded Regardie as his magickal equel. Hamsolo, I am real, I think people are not created as equals, we certainly all have our own particular abilities, as to my opinion I hold the thought now for more than twenty years that Crowley was a great magician. Nataraj, I also think "all of us are equal" is'nt a Thelemic thought. Camlion, I wish to add that " each one is unique", might be a better term to use. I also think that Fortune and Regardie had their merits.


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sonofthestar
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13/09/2008 6:56 pm  

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

If one reads the foreword to the book, The Mystical Qabalah--she, Miss Fortune,
writes: "As I have frequently referred to the authority of MacGregor Mathers and Aleister Crowley in matters of Qabalistic mysticism, it may be as well to explain my position in relation to these two writers."

She then goes on to say that she never knew either of those two gentlemen, etc.
I cannot say when The Mystical Qabalah was published, as mine has no date in it.
Later in the book, she disagrees with certain Chakra attributions as defined by AC.

I somewhere recollect, that in another of her books, she refers to AC as The Master Therion, or Therion--in reference to something or other. I cannot say for a fact that this is so, though I am almost certain of it. I do seem to recall it to be a positive sort of reference, and no thing at all negative. I will continue to look through what books I have by her for the precise words, if someone does not find it first.

All in all, she did indeed recognize him to be her superior concerning such things, and if she did not agree with his take on things, she did present his view to her readers (in The Mystical Qabalah).

Most of her "followers" I think, did, and do not recognize any such authority of his as she did, or would begrudgingly admit to it.

I've always enjoyed her books, especially her works of fiction based upon things "occult".
A likable Lady indeed!
Tried to contact her a while back on the astral, and oddly enough, the very next day the headlines for the paper read: Dame fortune frowns on New Orleans!

Love is the law, love under will.


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 Anonymous
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13/09/2008 11:46 pm  

The Mystical Qabalah was originally serialized in the Occult Review I believe and then collected for the book. This was in 1936 I believe as well.


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 Anonymous
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16/09/2008 1:24 pm  
"sonofthestar@Gmail.com" wrote:
I somewhere recollect, that in another of her books, she refers to AC as The Master Therion, or Therion

Yes she also has a story (don't recall which one) in which a man teaches himself magick after finding a book by "somebody who spells magic with a "k" at the end".

On the SOL website, Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki has a huge "recommended reading" list by which contains nothing whatsoever by Crowley, but includes just about everything by herself, Dion Fortune and W.E.Butler.
http://www.servantsofthelight.org/knowledge/reading-nonfiction.html


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sonofthestar
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16/09/2008 3:44 pm  

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Hello Hamsolo!

In a field rife with self aggrandizement (not always a bad thing)--Miss Fortune had no problems giving people credit where credit was due.

From the same book, The Mystical Qabalah:

"In these pages it is the system given by Crowley of which I shall avail myself to supplement the points upon which MacGregor Mathers, Wynn Westcott, and A. E. Waite, the principal modern authorities upon the Qabalah, are silent."

Concerning Crowley's work developed as 777, of corresponding and attributing many of the Gods, Angels, Animals, etc in their relation to the Tree, she writes:

"This has been done tentatively by Crowley, and is, I fancy, original work and not derived from Mathers. Its implications are not altogether clear to me, and I doubt if I could subscribe to all of them. An immensely wide range of scholarship is necessary for the satisfactory accomplishment of this branch, a range of scholarship which I do not possess."

This woman certainly does not lack for integrity.
Nor was she to be swayed by the vilification of AC, and would not back down or cower in her obvious (though not trumpet blaring) support for him.
Alan Richardson, the writer of the book, The Magical Life of Dion Fortune Priestess of the 20th Century, seems to have a problem with this support of hers for AC, in that he has to take a personal swipe at Therion ever so often, yet not go so far as he would like to, due to that very apparent acknowledging support of Violet Firth (Dion Fortune) for Therion.
Despite Richardson's noticeable wrestling with his problem--that the subject of his book had no real problems with AC, --it's still a great book worth reading.

Love is the law, love under will.


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 Anonymous
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16/09/2008 3:46 pm  
"hamsolo" wrote:
Let's be real - all men are NOT created equal. We all have different abilities. Some are great at doing certain things. Others are not. I think most of us here agree that Crowley was a great magician.

Yes, of course all men are unequal. The term "all men are created equal" is an American concept that should include the suffix, "under the Law!" (And even that is democratic, wishful thinking - The last time I looked I saw that the mundane Halls of Justice were leaning towards those who had more bucks in the bank).

I suggested this Equality as a "consideration," but placed my hopes too high and failed to cite the level of consciousness involved. That is to say, when one is in an elevated state of consciousness, there is no difference among things and (even) people. The retarded sorcerer is seen as equal to the mighty adept. Not equal in terms of ability, but equal in terms of having a place in the scheme of things and deserving of equal respect.

So if Crowley "looked down" or "despised" or "felt superior" to Fortune or Regardie, then he simply wasn't operating (at that moment of condescension) in this posited, elevated, higher level of consciousness.

Yes, we probably all (well, most - as you say) agree that Crowley was a great magician. It has been written that there were only two people who ever escaped from his denunciatory attacks: Alan Bennett and Oscar Eckenstein (surely, there must have been others, but I don't know who they might be). So if he felt the need to grind down everyone else, what does that tell us about his everyday level of consciousness. One only has to read the Crowley communications in Martin Starr's "The Unknown God" to see where his (AC's) personality was in ordinary circumstances.


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 Anonymous
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17/09/2008 11:17 am  

Hi.
The bit about 'volumes on Magic spelt with a K' is in her novel "The Goat Foot God"
Dion Fortune considered "Magick in theory and Practice" an important work. In her periodical 'The Inner Light' of March 1933, in the 'Inner Light book service' under special offers, she has this to say;

'Magick' by 'The Master Therion', ( Aleister Crowley ) privately published on the Continent in four volumes at two guineas we can offer at 15/-. This is the most important occult publication of the century, and in it is reprinted the author's famous '777' a set of tables of magical correspondences of all systems. This alone commands at least two guineas on the second-hand market and only turns up at rare intervals. Like all this author's works, 'Magick' will go to a high price when the edition is exhausted. and those who wish to obtain a copy should loose no time in doing so.

Nick.


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 Anonymous
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17/09/2008 12:43 pm  

Thanks everyone for this great info. I did not realise how publicly pro-Crowley Dion Fortune actually was.

It is also significant that Gareth Knight, in his "practical guide to qabalistic symbolism", proclaims that Crowley was right about switching the Tarot cards The Emperor and the Star. Which suggests this may have been, at least at one time, adopted by SIL (any SIL members here..?)


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 Anonymous
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01/12/2008 2:40 am  
"Alastrum" wrote:
Crowley claimed that he and Fortune had a "secret understanding"

I'm inclined to agree.


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 Anonymous
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24/12/2008 9:31 pm  

Fortune repeatedly acknowledged Crowley and praised him with some specific reservations.

I don't quite understand the point of this thread unless it is merely "My guru is better than your guru" which means little insofar in relation to any individual reading or posting to this thread.

Dion Fortune has a lot of valuable material worth considering, it is not an either/or proposition, you can read Fortune AND Crowley unless you are just lazy or too intellectually weak to sort things out for yourself.

Ps. Crowley was also not the first person to spell Magic with a k, albeit he was the first to do so intentionally for symbolic reasons. The "J.F." English translation of Agrippa consistently spells magic with a k, before English spelling was standardized.


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alysa
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24/12/2008 10:20 pm  

Welcome back Poelzig, missed you very profoundly on this site, hope to see in the future more interesting threads of you, as to the spelling of words like magick, musick, and so on people used to write in that way before and still probably in the time of Shakespeare, after the time of Shakespeare they standardized the language English as in the way it now is, and it luckily stayed in that way. If they not always should try to change a language than it is for a formal non-user of that language much easyer to learn. Sorry to add my frustration on this thread but where I live they try to change the spelling rules every two or three years.


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 Anonymous
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28/12/2008 12:22 am  

93 folks!

Some more info on the Fortune/Crowley business, taken from Gareth Knights "Dion Fortune & The Inner Light". According to this biography, Knight states that Kenneth Grant, when relating the event of the meeting between Crowley and Fortune to Alan Richardson thirty years later, stated that he still remembered the sparkle in her eye when countering Crowley quip for quip, and that she accidentally dropped a brooch shaped in the design of two wyvern creatures supporting a green stone. Crowley remarked that ten years before he would have consecrated it for her, to which she replied that ten years before she would have done it herself.

Still to read the Alan Richardson one but the above by Gareth Knight aint too bad a read if its still available.


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 Anonymous
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30/12/2008 10:00 pm  
"hamsolo" wrote:
On the SOL website, Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki has a huge "recommended reading" list by which contains nothing whatsoever by Crowley, but includes just about everything by herself, Dion Fortune and W.E.Butler.
http://www.servantsofthelight.org/knowledge/reading-nonfiction.html

I can't help but comment on this many months later. LOL. It should be noted that MANY authors on the occult and occult orders leave off Crowley in their reading lists and judging by the magic of the SOL, leaving Crowley off the list is a great idea because while it is still rooted in Golden Dawn style systems, the overall package is as different as can be. To add Crowley into the suggested reading list would serve only to confuse those who might be interested in the system of the SOL. The SOL isn't the continuation of Fortune's work, it is inspired by her work. Fortune's order still functions to this day. The SOL is more like the Fraternitas LVX Occulta when compared to the Builders of the Adytum. BOTA is a very important element of thier teachings but they have added other material and their own take on the material.


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Nomad
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17/01/2009 2:35 am  

I haven't got the book at hand, but I read the excellent Crowley bio "Do What Thou Wilt" by Laurence Sutin once. In the very last chapter he talks about how Fortune became particularly close to Crowley as a friend and confidante at the end of his life. Sutin even quotes some of their personal correspondence, which makes clear that Fortune had immense regard for the Old Man and his mission. She wrote him that she would have liked very much to promote his New Aeon ideas within her own occult school, but that she knew in her heart it was too soon for most of her students to "get it" (my words, not hers! - I don't have the piece here to quote from), and that there would be a Blitzkrieg-esque result within her student community if she started encouraging them to read Liber AL... It certainly puts pay to thesorts of myths that many of her followers still promote - that she thought Crowley was a bad egg and had fallen into the Abyss etc.


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 Anonymous
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31/10/2009 11:23 am  
"Nataraj418" wrote:
"hamsolo" wrote:
...could you imagine CROWLEY holding him to be his magickal equal? It sounds preposterous.

First we have the concept that "all men are created equal." Admittedly an American concept, but worth considering.
Secondly, we have the spiritual concept of the "advanced" practitioner being "humble" and recognizing (through their direct perception of the facts as presented by the universe) that they are less than others.
Imagine CROWLEY holding [anyone] as his equal? Ha!

Every man and every woman is a star. It doesnt say anything about them being equal!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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 Anonymous
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31/10/2009 11:26 am  
"uranus" wrote:
"hamsolo" wrote:
On the SOL website, Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki has a huge "recommended reading" list by which contains nothing whatsoever by Crowley, but includes just about everything by herself, Dion Fortune and W.E.Butler.
http://www.servantsofthelight.org/knowledge/reading-nonfiction.html

I can't help but comment on this many months later. LOL. It should be noted that MANY authors on the occult and occult orders leave off Crowley in their reading lists and judging by the magic of the SOL, leaving Crowley off the list is a great idea because while it is still rooted in Golden Dawn style systems, the overall package is as different as can be. To add Crowley into the suggested reading list would serve only to confuse those who might be interested in the system of the SOL. The SOL isn't the continuation of Fortune's work, it is inspired by her work. Fortune's order still functions to this day. The SOL is more like the Fraternitas LVX Occulta when compared to the Builders of the Adytum. BOTA is a very important element of thier teachings but they have added other material and their own take on the material.

SOL also teach different attributions of the magical tools. The use the wand for air and the dagger for fire if I recall. I take it their tarot must also reflect this. A SOL member once told me that these are the correct attributes and the ones given by the Golden Dawn are blinds.


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 Anonymous
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31/10/2009 2:27 pm  

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

I'm not anti them of anything but didn't SOL do a mass exorcism of the spirit of Dion Fortune some time ago. This whole thread reminds me of Gardnerian Wicca after Gerald Gardner passed on and Dorien Valiente rewriting the Book Of Shadows with all the Liber AL bits taken out. It seems that in most of the New Aeon traditions that owe a large amount of their exsitence to Thelema or at least Thelemic thought, when the magickal leader dies any links that leader had with Crowley are burried very deep.
For example people seem to forget that Austin Spare, Gerald Gardner, Sri Dadaji were all fully fledged Thelemites. It's those who are trying to inherit their mantle that seem to insist they weren't nowadays, as some sort of historical denial. Perhaps this says more about the blind egos of these people than it does the traditions of the teachers who founded their schools.
At the time, Crowley represented the only other surviving tradition from The Hermetic Order Of The Golden Dawn to Dion Fortune. She would have to be completely moronic to pretend he didn't have some credence or somehow her system was totally different. To her credit she obviously didn't but those since her have tried to erase this embarassment from their history, even going to the extent of denying her take on Crowley now it seems.
There is very little in the Modern Pagan Magickal Revival that isn't based on Thelema. Perhaps this is Thelema is the Broad Temple sense though but as an anti-dogma Thelemite that is the only one there is for me. As someone who is dear to me and a strong student of Dion Fortune's work pointed out to me recently, this is all about politics and nothing whatsoever to do with magick and the spiritual problems of today's world as they are presented to us.
I think if only we could get rid of all these ridiculous impotent magickal orders, we might realise that we are all working arround the same ideas and principles. People still insist on being messianic and hijacking it all for their own beneifit though.

Love is the law, love under will.

Alex


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Palamedes
(@palamedes)
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31/10/2009 4:23 pm  
"Alex_Bennett" wrote:
For example people seem to forget that Austin Spare, Gerald Gardner, Sri Dadaji were all fully fledged Thelemites.

Alex, I think this is a sweeping statement that can hardly stand on its own without some qualifications. As we all know, Spare was very shortly a member of A.'.A.'. who mostly disliked Crowley and as far as I know never identified himself as a Thelemite, Gardner was for a while a ember of the O.T.O., without that much involvement, and Dadaji knew and respected Crowley (with some reservations: he for example claimed that Crowley confirmed to him that he - Crowley - has lost touch with Aiwass). But more importantly, if a label is in place, I think that Spare was a follower of The Cult of One, that Gardner was a Witch, and Dadaji a Nath.

On the other hand, and that's why I mentioned a need to qualify above, if you take that a Thelemite means a person who is doing his or her Will, than sure, that could be applied to those three individuals. But, in that sense it could be applied to so many other people also, to the point that the term looses its meaning due to the lack of a specific import.

But perhaps you had something entirely different in mind.


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alysa
(@alysa)
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31/10/2009 10:42 pm  

Austin Osman Spare, Gerald Gardner, can't say anything of worth about Sri Dadaji, might have been one time in their live 'very fledged' Thelemites, they were not that anymore later in their live, certainly not in the sense as Crowley would have seen it, though there always might have been an influence in their lives. Though when a person just happens to do his or her will, the term 'Thelemite' seems to be a little to confusely used to me.


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 Anonymous
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01/11/2009 4:13 pm  

Of course, many ideas that can be traced back to Crowley or Thelema have already influenced so many individuals of various degrees of prominence. Alex could have easily thrown in Hubbard and certainly Leary and then through Leary certain pioneers of the very technology that we are communicating with at this moment, and so on, and so on. The tentacles of influence, though still very young, already go every which way.

But I think Alex's real point is to picture an expansive Thelemic culture developed to a point where he can then rebel against it, break away from it and formulate an LHP of it; a degree of development that usually requires much more time to pass. But, that's another thread. 😉


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 Anonymous
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12/09/2011 9:37 pm  

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law

I am suprised to see that this thread does not cite the book by Alan Richardson on the relationship between Crowley and Fortune entitled 'Aleister Crowley and Dion Fortune: The Logos of the Aeon and the Shankti of the Age'.

Despite being published by Llewellyn (who are more miss than hit) I have found this to be a most wonderful book that begins at their deaths and works backwards through their parallel biographies. He frames this in the light of a text written by Crowley in 1911 called Liber Thisarb on the backwards review (first I've heard of it.
In this backwards review Richardson explores the relationship between Crowley and Fortune, their exchanged letters, and their mutual ideas throughout their careers. It shows that Crowley and Fortune weren't so different after all, both working towards liberation (in their own ways), both deeply involved with the question of sex magick, both involved in the war effort, and both adepts of the Western tradition. He even presents correspondence between Fortune and Crowley that implied that both she, and other members of her Fraternity of Inner Light were quite accepting of the law of Thelema, and in showing that she was issued the equinoctal password, that she may even have been initiates of the A.'.A.'.
This is a very different image of Fortune than one might glean from some of the more puritanical literature surrounding her, as well as the attitudes of some of her followers, but in essence it does not change who Dion Fortune was. This book was written by someone who is certainly more Fortune than Crowley, but in an open willingness to explore these two individuals and their interactions and individual missions brings a deeper appreciation of both.
Many sources are given from correspondence which givces an uniquivical image of Fortune as very warm to Thelema, albeit in her own ways in accordance with her own will.
I highly recommend this work, especially to those with an interest in Dion Fortune in the Thelemic community. The pure image of Fortune as a master of light, and the image of Crowley as the wickedest man in the world gives way to a synthesis and complementary symbiosis in the work of these two great initiates, bringing new vistas of exploration in the Western tradition.

Has anyone else on the forum read this, and if so, what do you think of the thesis?

Love is the law, love under will


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empiricus
(@empiricus)
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12/09/2011 9:58 pm  

93,

To be fair to those who posted before you on this thread, the book you refer to wasn't published until December 1st 2009.

All the best

93, 93/93.


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 Anonymous
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12/09/2011 11:27 pm  

93 to all participants

In her book "Psychic Self-Defense", Dion Fortune describes a mesmerizing yet totally disagreeable contact she had with a female employer, whom she calls "Auntie" or "Warden". She claims that this specific person hypnotized her and created quite the uncomfortable feelings of restriction, numbness and panic, in order to bind her Will.

Ive also read that out of resentment, Dion Fortune created in turn (unwillingly) a Fenrir thought-form one night, and that she got scared so much, that she immediately asked for Aleister Crowley's help and protection. He suggested that she should make an effort to forgive the deeds of her former mistress, in order to weaken the wolf, and afterwards to devour it, which indeed happened. Of course, in the aforementioned book (p. 40), Dion Fortune claims that, out of her own initiative, she absorbed methodically the silver cord which linked her solar plexus with the ectoplasm, until it finally vanished.

In Aleister Crowley's "Moonchild", there is a slightly similar incident, in Chapter 5, where a Thing in wolf form threatens Lisa in the garden, and Simon Iff absorbs it, by reciting the Law and maintaining a somewhat forgetful, even kind and tender attitude towards the Thing (p.p. 70-71).

So I was wondering whether there was indeed a secret understanding and connection between them.

As for the second part: a long discussion. Men are not equal. Well, at least, in the modern meaning of the word "equal". They offer equally to the Cosmos and they most certainly should have equal chances and quality of life, but their abilities and potential are not one and the same. Distinction should be made - not everyone is fit for any kind of operation, to my opinion. This kind of arrangement usually leads to large scale disaster. On the other hand, this shouldn't also lead a) to prejudice, oppression and injustice, b) to sentimental mush, mass democracy and melting pots of the worst kind. Each and every existence is precious and unique, and should be accepted as is, according to specific potential, talents and abilities, but levelling is a dangerous game... and shouldn't be played with easiness...

93 93/93


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Shiva
(@shiva)
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12/09/2011 11:34 pm  
"empiricus" wrote:
...the book you refer to wasn't published until December 1st 2009.

I was about to say, "Why should you be surprised"? - [even if it was published in 1950 or 1960]. This surprise suggests (to me) that the poster feels Lashtalians missed something. So what, and why should that cause surprise? Besides, the omission leaves the door open for the poster to make a post, which is interesting.

But then, I didn't need to say that because you came up with the publication date. I am surprised that the poster didn't notice this "kink in time."

I have neither read the book nor seen the date, so I really don't count. but Dion published a book or two that really stood high on their own merits, and added a bit of knowledge that AC seemed to have overlooked, or omitted, or didn't care about.


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 Anonymous
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13/09/2011 12:37 am  

93

Indeed, perhaps I have stumbled across something new to the Lashtalians.

As for the work of Dion Fortune, I am increasingly impressed by the materials released from the vaults of SIL under the editorship of Gareth Knight. Such titles as The Circuit Of Force (essentially a work on sex magick), Spiritualism and Occultism, Principles Of Esoteric Healing, and Principles Of Hermetic Philosophy.

I am always skeptical of the claim that Fortune was a lesser occultist because she was quiet in her pursuits, had the humility to recognise her shortcomings and weaknesses, and was willing and able to ask for help... I think in terms of self knowledge and causing change in accordance with will Dion Fortune was an envyable magician.

93/93


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 Anonymous
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13/09/2011 5:23 am  

"We hold this truth to be self-evident: that all men and women are created unequal: and our justice wills that this prejudice of nature be redressed, so far as is possible to human effort, by assuring to each and every one of them equality of rights before the law... and by assuring each and every one of them freedom to develop the powers of the soul; spiritual, mental, moral or physical without interference from any person or persons, so far as that development may prove compatible to the rights of others."
-Aleister Crowley


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alysa
(@alysa)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 648
13/09/2011 5:42 am  

Docetumbra, the book "Aleister Crowley and Dion Fortune : The Logos of the Aeon and the Shakti of the Age" was announced here on Lashtal at 21 of May 2009 and I bought and read it, on where it was announded I made a review on it, I also wish to state very much that I hold Dion Fortune in very high esteem, I in no way see her as a 'lesser occultist'!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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14/09/2011 7:48 am  

93,

I have read the book "Aleister Crowley and Dion Fortune..." and I agree with what docetumbra has written: a very interesting book that shows
- that the two were closer than one would think
- that they strived for the same goals, only from different angles
- that Dion Fortune, despite often being described as a kind of saint in literature, was (very much like Aleister Crowley) a human being subject to doubt, pain, failure and all the other ingredients of existence on the material plane.

I wonder how the two of them would have performed as priest and priestess in a Work of Art.

93 93/93

Eilthireach


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Shiva
(@shiva)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 4080
20/09/2011 3:52 pm  

In "Remembering Aleister Crowley," Kenneth Grant tells us:

"My preoccupation with his writings left me with with little time for - or interest in - anything else. So I hardly noticed such visitors as Frieda Harris or Dion Fortune. She had sent him a copy of her novel Sea Priestess in June 1944. On March 14th 1945 she had written to him:
"The acknowledgement I made in the introduction to The Mystical Qabalah of my indebtedness to your work, which seemed to me no more than common literary honesty, has been used as a rod for my back by people who look on you as Antichrist. I am prepared to dig in my toes and stand up to trouble if I have got to, but I don't take on a fight if I can help it nowadays because it wastes too much time.
"I am fully aware that there will come a time when I shall have to come out into the open and say: this is the law of the New Aeon, but I want to pick my time for that, because I propose to be in a strong strategic position when I do so, and if you give Mrs. Grundy advance information, I may not be properly entrenched when the inevitable blitz starts. Therefore I ask you not to mention my name for the present. I am at work on a book on the paths..."

On March 19th, 1946, Crowley wrote to Louis Wilkinson: "...Dion Fortune is dead There was a very secret understanding, by which she acknowledged my authority..."

- Kenneth Grant


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Markus
(@markus)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 248
20/09/2011 7:36 pm  
"Dion Fortune" wrote:
I am at work on a book on the paths..."

Has any of this work ever been published? Her book on the Qabalah is fantastic, and I'd love to read her work on the paths.

Markus


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