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Fernando Pessoa


Frater_HPK
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Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law

Can we discuss Fernando Pessoa and his connection with Crowley? Magickal Link published big article about him several years ago. Also, I just found nice article named The magical world of Fernando Pessoa (by Gary Lachman) :

http://www.nthposition.com/themagicalworldof.php

BTW, it is interesting that Gary Lachman was one of the founding members of Blondie.

I am just currious about Crowley's letter about fake suicide. Is this paper still existing somewhere?

Love is the law, love under will


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the_real_simon_iff
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93, Frater_HPK!

Thanks for the link.

There is an awful book called "Encontro Magick" which deals completely with AC and FP. Allegedly awful, because it is published in Portuguese which I don't speak but another Lashtal user told me so. Anyway, it has fascinating facsimiles of a huge amount of letters and articles (this suicide went hugely through the press) as well as the suicide note. I will scan some stuff in and upload it tomorrow or can send it to you if you PM me your email address (I guess attaching still doesn't work within PM). Also I want to bring your attention to this interesting book: http://www.lashtal.com/nuke/Reviews-req-showcontent-id-50.phtml This is in German.

I am also looking for stuff pertaining to this period (it seems there was quite a lot published on AC in French in those years) and am glad to share whenever I find something of interest.

So much for now.

Love=Law
Lutz


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belmurru
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93 Fr. HPK and Simon Iff,

"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
93, Frater_HPK!

I am also looking for stuff pertaining to this period (it seems there was quite a lot published on AC in French in those years) and am glad to share whenever I find something of interest.

So much for now.

Love=Law
Lutz

I would be happy to do that kind of research - I might be well-placed for it. The trouble is, I have no idea where to begin!

What do you suggest?

93 93/93


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the_real_simon_iff
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93!

I just uploaded his suicide note to the galleries under Miscellanea (although "Art by Aleister Crowley" might have been more fitting). It is not approved yet but I am sure will be visible soon.

"belmurru" wrote:
The trouble is, I have no idea where to begin!
What do you suggest?

Maybe we could collect all the existing material first. Off-site, as PDFs or so?

Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

93 All

it is not the first time synchronicities such as these happened to me, but still I never cease to be amazed 😀

As you might notice this is my first post here although I've been a regular on this website for some time now. I am also Portuguese, and I'm currently taking the first steps of being a Thelemite.
Although only recently have I realized that Thelema is my way, I've studied occutlism and world religions for some years and of course I was aware of the connection between Crowley and one of our best (perhaps the best) portuguese poet.

The synchronicity is that for the past month me and a friend of mine (who also studies religion and the occult but from a differente perspective, a deeply portuguese perspective) who is back in Portugal (I'm currently in the UK by the way) started to discuss this issue in detail.
Right now I am short on time, but I hope to write a small essay on our conclusion and findings and I'll try to post the pictures you talked about too (maybe during the weekend).

I will also direct my friend here so that if he has time maybe he can post something before me.

93 93/93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

I think I've posted this in these forums before, but I think it's worth bringing up here. The Norweigan band Ulver have a fantastic rendition of Pessoa's "Christmas" on their new album "Blood Inside". You can hear a snippet of the song if you go here:

http://jester-records.com/releases_sub.php?ID=3 9"> http://jester-records.com/releases_sub.php?ID=39

scroll down and click on the appropriate link in the track listing.


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belmurru
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Posts: 1073
 
"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
93!

I just uploaded his suicide note to the galleries under Miscellanea (although "Art by Aleister Crowley" might have been more fitting). It is not approved yet but I am sure will be visible soon.

"belmurru" wrote:
The trouble is, I have no idea where to begin!
What do you suggest?

Maybe we could collect all the existing material first. Off-site, as PDFs or so?

Love=Law
Lutz

93 Real Simon Iff!

Thanks for the scan. It sounded familiar - the late Symonds must have quoted it. I forgot it was for Hanni Jaeger. She sure sounded hot, as I imagined her. How did that old bugger do it?

As for the rest of the "existing material", I would love to work on getting whatever old French clippings are available together. But... where are they? I.e., does Pessoa's biographer give good citations, etc.?

Love IS the Law...

That's for sure.

Bel Murru


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

93 All

French clippings? What are you talking about?
We have a photo of Crowley's cigar box found with the suicide note and a transcript from the Portuguese newspaper interview with Pessoa about Crowley's "suicide".
I shall try to translate it to english over the weekend (it's quite long) and post it.

By the way, some of the things that Pessoa says on the interview that apparently don't match the truth concern the words in the suicide note: Tu Li Yu and the final word Hisos!
Anyone know anything about this?

93 93/93


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belmurru
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93

"ParrachF" wrote:
93 All

French clippings? What are you talking about?

Real Simon Iff had written above "I am also looking for stuff pertaining to this period (it seems there was quite a lot published on AC in French in those years) and am glad to share whenever I find something of interest."

Since I live in France and work in a library, I thought I might be able to help find some of this stuff (in the press, I presume).

93 93/93


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the_real_simon_iff
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93, all!

To belmurru: The French clippings: the suicide story as well as seemingly some more articles on Crowley were published in the French magazine "Détective: le grand hebdomadaire des faits divers", I found pretty quantitively substantial material in the issues from 2nd May 1929 (obviously not about the suicide) and then from 30th October 1930 (about the suicide). My plan was to get copies from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (sice I can't come to Paris so easily) but they cannot be photocopied so now I am trying to get them on Microfilm. Maybe there are more articles on Crowley in Détective? Maybe you can find out?

To ParrachF: If you talk of the interview with Pessoa in the "Noticias Illustrado" of 4th October 1930, so don't bother for too much translating efforts, I attach the translation here. Of course, if you talk about any other of Pessoa's words on that matter, I hardly can await your translation. As all will see, this can become pretty much material (there is a lot more just in the two books I mentioned) so maybe it is better to take this to PM.

Anyway, here is the translation. From what I read, I would say Pessoa was a part of the plan, or Crowley really prepared him in advance with the stuff about the black magician Yorke. Fascinating and entertaining in any case.

Love=Law
Lutz

Translation from „Noticias Ilustrado“, issue of the 4th. (nominally of the 5th.) October 1930.

1st. Page of cover: (Portrait, yet unpublished, of Aleister Crowley).
Inset: „In this issue / Sensational article / by Augusto Ferreira Gomes / on the / Disappearance of the author / Aleister Crowley. / All rights reserved.“

Article on pages 10, 11 and 16, illustrated with (1) photo of Aleister Crowley, reproduced from frontispiece of „Confessions“, (2) photo of cigarette-case, (3) photos of envelope and letter.

Head-note in italics (by the Editor, José Leitao de Barros):

„Our paper deals in the following pages with an extremely curious case, which our colleague ‚Diario de Noticias’ reported one of these last days. It refers to the appearance of a letter and a cigarette-case, left by a celebrated English author, a mixture of adventurer and artist, who was among us some weeks back, and whose disappearance has not yet been accounted for. We, of course, know nothing for certain on the matter. But, as it so happens that one of our sub-editors was the person who found the mysterious objects, we have had recourse to him, so that he, with the truthfulness which is compulsory in his profession, and the scruple which the matter in itself requires, may tell our readers what he does personally know of the facts in question. The journalist Ferreira Gomes is going to speak:“

The article:

„A SORT OF PREFACE – WHO ALEISTER CROWLEY IS – BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES – THE FIND – WHAT THE PORTER OF THE HOTEL DE L’EUROPE SAID – THE STATEMENT OF LEAVING FOR CINTRA ON THE 23RD.

„When in Portugal some crime is committed, which the Police, in spite of its greatest efforts, is unable to solve, the popular explanation for the negative result of investigations is that the crime was a political one, and thus mistily surrounded by the impenetrability of secret societies...
„When in Lisbon somethinh mysterious happens – something outside the lukewarm tea of our provincial normality -, the excuse found by those who are unable to reason is that the case was just a hoax, or an „advertisement in the American style“...
„Now this is simply convenient. In the first case, no one really refers to the energy spent by the Police, to the loss of time, of sleep and of labour, not to speak of the disappointment when it is not possible to find the criminals.
„In the second case, the fact is that no one seems to conceive anything mysterious existing without the ultimate purpose of some deal or advertisement. But there really are cases – not only in Portugal, but all over the world – which are forever wrapped in shadow, crimes never punished, mysterious happenings for which no explanation is ever found.
„Let us get to the facts in this case.

„In the evening of the 25th. of this month – the ‚Diario de Noticias’ has given the item first-hand – I found at the ‚Boca do Inferno’, near the cleft known as ‚Matacacs’, a letter which was weighed down by a cigarette-case. (The existence of these objects can be verified by the reader on the illustrations which accompany this article. The translation of the letter will be found further on in this narrative.)
„The find was a strange one but I really did not think it of any importance.
„As I know very little English – the letter, apart from its enigmatical symbols, was written in that language -, the only thing I really noticed was the phrase ‚Boca do Infierno’ (sic), wwhich figured in the text. At Cascaes, while I was dining, I examined the letter better. As I have said, I know very little English, but my curiousity made me, after a considerable effort of attention, understand the first phrase, ‚I cannot live without you!’ Now, conecting this phrase with the place where I had found the letter, I was compelled – and anyone would be – to give a good deal more of attention to the subject.
„I had two points of reference – the hotel paper and the name of the lady addressed. I decided for the first as the easier. And so it was that the porter of the Hotel de l’Europe told me that Miss Hanni L. Jaeger has been staying there, but that some days before – on the 19th. – she had gone away. I said then that I had found something belonging to her. The porter replied, ‚The only one who can tell you where that lady is is a gentleman who was with her when she came to Lisbon and who is now at Cintra, in the Hotel Central’...
„’What is his name?’ I asked.
„He went over the hotel book and said his name was Edward A. Crowley.
„Now this name immediately called to my mind that of Aleister Crowley, the celebrated author who had been so often attacked in England owing to his exotic books and his multiple complexities. For the readers’ guidance, I shall give his biography:

„Edward Alexander Crowley – in literature Aleister Crowley – was born at Leamington, England, on the 12th. October 1875. He went to Cambridge where he took no degree. In America, during the Great War, he was a counter-spy in favour of England and so managed things that he spoilt all the German plans.
„James Douglas in the ‚Daily Express’ called him ‚a monster of wickedness’. Horatio Bottomley, in ‚John Bull’, called him ‚a dirty degenerate’. Bottomley’s successors (‚John Bull’, May 1929) call him ‚England’s worst man’. Crowley calls himself the Master Therion and entitles his ‚Confessions’ an autohagiography – in other words, the autobiography of a saint.
„The facts about Aleister Crowley, apart from journalistic attacks, have never been clearly known. He is a scholar and a gentleman, a poet, a mystic, a wild beast hunter, a practician of magical rituals, a chemist and a chess-player. Being a mountain-climber, he has ascended the Alps, the Himalayas and the volcanoes of Mexico – not exactly the characteristics of a degenerate. He has crossed on foot the Sahara, Spain and China. He has lived as a yogi in an Indian village, as a laird in Scotland and as a bohemian in London, Paris and New York. He visited Moscow and founded in Italy, in Villa Santa Barbara, Cefalu, Sicily, a Mystical fraternity.
„His literary production is enormous and distictive. Almost all his publications, issued in limited editions, are to-day bibliographical rarities. Even his enemies do not deny the dramatic force, the wit, the elegance, the learning and the virility of his literary style. His tales, above all, are models of dramatic construction. They have never been given out in editions for the public. This extraordinary man is also a painter.
„One curious note: he was one of the intimate friends of the great sculptor Rodin.

„It was therefore natural that, on verifying the name of Edward A. Crowley, I should at once bring to mind that of Aleister crowley, and that – given the well-known mysteries which surround this individual – I should connect him with the letter (strange in its signs, incomprehensible to me) which I had found.
„Right from there a telephone connection was established with the Hotel Central, in Cintra. Crowley was not there, nor had he stayed there! I found out afterwards that he was not staying in any hotel at that town. I tried next to obtain a translation of the letter, in the translatable part. And by that translation and because, above all, I am a journalist, I found that I had in my hand, at least, a splendid news-item.
„The item could not be published in the issue of the 26th. It was published the next day. And so, at three in the afternoon of this very day, I went to deliver my find to Dr. Alexandrino de Albuquerque.

CROWLEY’S AND MISS JAEGER’S RECORDS – THE PASSING OF THE FRONTIER ON THE 23RD. – THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE LETTER AND CIGARETTE-CASE

„With great courtesy, Dr. Alexandrino de Albuquerque heard my brief statement and sent immediately to the proper department for the records of Crowley and Miss Jaeger.
„He had kind words for the journalist, and he mentioned at this stage, in the middle of the conversation, how necessary it was that our police – so remarkable for its qualities of honesty and discipline – should speedily become perfect in modern methods of investigation of crime, so as, with a different preparation, to be able to stand up against complex criminals, which, though they are fortunately rare, nevertheless are already beginning to turn up in Portugal.
„Crowley’s record arrived. It gave him as having gone out of the country, by the frontier at Viiar Formoso, on the 23rd. The case was, apparently, settled. If Crowley had gone out, then he wasn’t there. At this stage, however, Dr. Alexandrino de Albuquerque was visited by Fernando Pessoa, the author – let it be said in passing, one of the most interesting, if not absolutely the most interesting and the highest mentality of my generation -, my friend since quite long ago. He had known of the case through the ‚Diario de Noticias’ and came to offer what explanations might be needed.
(Further on, in the complete narrative of his relations with Crowley, Mr. Fernando Pessoa recapitulates what he then said.)
„On seeing Crowley’s letter he immediately identified the handwriting. He also stated that he had seen theat cigarette-case in the English author’s hands.
„Miss Jaeger’s records now came in. It bore no date of leaving the country or of having gone anywhere. (I believe that the Imigrattion Police afterwards informed that she had gone out of the country on the S.S. ‚Werra’).
„Let us now see, as a complement, what Mr. Fernando Pessoa says.

IMPORTANT EVIDENCE – SUN IN LIBRA – THE (ALMOST COMPLETE) TRANSLATION OF THE MYSTERIOUS LETTER - WAS CROWLEY IN LSIBON ON THE 24TH?

„’In November of last year I received through the post a prospectus announcing the publication in Six Volumes of ‚The Confessions of Aleister Crowley’. The name was known to me, as it is to everyone who has lived inside civilization, through the vast scandal, got up by English and American papers, which had been created around it. The prospectus was most interesting. I subscribed to the publication, though it was a costly one.
„In the beginning of December I received the first volume of the ‚Confessions’; only that and the second one are, by the bye, yet published. The first volume opens with a horoscope of Crowley. As I am an astrologer, I examined this horoscope with attention, and, when I sent the publishers the remittance for the volume, I put into my letter a final note: I asked them to tell Mr. Crowley that his horoscope seemed to me to be wrong, and that it was probable he had been born a little before the hour for which the horoscope was cast. Several days afterwards I received a letter from Crowley, thanking me for my suggestion and saying it was quite acceptable. It was in this manner that, at a distance, our relations began.
„When, at the end of December, I received the second volume, I sent Crowley three booklets of mine, of English verse, which I had published a good while ago. In thanking me for them, Crowley honoured me with the affirmation that he would like to know me, and that he would seize the opputunity of any likely voyage – for he was frequently travelling – to speak to me if he could.
„This he did. Having to leave England for motives of health, he chose Portugal – or, more properly, the Sun Coast – for a rest-cure place. On the 29th. Of August I received a telegram announcing that he was arriving on the ‚Alcantara’, delayed in Vigo on the account of the fog, arrived on the 2nd. – instead of on the 1st. – of September. I went to the ship and met Crowley, as arranged. Our personal relations date from that day. Crowley brought with him a very young lady, whom I thought English, but afterwards found to be German and called Hanni Larissa Jaeger. The two stayed at Hotel de l’Europe, whence they went, the next day, to Hotel Paris, at Estoril. I met them (the two) only twice after their arrival – once at Estoril, on the 7th., and agin in Lisbon, on the 9th. After the 9th. I never saw Miss Jaeger again.
„On the 18th. September I received a letter from Crowley, written from Hotel Miramar, at Monte Estoril. He said that Miss Jaeger had had, in the vening of the 16th., a violent hysteric fit, which had upset the Hotel Paris from top to bottom; that, on account of that, he had come to Hotel Miramar; but that, in the morning of the 17th., Miss Jaeger had disappeared, leaving only two lines in pencil, saying she ‚would come back soon’. On the same day, the 18th., Crowley turned up in Lisbon, visibly concerned with Miss Jaeger’s disappearance. He said that what particularly worried him was her morbid heredity, her expressed tendency to suicide, and her persuasion that she was being persecuted by a black magician named Yorke. He thought it most urgent therefore that her whereabouts should be ascertained. As I deemed it really important to find Miss Jaeger – whose tendency to suicide, with or without black magicians, was not amusing -, I went to the Central Police, for the Second Commander, Major Joaquim Marques, is a friend of mine, and to him I explained things and asked that something might be done to find out where Miss Jaeger was. This promise I received, and I know it was carried out. As far as I was informed, however, they did not succeed in finding her. I see now, in a paper, that the Police (I don’t know which) found out that she had left the country on the 20th., on board the steamer ‚Werra’, bound for Germany, and that she was American, not German, having even claimed aid from the United States Consulate. I register and wonder. Her passport, such as I saw it and they had it at the Hotel de l’Europe, was a German one.
„Crowley remained in Lisbon at the Hotel de l’Europe from the 18th. Until the 23rd. (excepting Sunday, the 21st., when he went to play chess at Sintra). It was during this stay of his in Lisbon that I spoke more often with him. On the 22nd. He told me, and on the 23rd. He repeated it, that he was going again to Cintra, which he was charmed with, and that he would stay there several days. He said good-bye to me, at half past ten in the morning of the 23rd., at the door of Café Arcada, in Terreiro do Paco. I never again spoke to him. I think I saw him again. On the 24th., coming from Estrella, in the tram that comes down the Avenida, I saw Crowley, or his phantom, turn the corner of Café La Gare to Rua Primeiro de Dezembro. On the same day, in crossing Praça Duque da Terceira, I saw Crowley, or his phantom, enter, with another man, the Tabacaria Ingleza. In neither of the cases was there time, or even reason, to speak to him, nor did I think it very strange that a man who was staying at Cintra should come to Lisbon.
„On the 25th., as I was passing the Hotel de l’Europe, I nevertheless asked the porter if Mr. Crowley was really in Cintra. The porter said that he was and that he would be staying there till the end of the weel. I said I asked him this because I had seen Mr. Crowley, the day before, near the Caes do Sodré Station; to this the porter literally replied, ‚That’s because he was going to Estoril yesterday with a friend he has in Cintra’. This, of course, confirmed my impression, which I really had no reason to doubt, that I had seen Crowley twice on the 24th. The International Police says he passed the frontier on the 23rd. If that be so, so it is; and, in that case, it was not him I saw on the 24th.
„I would willingly accept the indication of the International Police; I would accept, rather less willingly, the hypothesis that this was a hoax of Crowley’s, if it were not for one circumstance, contained in the letter, found at Boca do Inferno, which makes me revert, in some manner, to my primitive impression.
„The letter, literally translated, is as follows:
Year 14, Sun in Libra
L.G.P.
I cannot live without you. The other „Boca do Infernio“ (sic) will get me – it will not be as hot as yours. Hisos!
Tu Li Yu

„I shall explain up to where I understand and the most important part will be left to the end. ‚Year 14’ is no doubt the current year, in the special chronology Crowley adopts, the origin of which I don’t know. I do not know what ‚L.G.P.’ is, but, from the place it has in the letter, it must be Miss Jaeger’s ‚mystic name’ or the initials of it. ‚Hisos’ I do not understand too, but, taking it also by position, it must be a ‚magic word’ understood only by both. I know what ‚Tl Li Yi’ is, for Crowley once spoke to me about that: it is the name of a Chinese sage, who lived about three thousand years before Christ and of whom Crowley claims to be thze present incarnation.
„Now the important point. The date is ‚Sun in Libra’. Now the Sun entered the sign of Libra at 18 hours 36 minutes of the 23rd. Day of September; it will remain in this sign up to about the 22nd. Of October. The letter was therefore written between that hour of the 23rd. And the hour when it was found. A false date? No. An Astrologer may use false dates, as anyone else may, so long as he uses common figures or formulas. What no astrologer, for reasons which it is perhaps not right to reveal, would dare to do, would be to falsify a date written in the signs of the stars. I accept that an astrologer be considered as a madman; but then that superstition must be considered as an inevitable symptom of his madness.
„As to the fact of Crowley signing the letter, not with his own name, nor with any of his occult or masonic names, but with the name that represents what he considers his first representative incarnation, or his first ‚essential presence’, some remarks might be made on that and they would be to some extent pertinent. But what I have said is quite enough.’


(page 16)

„I repeat: these are the facts. Those that happened to me and those that Mr. Fernando Pessoa registers. And, after reckoning, measuring and weighing them, these are the questions I put:
„What is there in all this mystery? What was Crowley’s intention in writing the strange letter? Was it really Crowley who passed the frontier, or was it only his passport? And, if it was he who passed in Villar Formoso, what of the letter left at the Boca do Inferno and is demonstrably written by him? And if he really went away, why did he say at the Hotel de l’Europe, as to Mr. Fernando Pessoa, that ge was going to Cintra?
„These are questions I keep putting to myself, and I can find no answer to them.
„One more mystery to add to so many that have ever girt round Aleister Crowley. Time will give some answer. And, if it give none, then one more mystery will have been swallowed, for evr, and for most men, by the endless night, in the great Mist of the Universe.

---

„It need hardly be said that this case, received with natural interest by the public, was received with equally natural hostility by the prolix fauna of cafés,
„For these poor devils, a great author’s letter can only be found by their leave.
„Apart from that, the letter is forged.

AUGUSTO FERREIRO GOMES


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belmurru
(@belmurru)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1073
 

93 Simon Iff!

Fantastic! What a great story. I'll print it out to add and put it in the right place in my files.

"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
93, all!

To belmurru: The French clippings: the suicide story as well as seemingly some more articles on Crowley were published in the French magazine "Détective: le grand hebdomadaire des faits divers", I found pretty quantitively substantial material in the issues from 2nd May 1929 (obviously not about the suicide) and then from 30th October 1930 (about the suicide). My plan was to get copies from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (sice I can't come to Paris so easily) but they cannot be photocopied so now I am trying to get them on Microfilm. Maybe there are more articles on Crowley in Détective? Maybe you can find out?

Thanks for this. Maybe my own library has copies of that magazine going back that far. But I'll see what I can do.

Great stuff!

93 93/93

Bel Murru


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belmurru
(@belmurru)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1073
 

93

Here's some information on the suicide stunt from the Red Flame pages, which most of you will know, but some (like me until a half hour ago) probably did not.

(here is information on Pessoa as well, which the author calls an "unscrupulous newspaper man".)

http://www.redflame93.com/Dickie.html

93 93/93


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lashtal
(@lashtal)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5330
 

Wow, Lutz!

Thank you so much for your lengthy post. Wonderful stuff!

Regards,

Paul

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

There was supposedly a picture of Crowley and Jaeger in profile that was published at that time. Is it still extant?


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

93

Hello all.
Sorry for the late reply. This is the complete analysis that me and my friend did on this most interesting subject. First le tme appologize if any typos are still present.
I hope it's a good read, and that we can have a healty discussion afterwards. Some Appendixes contain the poems of Pessoa directly linked to the subject, some of them in Portuguese. These would make this post astronomically huge (22 pages on Word) so I will post these upon request, or later.

93 93/93

________________________________________________________________

It is well known the interest Fernando Pessoa had, through all of his live, for the occult, esotericism and magic. From his poems, letters and other random texts one can clearly trace his steps in these worlds. From Spiritualism, through Astrology, Neo-Paganism (a very personal Neo-Paganism, not to be confused with more modern Neo-Paganism), Theosophy, Gnosticism, Alchemy and Magic, Rosicrucianism, Templarism to, finally, Mystical and Cosmopolitan Nationalism [1].
As far as Thelema goes, the first contacts appear to have been in the magic phases (naturally). The earliest confirmation of this appears in a letter by Pessoa dating from 1917, an order for Liber 777, as follows:

Fernando Pessoa
Rua de S.Julião, 101, 1º
Lisbon (Portugal), 6th. March 1917

Mr. Frank Hollings,
7,Great Turnstile, Holborn,
London, W.C.

Dear Sir:
I thank you for your Catalogue of Books on the Occult Sciences, which I have just received, and am sending you herewith British Postal Orders totalling 10/ -, for which please send me, as soon as possible, «Book 777» (Catalogue, page 50) – 7/6, the extra 2/6 being to cover postage by registering book-post.
As postage is not likely to cost quite as much as 2/6, there will probably be a small balance in my favour; please do not remit it, as I hope shortly to have occasion to order other books.
Thanking you in advance for your early attention to this, I am, Dear Sir,

Yours faithfully, [2]

The next reference to Thelema appears to be a letter, dating from 18/10/29, to “The Mandrake Press”, this one apparently for the purchase of the first volume of Crowley’s “Confessions”, in this letter, Pessoa clearly states that he possessed one other book by Crowley, the Liber 777. Then two months latter one can easily find, again in a letter by Pessoa [3] to “The Mandrake Press”, dating from 4/12/1929, this letter is referred by many authors as the one that started the whole Pessoa–Crowley relationship [1] [4]. In this letter Pessoa, among other things, warns of an error in Crowley’s horoscope present in the first volume of his “Confessions”, and asks that this error be communicated to him. The letter, naturally in English:

That same month, more precisely 9/12/29 [5] Pessoa receives a letter from “The Mandrake Press”, informing him about the release of the second volume of Crowley’s Confessions and that his previous letter was forwarded to Crowley, who would write to him very shortly, which happened in 11/12/29. The first strange fact about this first letter is that, according to sources [5], in this same letter Crowley immediately refers to Pessoa as “Care Frater”, signing as “Therion 666”. In this letter by Crowley, he justifies his error, saying that the exact time of his birth was unsure, that firstly he publish the date 0º.3 at ascending Leo in the magazine Equinox, that Pessoa bought, and were he probably gathered the elements for his correction, but then later Crowley assumed one other time for he suspected that Uranus and Saturn were between the first and seventh house, respectively. [6]
In response Pessoa sends both to Crowley and “The Mandrake Press”, three English poem books that he mentions were publish “over here” some time ago. To these poems Crowley responds in a rather strange way, on 22/12/29, saying that the poems sent by Pessoa were to him like a true “Message”, that he would like to clarify personally, asking then if Pessoa would be in Lisbon in the next three months for an encounter [5][6]. This could be a possible reference to the esoteric poem book “Mensagem” (which is the Portuguese word for ‘message’) Pessoa would publish in 1934.
In response Pessoa sends him another letter, in 6/1/30, where Crowley is also referred to as “Carissime Frater” [3]:

This may seem a little odd, that Crowley would be wiling to encounter Pessoa, in the flesh, without having had any direct communication with him asides a few letters. It could be possible that the two actually had already met, or at least corresponded. As J. Symonds, Crowley’s biographer, would say about their encounter (which will be discussed in more detail): “They had been corresponding for a year”. It is then possible that the two had been corresponding before the horoscope correction.
Now, for the next months the two will be discussing their encounter via mail. Some of Pessoas’ letters [3]:

25/2/30:

19/5/30

After this the two eventually meet in Lisbon 2/9/30, and here the mystery of the “Boca do Inferno” begins.
During this time not only Pessoa meets Crowley, that arrives with Hanni Jaeger, but also Augusto Ferreira Gomes, a journalist, great admirer of Crowley and friend and companion of Pessoa in their dealings with the occult, and one other friend Crowley apparently had in Sintra, that is never named.
A few days later the news breaks, Crowley had apparently committed suicide.
The media is all over the news of course, and a Portuguese journalist investigating the case, finds, in a rather casual manner Crowley’s suicide note, along with a cigarette box, depicting an Egyptian stile initiation picture, near the “Boca do Inferno” in Cascais. The journalist is none other than Augusto Ferreira Gomes.

The suicide note with the Portuguese translation:

And the cigarette box:

Augusto Ferreira Gomes, always the impartial and uninvolved journalist, decides to interview someone that had been with Crowley in those last days, Fernando Pessoa. The interview reveals to be a continuous string of lies and false information, the full interview, being in Portuguese, is in appendix A, but the relevant parts will be translated.

First, Pessoas’ comments on the suicide note:

“I shall explain up to where I understand and the most important part will be left to the end. ‚Year 14’ is no doubt the current year, in the special chronology Crowley adopts, the origin of which I don’t know. I do not know what ‚L.G.P.’ is, but, from the place it has in the letter, it must be Miss Jaeger’s ‚mystic name’ or the initials of it. ‚Hisos’ I do not understand too, but, taking it also by position, it must be a ‚magic word’ understood only by both. I know what ‚Tu Li Yi’ is, for Crowley once spoke to me about that: it is the name of a Chinese sage, who lived about three thousand years before Christ and of whom Crowley claims to be the present incarnation.”

The most immediate elements of the lie in this quote is Pessoas’ explanation of “Tu Li Yu”. Well, if we consult Crowley’s Confessions, a book Pessoa possessed and read, we find his list of previous incarnations, from all of them only one is Chinese “Ko Hsuan” one of Lao-Tzé’s disciples. Pessoa knew this. More strangely, Pessoa says that it was Crowley that had told him about “Tu Li Yu”, and further more Lao-Tzé lived in between the 6th and 8th century BC, not 3000 BC.
In this little point a few conclusions can be directly taken from this:
1º - Pessoa lied about “Tu Li Yu”, simply, or with instructions to do so from Crowley;
2º - Crowley had lied in his Confessions, and either his true Chinese incarnation is “Tu Li Yu” and, having lived in 3000 BC, was not a disciple of Lao-Tzé or Tu Li Yu is another incarnation;
3º - Crowley’s Chinese incarnation was in fact the one named in the Confessions “Ko Hsuan”, but he lied to Pessoa in order to trick him into giving false information (very unlikely);

One other thing is the date, Pessoa specifically mentions the year 14, but any close observation of the letter clearly reveals that the year is I4 (22+4+1904=1930, as would be logical since this was the calendar standard used by Crowley and the A:.A:.). Furthermore he states that he doesn’t know what Crowley’s chronology means, again very unlikely.

“Crowley remained in Lisbon at the Hotel de l’Europe from the 18th. Until the 23rd. (except Sunday 21st., when he went to play chess at Sintra). It was during his stay in Lisbon that I spoke more often with him. On the 22nd. He told me, and on the 23rd. He repeated it, that he was going again to Sintra, which he was charmed with, and that he would stay there several days. He said good-bye to me, at half past ten in the morning of the 23rd., at the door of Café Arcada, in Terreiro do Paco. I never again spoke to him. I think I saw him again. On the 24th., coming from Estrella, in the tram that comes down the Avenida, I saw Crowley, or his phantom, turn the corner of Café La Gare to Rua Primeiro de Dezembro. On the same day, in crossing Praça Duque da Terceira, I saw Crowley, or his phantom, enter, with another man, the Tabacaria Ingleza.”

A few more lies in here. Pessoa was with Crowley a lot more than this, one can easily prove this by a quick look in Crowley’s diary:

“Sep. 21. I decide to do a suicide stunt to annoy Hanni. Arrange details with Pessoa.” [1]

This trip to Sintra, mentioned in the interview, has been studied by a few authors [1] [4], some suggests the friend Crowley had in Sintra as the Freemason Pedro Carvalho Monteiro, owner of the “Quinta da Regaleira”, a very strange and mysterious estate, full of statues, caves, wells, towers and gardens, depicting various mythological stories and esoteric symbolism. This connection however has never been proven.

After all this it may be hard to believe any other statements given by Pessoa in this interview.

Now, the main question here is what exactly did Crowley come to Portugal to do that required all this cover up? A possible answer in his diary:

“I was obliged to leave immediately for Lisbon in order to establish there a headquarter for the Order under Don Fernando Pessoa” [1]

Very well, but what Order?
It is a fact that only in very recent history, and for a brief period of time, did the O.T.O. have an active headquarters in Portugal, so that’s highly unlikely. Furthermore he have that for a fact Pessoa was a member of the A:.A:. in 1932 (I6=22+6+1904)
This is a circular found in his house [1]:

It is known that the A:.A:. doesn’t exactly work in a lodge system, so, there is no need for a headquarters. Furthermore, to be initiated in the A:.A:. Pessoa probably had to be initiated into something else before, but that something else is a complete mystery. It is possible that Pessoa was directly initiated into the A:.A:., he had a strange way a working and thinking. For him thinking was writing, he forced order into his chaotic mind by writing his thoughts on paper, and then, “digest” them, assimilating almost anything he read or saw. This technique is used by many writers. If we take this to the extreme we could say that Pessoa might have initiated himself in Thelema. In his personal library, besides the Confessions and Liber 777, he also had “Magick in Theory and Practice” [1]. It could be possible that he reached a level where Crowley agreed to initiate him directly into the A:.A:. instead of the O.T.O., which was probably Crowley’s first idea, but most likely not Pessoa’s. As he was extremely shy and socially inept, being the head of an order would probably be too much for him. The solitary A:.A:. system would probably attract him a great deal more.
One could continue to speculate, and say that in fact, while in Portugal, Crowley initiated Pessoa in the O.T.O. but again due to his social relationship problems Pessoa never got round to initiate anyone else, as he died only five years later, in 1935, taking the Portuguese headquarters with him, but this still won’t explain the A:.A:. circular.

After this incident the two continue to communicate, a very interesting series of letters appears between 26/10/30 and 11/12/31 [3]. These letters aren’t directed to Crowley though, they are addressed to João Gaspar Simões, the director of a magazine where Pessoa intervened occasionally (since these letters are in Portuguese they will be placed in appendix B).
Apparently Pessoa had shown João Gaspar Simões a poem entitled “Ultimo Sortilégio” (“Last Hex”, in a rough translation), Appendix C, inspired by Crowley’s “Hymn to Pan”. Simões was so impressed by the poem that Pessoa sent him a translation of the “Hymn to Pan”, translated by himself, also on Appendix C. In the letter Pessoa also strongly tells him that that poem was not to be published, it was only a curious remark, that it was a poem by Master Therion, who had died, of suicide or homicide, mentioning that this last possibility came from an English policemen that was working on the case. But as time goes by, Pessoa, changes his mind. He suddenly says that in fact it was fine, he could publish it. But as more time goes by, what first was a publication authorisation becomes panic, as the poem was taking too long to be published. During these letters Pessoa also states, in a very casual way, that Crowley was alive and well in Germany, this happened before his “official” return.

Parallel to all this Pessoa continues his correspondence with “The Mandrake Press”, proposing to translate English books to Portuguese (Crowley’s mainly) and Portuguese classic to English:

“Mister Crowley suggested that I publish, if possible or desirable, some of my poems in English; the ones that are present in the two books I sent you, excluding the part entitled «Inscriptions» and adding one poem that, with «Antinous» and «Epithalamium» would make a significant triptych. To the book made up by these three poems, Mister Crowley very kindly offered to write the preface and no one better that him could do so.”[6]

«Antinous» and «Epithalamium» in Appendix D.

And this was on the 12th of September, therefore, during Crowley’s stay in Portugal. Also a note by Crowley sent to Pessoa mentions that he wanted to talk to him about “the translations” and “editions” [6]. These facts lead some authors [6] to suggest that the encounter of the two would have a very un-esoteric side to it, with Pessoa trying to get “The Mandrake Press” to open the English market to him and Crowley hoping that Pessoa would help him find a capitalist that would sponsor Crowley’s new “Aquila Press”[6].
Furthermore, during this correspondence with Simões there appear a few other letters, between the two, an excerpt from one dating from 3/12/30, about the already mentioned translation of the “Hymn to Pan”:

“I wrote to you this morning and I’m writing to you again, with a kind of offer of peace to the Eleventh Circle mentioned in one of your previous letters.
I’m sending you on of the products of my recent restless rest – a translation to Portuguese of the “Hymn to Pan”, by Master Therion. Next I will send you a literal translation of that translation, so as to the referred circle may by consulted about it’s interioricity.
As Portuguese has the same malleability and fluidity as English (it’s the only Latin language to have this), there were no radical difficulties in the translation. The original rhythm was strictly kept and its shape and colour of sense were not lost. There are a few, necessary differences from the literal; the main one is due to the fact that while “Man” rimes perfectly with “Pan”, “homem” is not as good. The Portuguese verse «Meu homem e afã» means «My man and my desire!», not deviating that much from the Mark.”

One other letter appears, from 10/2/31, apparently regarding the funding of a magazine or novel, mentioning a capitalist. This novel could be the one of the few books Pessoa and Crowley had planed to publish together [5], probably one about Crowley’s suicide in the “Boca do Inferno”, a story involving an English policemen, probably the same from the letter to Simões.
The letter:

One other interesting question is the identity of “Sister Anu”, to which Pessoa refers to in the letter? Probably Hanni Jaeger, although it should be noted that he says ‘Sister’ and not ‘Soror’.

Then one more, from 13/2/31:

“(…) the second thing is the translation of “Him to Pan” will be published in the January-February number of “Presença”, of Coimbra. My last «O Último sortilégio» was published in the November-December number. As soon as the January-February number is out I will send you a copy. I think that will be in a weeks time.

After that a long period of silence passes as letters from Crowley continue, from 1931 to 1932, always with much more enthusiasm from Crowley, with exclamations like (25/2/31) “I would like to see the Sunflower, and even more your translation do the Hymn to Pan”, (18/9/31) “What happened to you? Not even a word in all these months – you owe me many letters, not to mention the magazine with the translation of the Hymn to Pan, the police novel and that fat capitalist”, as his monetary issues from this period are well known, than availability from Pessoa, that writes a response 5/10/31:

“The translation of “Hymn to Pan” was sent to “Presença” too late for the May number; the next number was the anniversary one and only old things from collaborators were published. I hope the translations will be present in the next one, which will be out any minute now, before the end of the year. This “Presença” is the only magazine here really literary, and it’s publication is, evidently, irregular. As soon as the translation is published I’ll send you a copy.”

However, he will never send it. As Pessoa drifts away from Crowley, and continues his mystical path to a much different and personal place, as he travels from his magical phase to his Mystical Nationalism phase.

Appendix A - containing Pessoa's interview for the newspaper:
posted above by the_real_simon_iff

Appendix B - containing scans of Pessoa's letters, most in Portuguese:
I can post and translate them upon request

Appendix C - containing Pessoa's poem "O Ultimo Sortilegio" and his translation of the Hymn to Pan, both in portuguese:
upon request

Appendix D - containing Pessoa's poems "Antinous" and "Epithalamium", both in english:
upon request

References:
[1] – José Manuel Anes, Fernando Pessoa e os Mundos Esotéricos, Esquilo Editores, Lisboa, 2004;
[2] – Fernando Pessoa, Biblioteca Fernando Pessoa e a Geração de Orpheu – Correspondências 1916-1925, Planeta DeAgostini, Madrid, 2006;
[3] - Fernando Pessoa, Biblioteca Fernando Pessoa e a Geração de Orpheu – Correspondências 1926-1935, Planeta DeAgostini, Madrid, 2006;
[4] – Vítor Manuel Adrião, Mistérios Iniciáticos do Rei do Mundo – Historia Oculta de Portugal, Madras Editora Ltda, São Paulo, 2002;
[5] – (site) - i.pt/portal/programs/ewpview.aspx?codigo=MAGIA
[6] - (site) - http://www.fcsh.unl.pt/deps/estudosalemaes/Pubs/P_Helena_Barbas_29_Jan_2003.asp
[7] – (site) - http://www.fpessoa.com.ar/


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the_real_simon_iff
(@the_real_simon_iff)
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93, ParrachF

This is such an intersting topic, I wonder why it was never completely researched, at least not in the English language.

"ParrachF" wrote:
The most immediate elements of the lie in this quote is Pessoas’ explanation of “Tu Li Yu”. Well, if we consult Crowley’s Confessions, a book Pessoa possessed and read, we find his list of previous incarnations, from all of them only one is Chinese “Ko Hsuan” one of Lao-Tzé’s disciples. Pessoa knew this. More strangely, Pessoa says that it was Crowley that had told him about “Tu Li Yu”, and further more Lao-Tzé lived in between the 6th and 8th century BC, not 3000 BC.
In this little point a few conclusions can be directly taken from this:
1º - Pessoa lied about “Tu Li Yu”, simply, or with instructions to do so from Crowley;
2º - Crowley had lied in his Confessions, and either his true Chinese incarnation is “Tu Li Yu” and, having lived in 3000 BC, was not a disciple of Lao-Tzé or Tu Li Yu is another incarnation;
3º - Crowley’s Chinese incarnation was in fact the one named in the Confessions “Ko Hsuan”, but he lied to Pessoa in order to trick him into giving false information (very unlikely);

Concerning Tu Li Yu, I think the most convincing theory (to me) is, that Pessoa, who was clearly part of the suicide plot (the biggest prove probably is, that the cigarette case that was ascribed to being Crowley's belonged to Pessoa's brother-in-law Francisco Caetano Dias), did not get the joke. On 14. December 1930 Cowley sent a humourous letter to Pessoa, and sigend with "Benjamin Q. Knickerbocker": "I do not know the sage Tu Li Yu - but Tooley-oo is jocose London slang for Au Revoir!" Crowley surely had some fun about making a secret out of this.

I will re-read Marco Pasi's book on the topic and see what more is already known. But first I got to read your post again...thanks for that...

Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
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Hi there wolf,
93
apparently you didn't carefully read my extensive post 🙂 The A.'.A.'. circular in Pessoa's possession is in one of the photos.
As for your own comments:
1) That's not exatcly true. A portuguese OTO, whether official or not I cannot tell, has existed. Although roughly two years ago it ceased it's functions. I had some contact with it's leaders and I know that this was a manifestation of another order named Collegium Ad Spiritum Sanctum (like Crowley's school in Cefalu) and that it was under the authority of yet another one: The Societe de Chevaliers Zobop. Of these two I know close to nothing as it's members were very secretive and always avoided answering my questions.
When they ceased to be, a post on their forums stated that the OTO (as the Martinist Order and the Gnostic Church, all manifestations under the authority of the Societe) were not to return before 3 years have passed... and that all members currently working on some grade would be transfered to the corresponding Collegium Grade...
I know by fact that the Martinist Order has rebooted in the past year, although just in an experimental phase.

As for the OTO, I was extremely surprised to recently find out a new website http://oto-portugal.org/ and that it appears on the links section of several other official OTO (I mean the caliphate) websites as the Portuguese branch! I sent them an e-mail asking for more info but never got a reply.

3) As for the deviations in Pessoa's translation I refer you also to one of his letters in my post:

As Portuguese has the same malleability and fluidity as English (it’s the only Latin language to have this), there were no radical difficulties in the translation. The original rhythm was strictly kept and its shape and colour of sense were not lost. There are a few, necessary differences from the literal; the main one is due to the fact that while “Man” rimes perfectly with “Pan”, “homem” is not as good. The Portuguese verse «Meu homem e afã» means «My man and my desire!», not deviating that much from the Mark.”

93 93/93


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 Anonymous
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Hello again wolf,
93
I also don't know if it is indeed a A.'.A.'. circular because I've never seen one (maybe someone else in the forum) but since it contains the new word of the equinox it seems logical that it is some form of correspondence sent to all members at that time. And in this case I think it is reasonable to imagine the same letter being copied to all members.
As for the "Encontro Magick" writer, I never read the book so I'm not sure who you are talking about. But I'm interested in knowing if indeed it is who I was refering to. Maybe we can discuss this in private.
As for Pan, I merely quoted what Pessoa himself said, or wrote, to his friend. I have skimmed through Helena Barbas's website once but never got the time to carefully read it through. I promess I'll do it and post my comments.
As for my portuguese, it is fine: me being portuguese and all 🙂

93 93/93


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 Anonymous
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93

Given the recent news (also on the frontpage of LAShTAL) me and my friend that co-authored the analysis that I posted here more than a year ago, have decided to re-evaluate it in preparation for the digital release of the "Crowley Dossier"(has it is being named by the press) and Pessoa's library (which should include his side notes on Crowley's books).

Since last year, we have also delved deeper into the Thelemic Pessoa, reading something from some of his poems. This, as far as we know, has never been properly studied or published.
As such, we are entertaining the idea of expanding the analysis of the "Boca do Inferno" affair, including analysis of the forthcoming digitalisations, and an analysis of the Thelemic phase of Pessoa.
We are considering publishing it in Portugal (of course) but I would consider writing an english version as well and eventually publishing it, if you guys think there is enough interest.

So let me know if you think it's worth spending the next year doing just that 🙂

93 93/93


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the_real_simon_iff
(@the_real_simon_iff)
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93!

It is probably not very surprising that I for one would be delighted if you would spend your time creating stuff like this. It might be good to contact other researchers like maybe Marco Pasi or Martin P. Starr or people like Bill Breeze beforehand so that you are not working on something that other researchers are working on too. But go on, I am sure it will be a fascinating journey.

By the way: Do you know if the digitized Pessoa/Crowley files are or will be online anywhere? I can't find anything on the Lisbon University website. Although I do not speak Portuguese, my wife does near perfectly.

Thanks in advance
Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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93 the_real_simon_iff!
Thanks for the kind words. Getting in touch with them might in fact be a good idea. Thanks for that as well.

As for the digitized files according to the newspaper Publico they will first be put online in the Linguistics Center website ( http://www.clul.ul.pt/) and later will find a home of their own in the National Library website ( http://www.bn.pt/default.asp)

We are algo gonna try to contact the digitalizer at the Lisbon Uni. to see when the Crowley Dossier is coming out or if we can get our hands on it before that.

Needless to say, I'll keep you posted


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gurugeorge
(@gurugeorge)
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Fascinating topic, and some great research being done by people here.

As a side-note, Marcelo Motta always called Fernando Pessoa a Magister Templi, and published some very mystical poems of Pessoa's in his edition of the Equinox that suggest Pessoa was indeed mystically experienced.

It may be a case of the artist "fingering the old school tie", as Crowley says somewhere. As I understand it, Crowley thought that an artist of a high enough level is pretty much equivalent to a mystic or magician of a certain level in the A:.A:. system, and it might only take a nudge and a wink from an adept to fully awaken them. Crowley may have felt that Pessoa was sufficiently advanced simply through his artistic work and temperament, or occult work he'd done previously, not to need to go through the introductory A:.A:. materials.


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 Anonymous
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"gurugeorge" wrote:
As I understand it, Crowley thought that an artist of a high enough level is pretty much equivalent to a mystic or magician of a certain level in the A:.A:. system, and it might only take a nudge and a wink from an adept to fully awaken them. Crowley may have felt that Pessoa was sufficiently advanced simply through his artistic work and temperament, or occult work he'd done previously, not to need to go through the introductory A:.A:. materials.

93 gurugeorge!

Yes, that's precisely what I believe. With the added extra that Pessoa himself had been searching for mystical/occult paths for some time, having tried most of the ones available at the time (freemasonry, rosicrucianism, Golden Dawn, etc.)

More to come in 5 minutes.

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 Anonymous
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93 All!

During our re-gathering of materials to begin our quest, and in particular looking for a diagram of the Tree of Life made by Pessoa himself (where he supposedly contraposes Magic and Alchemy on the two pillars) my friend in Portugal found an appendix that would have saved us all a lot of trouble...

I'm talking about the book entitled "Fernando Pessoa e os Mundos Esotéricos" (Fernando Pessoa and the Esoteric Worlds) by José Manuel Anes, from 2004ev. The book deals with much detail in the esoteric phases of Pessoa. This appendix, which being unnamed in the table of contents has escaped us for the past months, is named "Fernando Pessoa, um "Mago Vermelho"? - em busca de influências crowleianas nos textos de Pessoa -", i.e. Fernando Pessoa, a "Red Mage"? - in search of crowleyan influences in Pessoa's writings.

This 17 page long text was presented in 2000ev, in a Colloquium in Cascais(Portugal, close to Lisbon and Sintra) and this fact will be important, in due time.

The author begins by quoting a letter sent by Augusto Ferreira Gomes' wife (i.e. the wife of the journalist that interviewed Pessoa regarding Crowley "suicide") where she call him "Mage Rouge"(Red Mage, in french). The author considers this to mean Pessoa was somehow interested in Tantra, namely the Red Tantrism, as described by Marc-Alain Descamps. He divides Tantrism in Black, White and Red. From my understanding the Red corresponds to the Vama Marg or Vamachara, that Grant wrote so much of. This is, I reckon the weakest point of the whole essay, and though he uses this to jump to Crowley, all his other points are independent of this.

He has some good references, mainly Symonds, Pasi, Koenig, Duquette and Crowley's books that speak for themselves, and others regarding Pessoa. He clearly did his research. He even quotes Pasi's claim that Crowley intended to fund a lodge of the OTO under the head of Pessoa (a claim that, I am told, is supported in "Encontro Magick"). This author, like ourselves, disagrees based on the fact that Pessoa was extremelly anti-social. The A.'.A.'., with it's indivudal based work, would be much more to the liking of Pessoa, especially considering that he once belonged to the Golden Dawn! He then entertains the possibility that Crowley went to see Pessoa, in fact to transmit some rituals and degrees (maybe even of the OTO as well, but in a purely administrative way).

He then talks a bit about the sexual rites in the OTO and A.'.A.'. systems and how Pessoa would loosely fit in them.

As for true influence of Thelema in Pessoa's writings. Apparently such a work was published back in 1998ev, co-authored by Paula Costa. I'll try to get hold on this, but in this article the author claims the have grouped them in 3 classes: i) writings influenced by the degree structure and initiatory content; ii) writings that reveal Thelemic interpretations and content; iii) writings that include some kind of Tantrism, in particular the ones called "O Caminho da Serpente" (The Path of the Serpent).

The essay ends with an analysis of Pessoa's "Essay on Initiation", but unfortunately falls short of showing something purely Thelemic (Maybe the 1998ev article will prove to be better).

Last, but not least, there is a note, written 2 years after the Colloquium (which was on June 3rd of 2000ev). He explains that this essay was presented in the Colloquium in the presence of serious researchers (A. Faivre, M. Introvigne and J. Gordon Melton), portuguese experts on Pessoa and other members of the public. However the author found it both funny and strange that this same ideas were reproduced in Marco Pasi's article in "Mélanges offertes à Antoine Faivre" (of 2002ev). Apparently Marco Pasi showed up in Cascais, vaguely talking about the chess picture of Crowley (recently seen in The Independent article) and erroneously thinking the other man was Pessoa! Yes, erroneously, although in this essay Anes does not give a clue as to who it really is! Maybe Crowley's friend in Sintra, maybe a random man... After watching José Manuel Anes talk on this essay, Pasi publicly said he "totally" agreed with what was just said, what Anes didn't expect was that he would not cite him in the above mentioned article! Anes was advised by Prof. Faivre not to "overestimate" too much this...

Let me finish by saying that this is as written by the author of the book, and I have not (and probably can not) confirm all this, but I have no reason not to believe him.

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lashtal
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New York Times article

Link corrected at 1838 on 19 July 2008

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lashtal
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This story seems to have captured the imagination of the world's press. Here. for example, is part of an article from today's UK Observer newspaper. Note once again that AC is referred to as a "mystic and occultist" - only the laziest reporters resort these days to the traditional "satanist and drug addict" epithets:

How a shy poet was spellbound by the Beast
Lisbon battle to halt auction of literary treasures

John Hooper
Sunday July 20, 2008
The Observer

It was among the unlikeliest literary friendships of the 20th century. On the one hand, Fernando Pessoa, the painfully shy Portuguese poet, master of pseudonyms and melancholy, whose literary genius went all but unrecognised in his lifetime. On the other, Aleister Crowley, the flamboyant, self-publicising British mystic and occultist who earned the title of 'the wickedest man in the world'.

Yet for several years these two very different men kept up an extensive correspondence that is now at the centre of a potentially explosive literary controversy. The Portuguese government is deciding whether to step in to prevent an auction of more than 2,000 pages of documents kept by Pessoa, an official source in Lisbon confirmed. The documents include 800 pages of letters and other papers relating to Pessoa's friendship with Crowley...

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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Earlier in the thread someone mentioned Macro Pasi's research about AC & Pessoa. In fact there is a whole chapter in Pasi's book on this relationship with many of the letters, reproduced above as images, transcribed. In fact Pasi claims his book, first published in Italian, was the initial publication of those letters. Nevertheless, his book on AC and politics is currently out in Italian and German, and the initial English translation has been completed. However there is some editing necessary. Having read the English translation, I can attest to the fact the Pessoa chapter has a lot of information in it and is well worth reading.

It is scheduled to be released by Equinox publishing in March 2009. Here is the page or it:
http://www.equinoxpub.com/books/showbook.asp?bkid=310

As can be seen on the site, the Pessoa chapter breaks out as follows:

4. The Mouth of Hell
1. Fernando Pessoa’s political mysticism
2. The magician and the poet
3. A fake suicide
4. The ghost of the magician


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newneubergOuch2
(@newneubergouch2)
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Just bumping this interesting thread as Lashtal members seem to be curious about this man lately (in the babble-on box).


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jamie barter
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I notice that the contents of this thread appear to be relevant to one in the forums lately vis-à-vis one of A.C.’s ‘lost’ Portugeuse diaries.

Norma N Joy Conquest


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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From what I can tell Pessoa was just an acquaintance, and not a member of the AA or OTO nor a major friend of Crowley.  But I like his poetry. I have to find a good English translation to buy.


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lashtal
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"christibrany" wrote:
From what I can tell Pessoa was just an acquaintance, and not a member of the AA or OTO nor a major friend of Crowley.  But I like his poetry. I have to find a good English translation to buy.

See Marco Pasi's excellent and substantial article The Influence of Aleister Crowley on Fernando Pessoa's Esoteric Writings - there's more to the Crowley-Pessoa connection than you might imagine:

As to Crowley's influence on Pessoa's esoteric fragments, though this article does not pretend to be more than a preliminary survey, it cannot be denied that Pessoa took Crowley's writings and ideas quite seriously. He may have had ambivalent ideas about him personally, but it seems certain that Crowley's doctrines strongly appealed to him. As we have seen, this goes so far that it would be impossible to understand some passages of his esoteric writings without the background of Crowley's.

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christibrany
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Very nice thank you sir 🙂


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