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Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol  

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wulfram
(@wulfram)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 137
24/09/2009 1:14 pm  

Reading Brown's latest and I was surprised to find Old Crow show up.

Page 287.

The book has its problems, but I do not doubt for a minute that many people here would find this an intriguing read. Steeped in the lore of various Mystery Traditions, Ceremonial Magic, Freemasonry, the Rosicruscians, and more... it's no Foucault's Pendulum, but it's worth a look.


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SatansAdvocaat
(@satansadvocaat)
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Posts: 351
24/09/2009 2:00 pm  

Actually, Wulfram, as Dan Brown keeps churning them out I would have been more surprised if 'Old Crow' had not eventually shown up in one of his novels.

I'll check it out when it turns up in the library - certainly wouldn't wish to encourage him by buying a copy. But if anyone wishes to comment on the 'portrayal' I'd be interested.

The Crowley/Thelema based material in 'Foucault's Pendulum' is truly weird, by the way.

Regards - S.A.


The Children of Transgression are the Dragons of the Law.


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wulfram
(@wulfram)
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Posts: 137
24/09/2009 2:12 pm  

Here's a bit from Brown's novel:

Then he discovered the writings of Aleister Crowley - a visionary mystic from the early 1900s - whom the church had deemed "the most evil man who ever lived." Great minds are always feared by lesser minds. Andros learned about the power of ritual and incantation. He learned that sacred words, if properly spoken, functioned like keys that opened gateways to other worlds. There is a shadow universe beyond this one... a world from which I can draw power. And although Andros longed to harness that power, he knew there were rules and tasks to be completed beforehand.

Become something holy, Crowley wrote. Make yourself sacred.


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Proteus
(@proteus)
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Posts: 243
24/09/2009 11:49 pm  

93

Looks like a fair representation based on the excerpt from the book posted by wulfram. Most objective, non-inflammatory, and correct description I've seen in a while. But who am I to judge!

The last part "Become something..." is a bit odd, though.

93 93/93


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gurugeorge
(@gurugeorge)
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25/09/2009 12:05 am  

Also odd is "whom the church deemed ..." Wasn't it the tabloid newspapers who dubbed him that?

Either it's just slapdash research, or Brown knows something we don't 8)


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
25/09/2009 1:50 am  

It was churches that reviled him as well so it fits. LOL


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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25/09/2009 1:26 pm  

Having an accompanying guide to this novel, displayed prominently(right at the front door on a table) in a little grocery store where I live (a conservative mormonesque town in Nebraska) I felt contradictory emotions. My Aiwass, there is a photo of the Old Crow and a section on Enochian Magic among the peaches and penumbras! I was able to tell my 12 year old, who says "you're always talking about Aleister Crowley", see now he's in the grocery store!


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Michael Staley
(@michael-staley)
MANIO - it's all in the egg
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3948
25/09/2009 4:34 pm  
"gurugeorge" wrote:
Either it's just slapdash research, or Brown knows something we don't 8)

It needn't be a case of slapdash research, but of manipulating facts. How much historical accuracy should we expect in a novel?

Many years ago I came across The House of Dr Dee by Peter Acroyd. It was (and still is, I expect) an engrossing novel, but it struck me as odd at first that the novelist had Dee's house located in Clerkenwell, when the whole world and their hamster knew that Dee Towers was at Mortlake.

Of course when it comes to a work of fiction, the novelist will play around with facts as much or as little as they like. Kenneth Grant described his novel Against the Light as quasi-autobiographical. "Quasi" means "having the appearance of", though that doesn't stop some intrepid souls trying to track down the witch Awryd or Dr Phineas Black.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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SatansAdvocaat
(@satansadvocaat)
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Posts: 351
26/09/2009 12:01 pm  

Welcome back from Seattle, Michael,

But there are Wyards buried at Brundish, are there not ?

Actually, Brown's characterisation is both surprising and interesting, and as has already been noted, generally sympathetic. From what I gather, Dan Brown does NOT LIKE the Church, especially the RC Church; regards it as the Evil Empire par excellence, therefore, he'd be inclined to regard AC as one of it's renegade antagonists and targeted victims.

Angel or Demon ?

Best Wishes - S.A.


The Children of Transgression are the Dragons of the Law.


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2375
16/12/2009 8:49 pm  

because quasi also means 'having some of the qualities of, but not all' can we also safely assume that when Grant says Against the Light is quasi-autobiographical that he means there is also some truth in it from his past?
i am very curious on this michael.
thanks!
and ps i wrote starfire an email about Magical Revival and its publishing i just wanted to make sure you got it?


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
17/12/2009 6:23 pm  

Dan Brown's re-hashed brownies ? - for Al's snake read the source material he ripped off.
Maybe he is opening minds but I doubt it. Who gives a flying f**k about anything except the X factor, Strictly Come Dancing, Coronation Street, Eastenders, American Sh*t etc in the populous ?
The slaves shall serve.
Television - weapon of mass distraction.


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