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White Stains: & The Nameless Novel (FORBIDDEN EROTIC CLASSICS) [Paperback]  

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ptoner
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15/02/2013 1:59 pm  

This seems to have slipped through the net, do not recall it being mentioned on the Forums as being released. Can be bought for a very competitive price. Search on ABEBooks.

White Stains: & The Nameless Novel (FORBIDDEN EROTIC CLASSICS) [Paperback]
Aleister Crowley (Author), D.M. Mitchell (Introduction)

Publication Date: June 30, 2012 | Series: FORBIDDEN EROTIC CLASSICS

White Stains remains Aleister Crowley's most infamous work, his attempt at taking the Satanic/erotic decadencee of Baudelaire and ramping it up to new extremes of degradation, sexual depravity and demonic frenzy. Revelling in filth, Crowley includes odes to sodomy, fellatio, cunnilingus, analingus, rape, lesbianism, impotence, venereal disease, bestiality, sado-masochism, coprophilia, necrophila, blasphemy and devil-worship in this staggering, over-the-top compendium of eros and evil. This first US edition of White Stains also includes Crowley's rare later volume, The Nameless Novel (1904), a rampant pornographic novella written to stimulate and amuse his wife. With a new introduction by Crowley scholar D M Mitchell, the book is a classic document of fin-de-siècle erotica, as well as a unique compendium of Crowley's most outrageous and notorious literary output. New edition with new cover. First in a new series, Forbidden Erotic Classics, dedicated to literary works which were censored, suppressed or even prosecuted upon their original publication.

http://www.amazon.com/White-Stains-Nameless-FORBIDDEN-CLASSICS/dp/1902588916


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jamie barter
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15/02/2013 3:05 pm  

I can't recall The Nameless Novel ever having been made available anywhere else - might anyone know anything further of its publishing history, or of reviews, or perhaps more importantly, whether it is any good?  Also, was that actually its "proper title", given to it by Crowley, or the publisher's description?

Nor can I recall White Stains as being "new extremes of degradation, sexual depravity and demonic frenzy.  Revelling in filth [etc]" - these days, its contents seem relatively tame (although I have not looked at it for about 20 years, so I could always be mistaken.  Don't think so though!)

Yours meditatively
Norma N. Joy Conquest


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belmurru
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15/02/2013 3:15 pm  
"jamie barter" wrote:
I can't recall The Nameless Novel ever having been made available anywhere else - might anyone know anything further of its publishing history, or of reviews, or perhaps more importantly, whether it is any good?  Also, was that actually its "proper title", given to it by Crowley, or the publisher's description?

"The Nameless Novel" was published as the first part of Snowdrops from a Curate's Garden. The title surely comes from Crowley himself.

Nor can I recall White Stains as being "new extremes of degradation, sexual depravity and demonic frenzy.  Revelling in filth [etc]" - these days, its contents seem relatively tame (although I have not looked at it for about 20 years, so I could always be mistaken.  Don't think so though!)

I agree, Snowdrops takes that prize, along with Leah Sublime. I wonder about characterizing any of Crowley's explicit sex writings as "erotica" though.


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William Thirteen
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15/02/2013 3:16 pm  

BOOM!

Thanks Paul, it's on its way to my stiff little fingers.

hmmm...seems The Nameless Novel was first published in 1904, which would ostensibly make Rose the object of its sinful stimulation and obscene amusement. Unless RTC has some hitherto undiscovered information which will 'blow' the lid off this outrageous filth!


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jamie barter
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15/02/2013 5:34 pm  

Ah! I wasn't aware, or else may have forgotten, that "The Nameless Novel" was part of Snowdrops....  Many thanks, Belmurru, and to ptoner also for notifying it in the first place!

N. Joy


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lashtal
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15/02/2013 11:33 pm  
"WilliamThirteen" wrote:
The Nameless Novel was first published in 1904, which would ostensibly make Rose the object of its sinful stimulation and obscene amusement. Unless RTC has some hitherto undiscovered information which will 'blow' the lid off this outrageous filth!

Not sure about that, but William Breeze managed to cram a number of very surprising pieces of information in his introduction to the beautiful little Ebba (Stockholm, 2011) edition of White Stains. These include the identity of AC's New Year's Eve 1896 male lover and the full extent of AC's friendship with Oscar Eckenstein.

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 Anonymous
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16/02/2013 12:09 am  

93

Teitan Press published very good edition of Snowdrops in 1986.

It seems that White Stains: & The Nameless Novel is nothing new on the market.
I saw its previous printing couple years ago. Here is the link to the edition from 2009:
http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/White-Stains-Nameless-Novel-Aleister-Crowley/9781902588704

93 93/93
Krzysztof


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alysa
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16/02/2013 12:17 am  

Little Ebba (Stockholm 2011) Paul, would you please provide us with some more details regarding this "Little Ebba", is it published in the Swedish language for example, where can one possibly buy it from (or is it already out of print?) I think I never heard or read anything about "Little Ebba" before . . . 


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ptoner
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16/02/2013 12:25 am  

As far as I know the standard run is now out of print and a few deluxe illustrated editions left.
Will see if I can find the link.

EDIT: http://www.edda.se/

under catalogue section at the top. Maybe you can try a distributor for a copy.

extract

Edited and with an introduction by William Breeze. Illustrated by Fredrik Söderberg.

English poet-magician Aleister Crowley published White Stains in 1898, an era of intense creativity for the budding magus-to-be. The original edition of a mere 100 copies was printed in Amsterdam with the help of Leonard Smithers (publisher of Beardsley, Wilde, Burton et al). Part of the edition was later “appropriated” and destroyed by English Customs officers, due to the erotic nature of the poems. In a Victorian Zeitgeist that found Oscar Wilde intensely shocking, Aleister Crowley of course took everything one step further. The virile sexual force stemming from Crowley’s pen is but one of his trademark traits here. In this early collection, we also find examples of his remarkable wit, a thorough understanding of psycho-sexual dynamics, bombastic expressions of lyrical love, as well as his beloved Swinburnean structures of classical poetry. White Stains really is Crowley at his youthful best.

This edition contains six stunning watercolour paintings by Fredrik Söderberg, reproduced in full colour. Here's an example from the book:

Edda Bok, 2011. Hardbound book with dustjacket, 128 pages, 11 x 18 cm. Limited edition of 418 numbered copies. Release date: September 9, 2011.

Please note: Edda HQ has no more copies of this book. We consider it sold out. If you're lucky, you might be able to get your hands on a copy through our international distributors – please see the ordering section. Thank you.

A SPECIAL LIMITED ART EDITION OF WHITE STAINS IS AVAILABLE:

The first 43 copies of the book (signed by Carl Abrahamsson and Fredrik Söderberg) come in a slipcase, together with a signed silkscreen print (only 43 made) by Fredrik Söderberg. The image is 16 x 23 cm, the sheet is 19 x 25 cm. It's printed in blue and gold on 300 g Arches 88 paper stock:

Price: 1500 SEK per set (one set per customer only)
Postage: Europe – 170 SEK, Rest of the world – 180 SEK (sent by registered mail only)

VERY FEW COPIES LEFT!

PLEASE NOTE: This limited art edition of White Stains IS AVAILABLE TO CUSTOMERS ALL OVER THE WORLD, INCLUDING THE USA.

Would YOU like to be informed about new releases and other additions to the list? Would YOU like to sell future volumes and our other upcoming titles in other cities / countries / regions of the world? Contact: [ edda AT edda DOT se ]


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lashtal
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16/02/2013 12:40 am  

'Little' as in 'Not very big'... Thanks, Paul, for correcting my 'Ebba'/'Edda' typo!

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alysa
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16/02/2013 1:04 am  

www.edda.se,  think I read about them before, thanks, PT.


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jamie barter
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16/02/2013 12:18 pm  

This thread got me thinking and digging out my copies of those "three bad books" - White Stains, Snowdrops & The Scented Garden of Abdullah (Bagh-i-Muattur), all of which signally failed to arouse me very much, either aesthetically by their verse, I'm afraid to say, or more organically (as it were).

It seems incredible to contemplate they were xxx-rated material in their day, although they were of course culturally far different times.  But to state as the publisher does in their blurb, that White Stains "remains" Crowley's "most infamous work" & that it is "staggering, over-the-top" is patently quite absurd, even in comparison with the other two and Not the Life & Adventures of Sir Roger Bloxam, which might arguably also qualify - but as belmurru rightly remarks I think Leah Sublime would stand out rampantly as the clear lead contender, short of length though it is (although size isn't everything, of course).

However, John Symonds points out in his Introduction to White Stains (p. xv) that "it was not [A.C.'s] first lubricious book" [what a lovely onomatopoeic word that is!] - and in Confessions, Crowley also said:

"[Green Alps] was never published.  I had paid Leonard Smithers to have it printed and he told me that the printers' works had been destroyed by fire, which may or may not have been the case... I had a complete set of proofs, but I had become rather ashamed of the book" (- which of course makes it all seem rather alluring and enticing, but unfortunately he may just be referring to the quality of the verse/ prose rather than any more, ahem, stimulating element.)  He went on to add: "The collection was marked by a tendency to earthly passion and its title shows that I already regarded human love as an idea to be transcended."

I'm therefore wondering if Green Alps was ever published, and if so when, where & by whom.  Failing this, where the "complete set" of proofs may have ended up - there must surely at least be a copy in the Warburg, if anywhere, although I haven't so far checked their catalogue.  Maybe someone else could kindly provide some further information?

Fnarr, fnarr, wrowf, fnarr, slobber slobber, pant, unghh - hriliu!
N. Joy


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lashtal
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16/02/2013 3:26 pm  
"jamie barter" wrote:
I'm therefore wondering if Green Alps was ever published, and if so when, where & by whom.  Failing this, where the "complete set" of proofs may have ended up - there must surely at least be a copy in the Warburg, if anywhere, although I haven't so far checked their catalogue.  Maybe someone else could kindly provide some further information?

The only surviving pages (25 or so) are in Yorke OSG1, which is included in the OTO Yorke microfilms. Some of the contents were included in Oracles.

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jamie barter
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18/02/2013 5:25 pm  

Thanks Paul.  Green Alps certainly appears to be one of the more obscure books in the Crowley oeuvre, with a full version of it as one of the very few books left never to have been published or made available in some form elsewhere.  In view of its age I would have thought it might be exempt from copyright issues, but these days it is very difficult to tell the exact legal position & that may be what has deterred any smaller publishers from taking a risk. 

Also as it now appears that only part of it is available instead of the “complete set of proofs”, it makes one wonder what could have happened to the remainder.  Since A.C. himself did not appear to regard it as worth trying to publish again after his initial effort and didn’t really ‘talk it up’ much later (e.g., in his Confessions) either, it may not be worth investigating the book a lot further when similar research could be made into his other obscure works more profitably.  Nonetheless it remains a curiosity.

Yours bibliophilishly,
N. Joy


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Michael Staley
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18/02/2013 5:43 pm  
"jamie barter" wrote:
In view of its age I would have thought it might be exempt from copyright issues, but these days it is very difficult to tell the exact legal position & that may be what has deterred any smaller publishers from taking a risk.

The copyright position is variable depending on where published. For instance, in the UK all works are covered by copyright until 70 years after the author's death. In the USA any work published before 1923 is considered in the public domain.

Though the copyright issues are complex (there are I believe some caveats to the basic positions outlined above, as the actress said to the bishop), it's a good idea to consult the opinion of someone expert in intellectual property law.


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lashtal
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18/02/2013 8:23 pm  

Having read the surviving pages of Green Alps, I can assure you I'd be far, far more interested in reading a properly edited and annotated edition of Not the Life & Adventures of Sir Roger Bloxam. The extracts I've seen of that work are genuinely rather interesting and ahead of their time.

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jamie barter
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19/02/2013 5:11 pm  

C.O.T.O.’s “The Magical Link” serialized (such) a version of Not the Life… over several instalments back in the early 1990s, but I don’t have my copies to hand at present to check & am not aware they printed it elsewhere nor sanctioned anyone else to be able to duplicate it…

N. Joy


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