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Aleister Crowley; the man, the mage, the poet. Cammell  

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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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07/02/2011 6:44 pm  

Dear all
Has anyone read this bio of Old Crow by his friend later in life? If so do you think it is worth a read or purchase? I remember he knew him in London during the blitz, so I was hoping there was some interesting stories of his later life.
Merely curious. Thank you in advance for any possible responses!


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lashtal
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07/02/2011 7:01 pm  

Yes, it's delightful.

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alysa
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07/02/2011 7:09 pm  

I read that little charming bio a year of eight ago, and must say it is sympathetic towards Crowley, it is not so expensive if you would want to buy it, it quite surprised me that the bio made such an interesting turn, as (almost) at the end of the bio, Crowley turned out not sympathetic anymore towards Charles Richard Cammel, for what reason I would like to know.


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lashtal
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07/02/2011 7:11 pm  

... because Cammell believed that AC had caused Mrs Cammell real offence. The tweed incident.

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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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07/02/2011 7:28 pm  

Greetings

"lashtal" wrote:
... because Cammell believed that AC had caused Mrs Cammell real offence. The tweed incident.

"The tweed incident"?


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OKontrair
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07/02/2011 7:55 pm  

During WWII many things were rationed including cloth. Mrs Cammell did some home based weaving of high quality woolen cloth called tweed. AC was given some to sell on her behalf but did not hand over the money. When asked he wrote what was probably a stinky letter. Cammel ignored him in the street and this ended a long term friendship between them.

The book is a rebuttal to Symond's Great Beast which CRC thought unfair. There is a good bibliography in the back.

The hardback has some good photos (which you've probably seen) and the biblio. There is a paperback called 'Aleister Crowley, Black Magician' which is the same book but less the photos and I think the bibliography.

OK


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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07/02/2011 8:13 pm  

AC in that time had a notorious bright tweed suit. I wonder if he had it made from that cloth. Just an idea.
I remember reading about it in McMurty's recollections. Thanks for the info everyone, I will definitely read this one 🙂
Sadly I think you can count on one hand the amount of friends Crowley still had after a few years of knowing them. But I am not one to talk sometimes I get tired of people too.


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lashtal
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07/02/2011 8:19 pm  

When I was a teenager just getting "into" Crowley, my younger brother (81 on this site) saw the paperback for sale on a secondhand books Market stall. When I mentioned later that I'd have liked it he cycled the ten mile round trip to buy it for me. It cost him a week's pocket money. Of such memories and gratitude are life made worth the living.

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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
07/02/2011 9:26 pm  

Greetings

"OKontrair" wrote:
During WWII many things were rationed including cloth. Mrs Cammell did some home based weaving of high quality woolen cloth called tweed. AC was given some to sell on her behalf but did not hand over the money. When asked he wrote what was probably a stinky letter. Cammel ignored him in the street and this ended a long term

Thank you, O’Kontrair!

"lashtal" wrote:
When I was a teenager just getting "into" Crowley, my younger brother (81 on this site) saw the paperback for sale on a secondhand books Market stall.

“81” mystery solved. 🙂

H_ _ _ _e


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michaelclarke18
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07/02/2011 9:40 pm  

my younger brother (81 on this site) saw the paperback for sale on a secondhand books Market stall. When I mentioned later that I'd have liked it he cycled the ten mile round trip to buy it for me. It cost him a week's pocket money. Of such memories and gratitude are life made worth the living.

What a nice story.


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