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Beginner to Magick - Which books to truly understand?


 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
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Hi, I'm fairly new to Magick - I've been interested for many years and have a small occult book collection. I'm definately a bit of a bibliophile and I'm looking for a new aquisition. I have the 'complete golden dawn system of magic' and also Levi's 'History of Magick - this cost me a fortune' and I found it quite a bore! Let me know which should be my latest aquisition. I feel that I need a complete (user friendly) explanation of Magick!


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the_real_simon_iff
(@the_real_simon_iff)
Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1907
 

93, AKASHA...

If you are interested in this one (should match both "bibliophile" and "explanation of Magick") http://www.lashtal.com/nuke/module-pnMediaLibrary-display-id-278.phtml you are invited to make me a serious (you might check out other editions of that work on the web first) offer via P.M.

Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

93
Have you tried "Magick Without Tears?" A first edition is usually not too exorbitant, and it is Crowley's most accessible work (in my opinion), definitely geared for the less experienced.
93/93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Why not begin with "Magick: Book 4 Parts I-IV" aka Liber ABA? In all honesty, it may take a few books before you really grasp the idea... If you've read Golden Dawn though, then I would think that Liber ABA would be all that you need... alas, if you really desire to Fully grasp the workings of A.C., you may end up deciding that you wish to begin with "The Equinox Vol. I, Nos. 1-10", and work your way through all of the Equinoxes. It all depends on your intents and desires, what you should read...


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Hi, I would reccomend 2 books by W. E. Butler: "Magic Its Ritual, Power and Purpose" & "The Magician: his Training and Work". You should be able to get the 2 for 20 quid.
Nick.


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Walterfive
(@walterfive)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 856
 

I agree with the reccomendation of "Magick/Book 4/Liber ABA" and suggest "Gems From The Equinox" as a companion volume. Enough in those two volumes to keep a student busy for *years*...


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 
"Petros" wrote:
93
Have you tried "Magick Without Tears?" A first edition is usually not too exorbitant, and it is Crowley's most accessible work (in my opinion), definitely geared for the less experienced.
93/93

A first not too exorbitant ! ! There is a copy on abe at present but it will set you back $2.000 - Nick


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

The Divine Pymander and the Kybalion. Hermes Trismegistus


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ZIN
 ZIN
(@zin)
Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 82
 

Start by reading the history of Magic and Magicians : the middle-ages and up. When you have digested this then get into your GOLDEN DAWN material. When you feel comfortable with this portion of your studies then enter into Crowley's MAGICK. As you progress let Kenneth Grant take you onward. Time and patience are of the essence. These suggestions are just the beginnings. You seem to be on the right track...


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Magick in Theory and Practice, including books 1, 2, 3 is in my opinion one of the best books on ceremonial magick of all time. 777 and other Qabalistic writings of Aleister Crowley is equally invaluable, Gems From the Equinox as well, but in many cases the Equinox can be found online. The Book of Thoth is highly recommended. Levi's Transcendental Magic, The Golden Dawn by Regardie.
I found Butler's books highly informative but dry.
An excellent modern book on magick would be Visual Magick by Jan Fries.


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