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Holiday plans: Magick places in London and Paris


 Anonymous
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I'll travel to London and Paris for the first time on July. I'm wondering if you know places worth visiting there for someone interested in Magick.

I'll probably spend at least one day in British Museum and there at least the Egyptian and Roman sections. What else? I've heard they have some original copies of important books in Magick, is it possible to see these?

I'm also interested in occult/magick shops there, especially since I live in Helsinki of Finland and we don't have many shops that specialize on such subjects.

At least this bookstore looks interesting and it's even next to the British Museum: http://www.theatlantisbookshop.com/

I'd be grateful for any suggestions!


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 Anonymous
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My first suggestion would be Treadwells. Great books, great people always ready to help you further and suggest the occult hot spots to you. They have great talks as well if you are interested.
http://www.treadwells-london.com/

Watkins Books is a good place as well. http://www.watkinsbooks.com/

So much for my 5 cents,

best,

David


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ianrons
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The British Museum collection is now at the British Library (http://www.bl.u k"> http://www.bl.uk ), but unless you're British or have academic reasons to visit, you won't be able to use the reading rooms. However, the British Museum does have tons of great exhibits, including Egyptian. There's also the Petrie Museum (part of University College London) that has open access to Egyptian exhibits. If you're at Treadwell's for TauMelchizedek's talk on the 12th of July (which I'll be attending) then please do introduce yourself.


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the_real_simon_iff
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93!

If you are interested in Aleister Crowley you might want to check out his portrait in the National Portrait Gallery at Trafalgar Square. The painting: "Edward Alexander ('Aleister') Crowley by Leon Engers Kennedy, oil on canvas, 1917-18, On display in Room 31 at the National Portrait Gallery" is a lot more striking, colourful and fascinating than any reproduction. This event costs just 30 to 60 minutes and Trafalgar Square is also easily reachable by foot when you are in the center (British Museum, Soho etc.). I at least can recommend it from an artistic standpoint, it is not idol worshipping at all.

http://www.npg.org.uk/live/opening.asp

Love=Law
Lutz


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James
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You could download the Christina Oakley talk on Aleister Crowley's London from the Lashtal download section for a visit to places of Crowleyian interest. He stayed in a lot of places so theres plenty of them. She also give the address for the meeting place of the Golden Dawn.

If you are interested in Austin Spare then there are a few of his places and pubs where he frequented. You can either look them up in Zos Speaks or see my film 'Spare Places' again a download from this site or to view on YouTube (just put in the title to search). There is/was? a Spare self-portrait in the Victoria & Albert museum - I think it was reported on Lashtal some years ago????

A trip to Mortlake is nice and is where Dr John Dee lived and had his famous library. However his house is no longer there and I'm not sure of the site of it (don't think it is known - unless anyone else here can say?).

Again I would endorse Treadwells because Christina (the owner), can give you lots of information about Occult London as she has done talks and walks around the capitol.

The British musuem also has, in its Elizabethen collection the equipment John Dee and Edward Kelly used for their Enochian operations including the wax tablets.

The Atlantis bookshop on Museum St. just opposite the British museum is also worth a visit. Frequented by Crowley, Spare and others before and since.

Watkins bookshop in Cecil Court just off St. Martin's Lane near Trafalgar sq. is the other prominant bookshop.

You might also find the Freud museum near Hampstead/Swiss Cottage of interest for its antiquarian artifacts.

Finally for a New Age-y/Goth/ vaguely occult couple of hours then Camden Lock Market over a w/e (esp. Sunday) is also fun. If you turn right out of the right hand exit at Camden Tube station and walk up to the bridge turning left just before it then you come to the main markets. There is also plenty of good eating places there too. Gilgamesh is particularly good (if a bit pricey but hey! this is London), you can look at its marvellously carved wooden reliefs of the Gilgamesh Epic in Mesopotamian style whilst you wait for the slightly snooty staff to serve you!

Enjoy your trip!

Jamie 😀


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Go see St. Pauls, it built on the site of what used to be a temple to Diana. Or Westminster Cathedral, on an old sit of a temple to Anubis. Go see any of the Hawksmoor churches, theres one about 3 minutes from the British Museum, another in Trafalgar Square but the best and most terrifying is Christchurch in Spitalfields. Don't forget a trip to Cleopatras Needle by the Thames either, do some research and find out the bizarre things buried beneath it. Go to the Bank of England if you happen to be nearby and check out the stone from Solomons Temple visible in the side wall on the outside. Take in the Centrepoint building (its very high) from most vantage points in London, Ken Grant claims that Mathers used to conduct rituals on the site and the tower is an echoing phallic thrust from those workings. I could go and on.... 😀


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James
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Loscult - There isn't a Hawksmoor church near Trafalgar Square - to my knowledge? His churches are:

St. Georges Bloomsbury (near British Museum),
St. Mary Woolnoth - Bank
St. George in the East - Wapping
St Anne's at Limehouse
St. Alfege at Greenwich
plus two momument one at St. Luke's on Old Street and then St. John's Horselydown on the south side of the Thames which no longer exists.

The stone I think you are refering to is 'London stone' which is opposite Cannon St. Tube station and not in the Bank of England.
Regards,


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 Anonymous
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Sorry confused Gibb due to the Wren connection on St martin in the Fields. And youre correct about the Stone, again confused it with the Church it was once set in, although the Bank of England did have something in its side which I must now go and look up...

But the best Hawksmoor worth visiting still remains Christchurch


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ianrons
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Can't be sure from just satellite imagery, but I'm 99% sure this is the location of Dee's house in Mortlake, slap bang in the middle of the picture there.


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James
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Loscult - I agree Christchurch is the best Hawksmoor church it has recently been renovated and is wonderful inside. It is located just opposite what was Dorset St. the place of Jack the Ripper's last victim Mary Kelly. All very spooky!

Hello Ian - Do you have a reference for Dee's house, I've been trying to find it for some time (shows I should have asked here first!). Is this the site of Weaver's Factory just down the road from Mortlake Brewery?


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faustian
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In Paris, there used to be a place called the "La Table d'émeraude" in the Latin Quarter - the French equivalent of the Atlantis Bookshop. It was on Rue de la Huchette, but I believe that it has closed down in recent years.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Wow, you guys are a lot more helpful than the "Rough Guide to Britain" I bought. I wasn't expecting this many suggestions.

I think I'll visit at least the bookstores of Atlantis and Treadwells. It's interesting that TauMelchizedek is giving a talk on 12th of July, I can perhaps attend that (I'm leaving to France on 13th). Both of these seem absolutely great.

My hotel is at Russell Square which should be quite close to at least British Museum and Atlantis. I picked the hotel somewhat at random - I didn't know where Russell Square is - but it seems I chose a convenient location.

Thanks for all these suggestions, I'll definitely return to them many times while planning where to go.


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AbulDiz
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93!

You can get a free tour of Freemasons United Grand Lodge in Queen Street which is a five minute walk from Watkins, i think they run every hour through the day and the temple alone is well worth the effort. There is also a masonic museum and a few masonic shops on the same street selling books of interest to Thelemites, Franz Bardon et tal.

There is a New Age shop in Neals Yard that has a reasonably good stock of esoteric books amongst the fluff.

Dont forget Waterstones Piccadily and any Borders you can find, they often have a designated 'Occult' section aside from Mind, Body, Spirit.

93's.

AbulDiz.


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faustian
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Paris lacks the Occult appeal of London. Perhaps the school of the Martiniste never had the same sex appeal as the Order of the Golden Dawn. No the English have the French beat in this department. This is what I know.

1. There is a branch of the OTO somewhere in 17th near the Place Clichy - it's been many years.

2. There is always the Theosophical Society on Rue De Rapp in the 7th. Interesting lectures on Wednesday, good bookstore.

3. The AMORC has a location near the Pompidou Center.

I hope this was useful.

Yours Truly Faustian


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faustian
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Last but not least, while in France, you could always stop by and visit Rennes Le Chateau near Toulouse.


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 Anonymous
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This is a great thread!

When in London one of the standard things to visit in the BM is of course the shewing stone and the pantacles of doctor D.

Noxlux


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 Anonymous
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"noxlux" wrote:
This is a great thread!

When in London one of the standard things to visit in the BM is of course the shewing stone and the pantacles of doctor D.

Yeah, I spent a day in British Museum but missed Dr Dee. They're not very easy to find accidentally. However, I happened to buy one of the guide books to British Museum and lazily browsing through it at hotel, I suddenly noticed the book also describes some of Dee's stuff!

Needless to say, since I lived right next to the Museum and the entrance was free, the next day I walked in again to find Dee's stuff. I showed the picture to a lady at info, she thought for a moment and finally said "Oh, those things, they were here some months ago in an exhibition but now they're gone." I thought "bummer" and went walking around the Egyptian area.

Then I looked again at my guide book and it still said that British Museum has Dee's stuff. The guide book was several years old, but it still felt strange that there'd be a special exhibition of stuff that has just been in the regular collection. So I decided to walk to the English area in the top floors and finally asked an old man if he has Dee's pantacles. He looked at the picture for a while and then said "Oh, I think we had some stuff around here..." He leads me across the room. "They were right here in this cabinet...", he says, but now the cabinet has just some random pots or whatever. Bummer. Then he goes on: ".. but you can go to Enlightenment room 1 at first floor, there you'll find some of Dee's stuff".

Wow! They really were in the Enlightenment room! It was quite interesting to inspect his Pantacle, I had only seen a copy of its inscription in Liber ABA but I didn't even know what material it was made of.


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 Anonymous
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Correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't Dee's scrying stone stolen from the BM by some guy in a black trenchcoat a few years ago?

Since he probably posts on here, may I take opportunity to say:

Thanks a lot for ruining that for everyone. You idiot.

Oh, and if you're staying in Bloomsbury then you need to go book shopping and you also need to check out the exhibited books of the British Library. Original Alice In Wonderland, Joyce's notebooks, very old Korans, Torahs, a ton of bibles, I get dizzy just thinking about it.

Oh, and if you need a breather near the Square, try Worburn Walk, just off Duke Street.

Good cup of tea, and Yeats lived there. Discounts for students.


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lashtal
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"Informutation" wrote:
Correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't Dee's scrying stone stolen from the BM by some guy in a black trenchcoat a few years ago?

Since he probably posts on here, may I take opportunity to say:

Thanks a lot for ruining that for everyone. You idiot.

A rare 16th Century clairvoyance crystal and valuable documents were snatched in a daylight raid on a gallery at the Science Museum, it was confirmed today. The irreplaceable artefacts were taken at around 4.30pm yesterday, when thieves smashed a glass cabinet in an exhibition space on the fifth floor of the building in in South Kensington, London. Museum staff have launched an internal inquiry, but do not yet know if the raiders were specifically targeting the items, estimated to be worth around £50,000. The crystal, used as a tool by mediums and for curing disease, belonged to maverick philosopher, mathematician and astrologer John Dee, a consultant to Elizabeth I.

December 2004: http://www.lashtal.com/nuke/Article357.phtml

I recall being well and truly lost for words on reading Alastrum's comment to that news item: "It has clearly been taken by someone who knows exactly what it is and how to use it, and in a perverse way I'm actually pleased that it may well be used again for the purpose for which it was constructed." Unbelievable!

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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 Anonymous
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Was that never recovered ? I wonder where it is now.


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 Anonymous
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"BlueKephra" wrote:
Was that never recovered ? I wonder where it is now.

Apparently it was recovered soon after.

This is from comments to those Lasthal news:


by ianrons on Aug 08, 2005 - 05:42 PM

The thief was captured and the crystal returned; and BTW the crystal is almost certainly a fake, based upon the accompanying "Culpeper manuscript", which is supposed to authenticate it.


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 Anonymous
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Not strictly magick related - as far as I know - but I recommend it to anyone going to London because it's one my my favourite places, The John Soane Museum.

http://www.soane.org/

In Paris, the Gustave Moreau Museum

http://www.musee-moreau.fr/homes/home_id24501_u1l2.htm


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 Anonymous
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"Informutation" wrote:
the exhibited books of the British Library. Original Alice In Wonderland, Joyce's notebooks, very old Korans, Torahs, a ton of bibles,

Hear hear I never expected to see the codex sinaiticus for real!

The crowley portrait at the national gallery is way cooler than any reproduction.

Right now there is also the interesting Dali and film thingy at tate modern. Surrealism should be warm to the heart of any occultist. Of perchance a little interest is the movie about how Dali travels to high mongolia hunting for the 60 meter psychadelic mushroom / all pictures of this adventure being inscribed in the randomness of a brass band around his pen.

Oh, and if you check out john dee's stuff / there is that little gold thingy with four watchtowers which I imagine should be of some interest to practitioners of enochian magick.

n


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 Anonymous
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"noxlux" wrote:
Right now there is also the interesting Dali and film thingy at tate modern. Surrealism should be warm to the heart of any occultist. Of perchance a little interest is the movie about how Dali travels to high mongolia hunting for the 60 meter psychadelic mushroom / all pictures of this adventure being inscribed in the randomness of a brass band around his pen.

Yes, I also went to see the Dali & Film exhibition. Well worth a visit and the audioguides were worth their price.

Oh, and if you check out john dee's stuff / there is that little gold thingy with four watchtowers which I imagine should be of some interest to practitioners of enochian magick.

Some pictures I took of Dee's stuff in British Museum:


http://img508.imageshack.us/img508/756/39iv7.jp g">

Here, among other stuff, is that golden thing but unfortunately you can't see any details of the carvings on it. It also seems that there may be a spirit formulating in the black mirror. 🙂


http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/3293/img1034pa5.jp g">

Dee's Pantacle.


The note in British Museum says:

"Dr John Dee

This group of strange objects is associated with John dee (1527-1608/9), mathematician, astrologer and magician during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. A respected, if controversial, figure in his own lifetime, Dee is now best remembered for his experiments in conjuring up divine spirits using some of the objects displayed here.

Dr Dee's magic

A number of Dr Dee's materials came to the British Museum via the antiquary and collector Sir Robert Cotton (see case 5), who acquired them after Dee's death. The large wax disc, called the 'Seal of God' is engraved with magical names and symbols. Dee used it as a support for his 'shew-stones', in which medium allegedly saw visions of divine beings unveiling the secrets of the universe. The two smaller discs are said to have supported Dee's 'Table of Practice'. The golden disc is engraved with the so-called 'Vision of the Four Castles'. The black obsidian mirror, originally a Mexican Aztec cult object, was used for conjuring spirits. Its fitted case has a label in the hand Horace Walpole, the 18th century author and collector who once owned it."


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 Anonymous
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St. James's Church

Address 197 Piccadilly, W1

CONTAINS:

The font that William Blake was baptized in.

It's one of the most beautiful things in London.


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