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Ashdown Forest?


Shiva
(@shiva)
Not a Rajah
Joined: 14 years ago
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I think this subject might have been brought up before, but I cannot really remember if this is so.

Peter Moon's book, The Black Sun, says Crowley did a ritual in Ashdown forest in 1941 designed to bring Rudolph Hess to England/Scotland.

Does anybody know (any facts) about this claim?

And where is Ashdown Forest?

Here's the whole page if you want some context ...


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ignant666
(@ignant666)
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Joined: 16 years ago
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashdown_Forest

The pages are obviously the product of a floridly insane person (the author) who is eager to believe things told him by other, equally insane people. Notice that no evidence is provided for any claim made. Minor point: families are not members of the Daughters of the American Revolution; individual women are. My mom was the DAR Regent for her county at one point. Sumerian snake deities were not a big concern at their meetings.

The usual claim about magick rituals during WW II is that Wiccans participated in a ritual in the New Forest to defeat Hitler in 1940. This claim is made by Gardner in his Witchcraft Today.

The claim about AC and Ashdown Forest is rooted in claims by the fantasist "Amado Crowley":

Amado Crowley wrote that the ritual described by Gardner was a fiction based on a real wartime ritual carried out by his father, which he had witnessed as a boy. He claimed that this ritual, dubbed Operation Mistletoe, had taken place in the Ashdown Forest in Sussex in early 1941, with a detachment of Canadian soldiers dressed in wizardly robes and a dummy in Nazi uniform seated on a throne.

See generally https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/86145/operation-cone-power-when-british-witches-attacked-adolf-hitler , which is the source i am quoting re "Amado".


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Shiva
(@shiva)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 6156
Topic starter  
Posted by: @ignant666

The claim about AC and Ashdown Forest is rooted in claims by the fantasist "Amado Crowley":

I remember him. He sponsored a long, long thread that developed into Christianity versus Thelema. The Christian lady, Barbara by name, said Amado was possessed  ... and she saw a dark thing fly out of him. Possessed, you hear? It's hard to trust anybody these days.


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