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Corey Taylor on "True Will"  

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kidneyhawk
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01/12/2011 4:22 am  

I just watched the first two parts of Corey Taylor's presentation at Oxford. For those who don't know, Taylor is the vocalist for Slipknot and Stone Sour.

I was amazed as I listened to this talk. He doesn't mention Crowley, Thelema or any of the terminology that is familiar to us all when discussing "True Will" on these forums. Despite this, he delivers a wonderfully succinct statement which-IMO-captures the essence of "Do What Thou Wilt." The gist of his talk is making a distinction between what you "love" and what you are "good at," emphasizing the utter importance of the latter for a life that is well lived and maximized in its potential. From the nature of each individual holding its own unique gifts to the following of the path of "least resistance," Taylor simplifies truths which were critical elements in the Message of the "Master Therion."

Whereas I have no need to impose any "Thelemite" status on Mr. Taylor, I think his talk is very relevant to several recent discussions here and is arguably a manifestation of the 93 Current in our present times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJp8gvq0heU


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 Anonymous
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01/12/2011 7:38 pm  
"kidneyhawk" wrote:
I was amazed as I listened to this talk. He doesn't mention Crowley, Thelema or any of the terminology that is familiar to us all when discussing "True Will" on these forums. Despite this, he delivers a wonderfully succinct statement which-IMO-captures the essence of "Do What Thou Wilt." The gist of his talk is making a distinction between what you "love" and what you are "good at," emphasizing the utter importance of the latter for a life that is well lived and maximized in its potential. From the nature of each individual holding its own unique gifts to the following of the path of "least resistance," Taylor simplifies truths which were critical elements in the Message of the "Master Therion."

Hey Kyle,

A very important and sorely neglected subject. I happen to think that artificial life goals, which run contrary to true Will and are mostly the result of thoughtless adherence to arbitrary convention, are the root of many, many evils. I will check out the link.


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kidneyhawk
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01/12/2011 8:12 pm  

"I happen to think that artificial life goals, which run contrary to true Will and are mostly the result of thoughtless adherence to arbitrary convention, are the root of many, many evils."

I fully and passionately agree with this. Although the topic (of True Will and its frustration in the modern world) is one worthy of considerable elaboration, I found this presentation to be a wonderful "brass tacks" introduction-esp. for the individual who may not have the aptitude or interest in a more detailed study and pursuit of this theme via Thelemic systems per se. It's upon this "rock," however, that the "church" is built.

It's also important, I think, to note how Mr. Taylor treats the theme of "success." This may or may not yield up certain results in the outward world but the path of least resistance (directed by one's Will, True Nature or what one is "good at" and has learned to "love") creates the best scenario for a life that is fulfilling on all levels. This is contrasted with the example of the bloke in the bar who can only grumble about his missed chances and ultimately becomes a subject of pity. He may have the outward "success" whereby he can afford to drown his sorrows each evening but he is inwardly bereft of the riches which are the birthright of his authentic self. 


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Michael Staley
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02/12/2011 11:21 pm  

I think that Crowley says somewhere that a Thelemite might never have heard of Thelema or Crowley, but still be following their True Will. Grant says something similar in Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God. I think that this is a current which has long existed, but which was amplified in the course of the Cairo Working.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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kidneyhawk
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03/12/2011 1:13 am  

"I think that this is a current which has long existed, but which was amplified in the course of the Cairo Working."

I agree and increasingly see this as being the case as time goes by. As I watched/listened to Taylor's talk, I found myself not only thinking "He's talking about Thelema!" but reflecting on how rapidly the world has changed since the reception of AL, resulting in such a message being delivered at Oxford and subsequently broadcast throughout the world. It demonstrates a rapidly expanding platform for the emergence of this paradigm, "old" though it may be.

Whereas this little talk is a positive and powerful encouragement to better grasp and move with one's fundamental nature, this same message would be (and has been) shut-down, repressed and persecuted in times past. In line with both Crowley and AL's declaration of a "New Aeon," I was also impressed that the basic themes were discussed without any appeal to dogma or a particular school claiming ownership over the ideas. This indicates Thelema as a Force of Nature steadily unveiling itself on a larger scale. This force was the center of Crowley's developments, growing through them as a type of vehicle.

It's my thought that this force (called here by the word Thelema) will be transmitted by vehicles that don't isolate themselves from other expressions of the same after the manner of "either/or" approaches to religion or philosophy. It's gaining in velocity through myriad manifestations.

I AM reluctant to pick personal favorites who have worked, fought and carved their self-directed path and christen them "Thelemites." The same power that manifested under this name for Crowley is ultimately beyond words and will wear "Star and star, system & system" as it Will.


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 Anonymous
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03/12/2011 11:17 pm  
"kidneyhawk" wrote:
Whereas this little talk is a positive and powerful encouragement to better grasp and move with one's fundamental nature, this same message would be (and has been) shut-down, repressed and persecuted in times past. 

It's important, I think, in light of this message, to remember that people tend to value that which they were raised to value. There are exceptions, but that is the rule. It's much easier to know oneself when one is raised to do so. There should be no need to find oneself, one should never have lost oneself in the first place. Much of 'initiation' is really recovery, at least at first. 


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amadan-De
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03/12/2011 11:45 pm  

Hmmm...
I will have to watch the talk, it sounds excellent (and I trust kidneyhawks taste) but..
am I reading you right that the thrust is that it is better to do what you are 'good at' than what you 'love'?
Not sure I agree with that, here's one reason why.
Not so long ago I worked for an energy company (in order to provide food, rent, etc. not because I wanted to).  Because I showed aptitude for dealing with difficult customers I fairly swiftly was moved from general call-centre dogsbody to dealing with Complaints and then because I was 'good' at that I was moved to High Level Complaints (one step from the ombudsman).  I no longer work there due to being invalided out because the unremitting stress and sheer grimness (you never get a positive comment in High Level Complaints) was negatively impacting on both my mental health and my family life.  I have worked outside in both sub-zero and blistering temperatures, worked a different set of hours every single day for weeks to avoid the tides, carried equipment miles by hand to get to remote sites, and watched machines cut mile after mile of trench for no return doing the work I 'love' (archaeology) and none of it caused me pain like this job that I was 'good at'.  Course I'm 'good at' archaeology too - but I needed a steady reliable income which neither commercial nor most research archaeology gives right now.
If by 'love' you mean the stuff an individual is taught to value (as per Camlion's comment above) I'd agree entirely but I don't use the word Love that lightly.  ;D
Off to watch the film..


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amadan-De
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04/12/2011 12:48 am  

Excellent film. Nice guy.
I feel the trick is to love the process and not the result of what you 'do' to avoid being misled.


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kidneyhawk
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04/12/2011 1:47 am  
"amadan-De" wrote:
I feel the trick is to love the process and not the result of what you 'do' to avoid being misled.

Which seems to be another way of expressing the approach of "Working without lust of result."  🙂

I'm glad you enjoyed the video(s). I shared this with my 14 year old son and hope it will open some conversation about values, life-goals and so on. It is entertaining and very accessible to anyone who is interested in the topic, asking only for an open mind and spirit to the possibilities in their life. That and some passion-fueled self reflection.

I think it's also an example of the "Promulgation of the Law" outside of organizational authority and prescribed method. Thelema's power and validity as a natural force flows into ready vehicles and expresses itself accordingly.

And being a Slipknot fan doesn't hurt, either.  😉


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 Anonymous
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04/12/2011 9:18 pm  
"kidneyhawk" wrote:
I shared this with my 14 year old son and hope it will open some conversation about values, life-goals and so on.

The little one who jumped in your lap to look at the computer at the homemade Procol Harum Felix the Cat video is 14 now?!


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amadan-De
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04/12/2011 9:27 pm  
"kidneyhawk" wrote:
"amadan-De" wrote:
I feel the trick is to love the process and not the result of what you 'do' to avoid being misled.

Which seems to be another way of expressing the approach of "Working without lust of result."  🙂

Zigackly! 😉

The only 'down-side' to the talk is that he is of course talking from a position of substantial commercial success - focussed on by the young lady introducing him even - so there is a risk of seeing that as a requirement for the realisation of ones essential nature, which of course it isn't.


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kidneyhawk
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04/12/2011 10:45 pm  
"amadan-De" wrote:
The only 'down-side' to the talk is that he is of course talking from a position of substantial commercial success - focussed on by the young lady introducing him even - so there is a risk of seeing that as a requirement for the realisation of ones essential nature, which of course it isn't.

I agree with this assessment, a-D. My initial anticipation of the topic (what you "love" vs. what you're "good at") had me thinking, somewhat romantically, "of course, love trumps talent." But there is a logic to Taylor's talk which shows how the former can be misleading and the latter indicative of the True Nature-which we will naturally come to love as we increasingly engage with it. Whether or not commercial success follows is a relative thing.

We can look at the example of William Blake, passionately following his True Will to the hilt-and dying in poverty and obscurity. Time proves his value but the thing is: he COULD have given his skills as an engraver to a much more lucrative and socially acceptable route. He didn't exactly take the path of "least resistance." However, we might observe that he DID take that path-relative to his most authentic self. The measure of success, even during his lifetime, was not accolades from the masses but a continuous inner communion with who and what he was, expressed industriously through his writing and art. Were Blake to have had no material worries and the regard of his fellows for mediocre works, I believe he would have inwardly grieved-and all the subsequent "riches" would be experienced as ultimately unsatisfying and hollow.

I DO think Taylor got at this when he talked about his personal commitment to music, whether before a crowd of 100,000 or alone in his basement, whether in the wake of Slipknot's fame and fortune or working "24/7" to support his passion. He identified something utterly crucial to his being in the world and embraced it.

It calls to mind my all-time favorite Killing Joke song "Struggle:"

"Understanding the meaning of struggle
Giving your whole life to a single passion
Which others may or may not
Consider obsolete

Like a rare flower
Seen by a few before it withers and dies
Seeing it all
All the way through the very end
Regardless..."

 


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kidneyhawk
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05/12/2011 12:04 am  
"Camlion" wrote:
The little one who jumped in your lap to look at the computer at the homemade Procol Harum Felix the Cat video is 14 now?!

I've got TWO little ones...only one isn't so little anymore!  🙂


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 Anonymous
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05/12/2011 1:57 am  
"kidneyhawk" wrote:
"Camlion" wrote:
The little one who jumped in your lap to look at the computer at the homemade Procol Harum Felix the Cat video is 14 now?!

I've got TWO little ones...only one isn't so little anymore!  🙂

Oh, good. That would be time flying by too fast. 😉


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frater-r
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09/02/2020 5:04 am  

Robert Assagioli - transpersonal psychologist - also talks / writes about True Will in a way that is obviously inspired by Aleister Crowley. In fact, one of his books, _The Act Of Will_ mentions 'True Will' often. His book titled _Psycho-synthesis_ offers even more parallels between Thelema and transpersonal psychology(his "realization of True Self" comports with the Thelemic idea K&C of HGA, his psychosynthesis is basically purifying and reintegrating the elemental portions of the mind(such as happens in the grades below Tiphareth, etc. etc.)


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