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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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26/06/2011 8:54 pm  

( Apologies if this question has been answered elsewhere, or if this should be in a different part of the forums. )

We have lots of information about books he read and what he thought about those.

But what do we know about Crowley's cinema-going life?

What films did he see and what did he think of them?

Kind regards
N.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
26/06/2011 8:59 pm  
"Noctifer" wrote:
( Apologies if this question has been answered elsewhere, or if this should be in a different part of the forums. )

We have lots of information about books he read and what he thought about those.

But what do we know about Crowley's cinema-going life?

What films did he see and what did he think of them?

Kind regards
N.

I think I read somewhere that he had enjoyed Chaplin's shows. But I'm sure more knowledgeable of the folk around here know more.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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26/06/2011 9:32 pm  

Thanks anpi. I seem to remember Kenneth Grant may have mentioned Crowley's appreciation of Chaplin somewhere or other, I may be mistaken.

I suppose I particularly wonder about his time in Berlin, whether he saw any of the Expressionist films, things we now regard as classics of 'wierd' cinema.


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OKontrair
(@okontrair)
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26/06/2011 9:41 pm  

He was particularly fond of A Night to Remember about the sinking of the Titanic. The first four times he saw it alone, then he went with Frieda Harris and the sixth time he went it was with Cath[erine Faulkner]. He found it funny. After the outing with Frieda he described himself as "still drenched with laughter." This was in May and June 1943.

He often spoke ill of British films and well of American ones. He usually made up his mind in minutes and walked out if he wasn't enjoying it.

In April that year he records seeing Brighton Rock with Richard Attenborough in it. I thought that was too early for the film and checked. What AC saw was the play which also starred RA. AC suggests a better ending and if memory serves me rightly the film did have his preferred ending.

Next day, 14th April: "Saw Watch on the Rhine as dreary for the most part as, for the most part, most watches are. The story didn’t start at all till the middle of Act 2. The dialogue wasn’t too brilliant, either."

Next day 15th April: "Saw Derriere la Facade again. It improves every time: one picks up fine points previously missed. Superb—beyond all praise: not a dull second."

On Sunday the 18th: "Saw The Story of Stalingrad absolutely first-class, bar some poor (hurried, unintelligible) photography. Escaped in time to avoid debauch of English snobbery & hypocrisy:- “Royal Colonel (a German Jewish wench!) salutes Guards”; “The Archbishop blesses Bo[mber] Command” and so on. Alert 10.22. Guns 10.33 RP 10.40."

The stuff he avoids are disagreeable patriotic shorts and the numbers at the end relate to a (real) air raid warning.

So he definitely liked cinema going.

OK


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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26/06/2011 9:53 pm  
"OKontrair" wrote:
He was particularly fond of A Night to Remember about the sinking of the Titanic. The first four times he saw it alone, then he went with Frieda Harris and the sixth time he went it was with Cath[erine Faulkner]. He found it funny. After the outing with Frieda he described himself as "still drenched with laughter." This was in May and June 1943.

Cool, thanks. I just looked - A Night To Remember (film about the Titanic) wasn't released until 1958, but Aleister died in 1947. Perhaps the film he laughed at (same title, different story, 1942) was this one http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0036203/ ? That's when he was knocking about with Madame Harris.


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OKontrair
(@okontrair)
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26/06/2011 10:01 pm  

Well spotted, that must be it. I imagined him inappropriately chortling as the ship went down - because that's the sort of thing I do I suppose. I'll look for some of his German favourites if I get time but I'm cooking and just burnt my hand.

OK


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
26/06/2011 10:02 pm  

Attractive as the story of Crowley the Psychopath laughing at the screams of thousands of doomed passengers might be, the 1942 film with the totally different story is, in fact, a romantic comedy... 😀

Careful with the cooking, bro. LOL.


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amadan-De
(@amadan-de)
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26/06/2011 10:40 pm  

LOL
Even people with a deep grounding in AC's Life and Works still have trouble exorcising the 'Demon Crowley' from their minds.
"Beast Laughs at Romantic Comedy" not too sinister really. 😀


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William Thirteen
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26/06/2011 10:48 pm  

it warms the cockles of my heart to think of the old goat going to see the same film again and again, smiling sweetly to himself or slapping his knees in delight at some on-screen hijinx...


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Bedazzled
(@bedazzled)
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27/06/2011 4:12 pm  
"Noctifer" wrote:
I suppose I particularly wonder about his time in Berlin, whether he saw any of the Expressionist films, things we now regard as classics of 'wierd' cinema.

I seem to remember a note (in a diary?) recording a viewing of The Cabinet of Dr Caligari.


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William Thirteen
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27/06/2011 5:05 pm  
"Noctifer" wrote:
I suppose I particularly wonder about his time in Berlin, whether he saw any of the Expressionist films, things we now regard as classics of 'wierd' cinema.

this is somewhat of an aside but those of us interested in German Expressionist film might find it interesting that Albin Grau - whose Prana Film company produced Murnau's Nosferatu - was a member of a 'Pansophic-Lodge' as Frater Pacitus and met Crowley at the famous 'Secret Conference in Thuringia' with Frater Gregorius of Fraternitas Saturni. Grau was rounded up during the Nazi persecution of Freemasonry and is reported to have died at Buchenwald. Some time ago I attempted to locate Grau's residence here in Berlin, but like so many buildings it was destroyed during WWII.


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William Thirteen
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27/06/2011 5:06 pm  

oops. i had wanted to include this link from PR Koenig about the Secret Meeting

http://www.parareligion.ch/2007/fs/secret.htm


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Durga23
(@durga23)
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27/06/2011 5:08 pm  
"OKontrair" wrote:
Well spotted, that must be it. I imagined him inappropriately chortling as the ship went down - because that's the sort of thing I do I suppose. I'll look for some of his German favourites if I get time but I'm cooking and just burnt my hand.

OK

Were you taking a burning roast out of the oven to the "You Bet Your Life" theme? 😀


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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28/06/2011 9:09 pm  

I'm wondering if he ever saw "Haxan"? If he did, I bet he would've enjoyed it! 😈


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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21/10/2011 8:12 am  

Didnt he like the lugosi films prompting his famous pic of him clawing his hand ala lugosi?


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Walterfive
(@walterfive)
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21/10/2011 2:21 pm  

Speaking of whom, yesterday was Bela Lugosi's birthday.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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21/10/2011 2:58 pm  

It is curious that the quote: "still drenched with laughter." would imply the 1958 film with its watery imagery, and there is a 1943 film titled The Titanic, with allegations about A Night to Remember, and perhaps the "goofs" are what he laughed at? The film, which was known for having exceptional special effects for its time, was alleged to have various shots spliced into the 1958 film A Night to Remember. This "fact", however, is greatly overstated as the only shots used by the 1958 film are four brief inserts. Two shots are of the ship sailing in calm waters during the day—a very noticeable goof, since the model used in the 1943 version is very different from the one used in 1958. The other two shots were brief clips of a flooding walkway in the engine room.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanic_(1943_film)


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