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einDoppelganger
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08/11/2011 1:22 am  

Assaulting the border: kabbalistic traces in the margins of Derrida

http://www.nyu.edu/classes/bkg/jwg/kabbalah-derrida.pdf

I came across this pdf quite by accident while doing research on postmodern theorist, feminist , and philosopher Julia Kristeva. I highly recommend her work on Abjection (see The Powers of Horror) to anyone with more than a passing interest in the liminal as well as "transgressive mysticism. "

More on Kristeva here

I imagine both will pertinent to those interested in Grant as well as Crowley's period exploring "the mysteries of aversion" at Cefalu.


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 Anonymous
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08/11/2011 1:42 am  

Very interesting! Thanks!


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alysa
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08/11/2011 2:13 am  

Yes, I agree you come up with interesting things, einDöppelganger!


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 Anonymous
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08/11/2011 2:23 am  

Interesting, Scott.


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michaelclarke18
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08/11/2011 10:25 am  

It's making an interesting case, although I find Derrida's position - with regards to religion generally - one of Atheism. I get the impression that for him it's simply a matter of metaphysics....if there are any references to the Kabbalah in his work, they are evoked only in order to be dismissed.


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einDoppelganger
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08/11/2011 11:19 am  
"michaelclarke18" wrote:
It's making an interesting case, although I find Derrida's position - with regards to religion generally - one of Atheism. I get the impression that for him it's simply a matter of metaphysics....if there are any references to the Kabbalah in his work, they are evoked only in order to be dismissed.

Your point is suggested in the paper, actually. His use is far less a "religious" one but semiotic. The author actually says it quite well, I think, when he notes its a matter more of "convergence than influence."
From my understanding Derrida is using structures from the Kabbalah as part of his elaboration of the sigh-theory. He does not seem to be using the Kabbalah to dismiss but rather to elaborate or to acknowledge points of convergence with his own work.

I admit, I am new to Derrida but I find this article very interesting.
I imagine a discussion on semiotics would be quiet pertinent to anyone considering the nature and use of "magical language."

Did you have a chance to look at the Kristeva article? I'd be interested in your thoughts on that one as well.


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michaelclarke18
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08/11/2011 12:13 pm  

From my understanding Derrida is using structures from the Kabbalah as part of his elaboration of the sigh-theory. He does not seem to be using the Kabbalah to dismiss but rather to elaborate or to acknowledge points of convergence with his own work.

Time prevents me from having a really good look at the paper, but the point I would want to make, would be something like: Although the Kabbalah is up to point a linguistic tradition, like most religions, it is very heavily orientated toward a specific text - which is, ironically but usually - referred to as ''the word of god'' by the respective followers. It's a kind of transcendental, transcendental signifier - perfect for exercises in deconstruction. A perfect tool to test the theory - rather than shape it.

I have read a number of books by Derrida and I have yet to detect any influence - or even references - to the Kabbalah; that is not to say they don't exist. Perhaps the article is more indicative of the kind of utility that goes around when a philosopher is no longer around. But I will certainly have a look at the article when I am a bit more free.


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einDoppelganger
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08/11/2011 8:52 pm  

MClarke: Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this. Its a very interesting point and I look forward to gaining a deeper understanding of the intricacies of Derrida (so much to read, so little time...)

Speaknig of the intersection between semiotics and Magick
(Foucault's Pendulum, anyone?) I came across the book Post-Modern Magic the other day. I only skimmed it but it caught my eye that the author linked linguistics and semiotics to magical practice.

S


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