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lashtal
(@lashtal)
Owner and Editor Admin
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 5304
05/10/2009 9:09 pm  

What book(s) are you reading now?

I'll kick things off:

The Progradior Correspondence - edited by Keith Richmond
Ancient Evenings (again!) - Norman Mailer

Why? The first, because it's edited by one of the foremost Crowley scholars, Keith Richmond. Nice chap, as well. The second? Because it's a near perfect re-telling of the myths and legends of Ancient Egypt. And what is Thelema, if not a resurrection of the Khemic Mythos?

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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Michael Staley
(@michael-staley)
MANIO - it's all in the egg
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3951
05/10/2009 9:32 pm  

I look forward to reading The Progradior Correspondence. At present, though, I'm reading Panic In Detroit by Richard Kaczynski, a generous gift from Michael Kolson - one of the organisers of the Esoteric Book Conference - shortly before I left Seattle. I had had no idea of the scandal caused in Detroit around the time of the Blue Equinox, and this is meticulously researched and related - as one would expect - by the author. However, it was the correspondence between Achad and Crowley from the time which I found most food for thought, since there were letters there which throw a good deal of light on two publishing projects I have on the go at the moment.

I've also been dipping in and out of Spare's The Book of Pleasure for some months now, since I've become increasingly interested in the earlier work of Spare and its development over the subsequent decade.

I recently finished a novel, The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Settle, which fired the imagination like no other novel I've read for a few years now - going back, perhaps, to Clive Barker's Sacrament.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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the_real_simon_iff
(@the_real_simon_iff)
Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1836
05/10/2009 10:55 pm  

Nothing "Thelemic" I have to confess:

Charles Bukowsky - Collected Poetry. Why? Because all of these poems - as desperate and cold as they may sound - are imbued with so much love, pure love of life. And they bring leaping laughter (to me at least). Highly underrated in my estimation.

I am somehow afraid of reading Ken Follet's "Pillars of the Earth" very soon, which I have to do for business. Is it in any way endurable?

Love=Law
Lutz


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alysa
(@alysa)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 655
05/10/2009 11:20 pm  

Now I'm reading Otto Weininger's "Sex and Character" it was important around the turn from the 19th century to the 20th century, Wilhelm Reich, Aleister Crowley among others were influenced by it.


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mika
 mika
(@mika)
Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 360
05/10/2009 11:21 pm  

"Islandia" by Austin Tappan Wright, because it's a trusted friend's all-time favorite book ever and I never got around to reading it before now.

Next in the queue is "The Magician", the second book (after "The Alchemyst") in the series "The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel" by Michael Scott, because I'm a sucker for teen scifi/fantasy fiction books that have intelligent, 3-dimensional, well-written female protagonists (and antagonists). Plus, John Dee as the dastardly villian? Sweet! Combination of historical fact and revisionist fiction, in case that bothers you. Otherwise, it's a fun mindless treat, full of a variety of mythology, fantasy-style "magic" (with fireballs and everything), sibling love and rivalry, action, adventure, and minimal romantic melodrama (so far). I'm enjoying the series a lot, despite the inaccuracies regarding John Dee.

Also reading (off and on) "The Rock Warrior's Way: Mental Training for Climbers" by Arno Ilgner and "Performance Rock Climbing" by Goddard and Neumann. No explanation necessary.


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arthuremerson
(@arthuremerson)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 157
05/10/2009 11:52 pm  

"Fools Crow"- Thomas E. Mails
"Images and Symbols" - Mircea Eliade
"Qabalah, Qlippoth and Goetic Magic" - Thomas Karlsson


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Tiger
(@tiger)
Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1503
06/10/2009 2:44 am  

Solomon, Falcon of Sheba: The Tombs of King David, King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba Discovered by Ralph D . Ellis, has the words Falcon Sheba and Solomon in it.

Ramayana retold by William Buck, supposed to be the kingly way for Indians

With all the books being recommended I might have to restart.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
06/10/2009 5:18 am  

Lon Milo DuQuette - The Chicken Qabalah

This books is insane, but in my opinion in a good way. I am not surprised at all that some hate and some love this book, and that it might arouse confused reactions in some peoples minds. I have always been conscious of Lon Milos good sense of humour, but I didn`t expect he would take it this far!

93
Azoneris


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ozzzz666
(@ozzzz666)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 155
06/10/2009 1:58 pm  

"Born In Blood"- John J. Robinson


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mutat
(@mutat)
Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 22
06/10/2009 3:59 pm  

ON my nightstand....

Starfire Volume ll Number 3
The tree of Life - Israel Regardie (again)
Freedom & Necessity - Steven Brust & Emma Bull (non-Thelemic)


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mal
 mal
(@xon)
⚛️🌌⚕️
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 643
06/10/2009 4:38 pm  

The Cabala of Pegasus by Giordano Bruno, translated by Sondergard & Sowell.
The Cult of Ra by Stephen Quirke.
The Honest Courtesan by Margaret Rosenthal.
The Rotting Goddess by Jacob Rabinowitz.

We hold the Earth fro Hell away. 🌹


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
06/10/2009 5:26 pm  

The Progradior Correspondence, Keith Richmond.
Tantra Sadhana - Mogg Morgan
Light on Masonry - ed. Arturo de Hoyos


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
06/10/2009 6:32 pm  

The Progradior Correspondence - extremely good, so far!

The Bear Comes Home - Rafi Zabor - Contemporary unorthodox Sufism ( for lack of a better description) set in the New York jazz scene circa the 1980's. Zabor is one of the best writers on the subject of music especially its transcendental aspects.

Parallel Worlds Explored - E.J. Gold. - Consciousness meets fringe science. Bases itself on String Theory, the work of Michio Kaku, crystal radio technology, and the "many worlds" interpretation of quantum physics among other things.


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spike418
(@spike418)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 213
06/10/2009 6:46 pm  

Having a busy time of it right now and insufficient space for as much reading as I would like 🙁

But on the bedside table are :-

Robert Rankin - Necrophenia (Uncle Al does get a mention two!)
Nick Kent - The Dark Stuff (nostalgia for the halcyon days of NME and er Uncle Al gets mentioned as well along with that Brummy skiffle group 😈 )


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
06/10/2009 9:59 pm  

at this moment i have been juggling the following three books:

PANPARADOXby Vexior
CANTUS CIRCAEUSby Giordano Bruno
HANDBOOK FOR REBELS AND OUTLAWSby Mark Mirabello

Why? Because of the old adage, Something New, Something Old and Something Borrowed. So consider these books wedding presents to my self as i consumate these alchemical nuptials with Nuit. Her and i can't stay in bed all day having sex.

on the real though, i got PANPARADOX because i wanted a book a little more N.O.X than L.V.X. CANTUS CIRCAEUS because there's nothing like getting grounded in the source material for this great work and finally THE HANDBOOK FOR REBELS AND OUTLAWS because i enjoy the work that Mogg Morgan puts out over at Mandrake and this title puts me in mind of such radical works as the ANARCHIST'S COOKBOOK and all those paramilitary survival books that i use to lust after in the back of SOLIDER OF FORTUNE Magazine back in the halycon days of my youth.

also a special shout out to L.A. ROLLINS and his recently reprinted libertarian tour de force THE MYTH OF NATURAL RIGHTS AND OTHER ESSAYS (published by Nine Banded Books)

i wonder if Mr. Rollins has read LIBER AL VEL LEGIS and if he has what his take on Aiwass' views on liberty and personal freedom would be.

have a great day.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
06/10/2009 10:52 pm  

Ciencia con Conciencia

93

Hello to all. My most recent lectures are

Lenguaje y Naturaleza (Language and Nature) by Noam Chomsky
Deconstruyendo a Darwin (something like: Darwin unbuilt) by Javier Sampedro
I Ching (edited by Richard Wilhelm).

The two first are because I have recently been most interested in the theory of evolution, and the last because I had thought for a long time in reading it.

Cheers

93

Conciencia con Ciencia


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
06/10/2009 10:58 pm  

Oh forgot to mention, also reading How to Own a Gun in California and Stay Out of Jail 🙂 A great book for those of us in the "golden state" that are watching our rights dwindle away...


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chuck
(@chuck)
Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 52
07/10/2009 1:07 am  

93

I'm reading The Progradior Correspondence
because it's the newest book I have.
BTW Did anybody else get a shiver when reading the P.S. on page 85?

And I'm re-reading Olla
because I'm determined to enjoy poetry. Someday.
The first is always listed as an edition of 500 (and I understand there was all kinds of misdirection re: publishing but - come on, this book is everywhere.
I wonder how many first editions the readers of this site could honestly claim to own. I'll bet it's a lot more than 500 ....I'll start. I've got one.

93 93/93

Chuck


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
07/10/2009 3:17 am  

Im just finishing Crowley's complete works - on vIII right now.

I joined the OTO recently and didnt have a copy of the equinox v3:10, or the revival of Magick - so they arrived this week ready to be read.

I also have a copy of Jim Eshlemans Mystical and magical system of the A.'.A.'. which I have been meaning to read for a while.

And I just got Howlings and the Red Goddess from scarlett imprint.

The Progradior Correspondence is on order as is Grants MAgical Revival.

Sigh..........


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Walterfive
(@walterfive)
Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 856
07/10/2009 5:26 pm  
"serpentarius" wrote:
And I just got Howlings and the Red Goddess from scarlett imprint.

The Progradior Correspondence is on order

Mine too. Can't wait to have it in hand.

Let us know how you like Red Goddess, I've been hesitant to get it, every time I considered buying it, for the price there have always been other books I'd rather have for my library, just it hasn't screamed "ESSENTIAL!" at me yet.

Right now, for light lunchtime reading a the office, I'm reading a Sherlock Holmes pastische "A Monstrous Regiment Of Women" (somewhat entertaining), for deeper rereading it's Christina Stoddard's/Inquire Within's "Trail Of The Serpent" (how could someone so close to being right on so many levels be SO WRONG?), and deciphering the hand-writing in "A Facsimile Rosicrucian Alchemical Manuscript On the Philosophers Stone" from Hell Fire Club Books when I haven't got anything else pressing. Waiting to be read I have the 1920's Hobo epic "You Can't Win" by Jack Black (intro by William S. Burroughs), "The Fortunes of Faust" by E.M. Butler, and "The Myth of the Magus" by E.M. Butler.

Oh, I've slowly been re-viewing my Hi-Res DVD-Rom of the Naughty Nun pirate of "How To Start Your Own McOTO" to contrast and compare with "OTO Rituals And Sex Magick."


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lashtal
(@lashtal)
Owner and Editor Admin
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 5304
07/10/2009 6:26 pm  
"chuck" wrote:
I wonder how many first editions [ie of OLLA] the readers of this site could honestly claim to own. I'll bet it's a lot more than 500 ....I'll start. I've got one.

Me, too - and that makes only 498 to track down. My copy was from the library of C F Russell, by the way. The Mandrake Press reprint is an excellent piece of work, too, although you can very safely ignore the feeble Symonds preface.

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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Walterfive
(@walterfive)
Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 856
07/10/2009 8:07 pm  
"mal" wrote:
The Cabala of Pegasus by Giordano Bruno, translated by Sondergard & Sowell.

That title's been on my wish-list for a few years now. (As in "wish I could find a copy for less than $42.00...) How are you liking it, Mal? What do you think of it?


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
08/10/2009 1:33 am  
"lashtal" wrote:
"chuck" wrote:
I wonder how many first editions [ie of OLLA] the readers of this site could honestly claim to own. I'll bet it's a lot more than 500 ....I'll start. I've got one.

Me, too - and that makes only 498 to track down. My copy was from the library of C F Russell, by the way. The Mandrake Press reprint is an excellent piece of work, too, although you can very safely ignore the feeble Symonds preface.

93

Mine was once owned by Ray Burlingame.

Oddly the Burlingames are also responsible for what is without doubt the shabbiest offering in this catalog, a copy of Crowley's Olla, which has been rather severely gnawed by the family dog. 🙂

Joel
93 93/93


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Proteus
(@proteus)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 243
08/10/2009 2:24 am  

Lots of Poe; 'tis the season!

Crowley's Gargoyles; always overlooked it until recently

Black Marigolds;

John


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phthah
(@phthah)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 210
08/10/2009 3:15 am  

93,

"chuck" wrote:
93

I wonder how many first editions the readers of this site could honestly claim to own. I'll bet it's a lot more than 500 ....I'll start. I've got one.

93 93/93

Chuck

Well, I have a first edition of Olla as well. Regarding how many copies were made, mine does say that it was "strictly" limited to 500. But what I find even more interesting are the 20 "special edition" copies mentioned that were made for "friends and helpers". I wonder if any of those are still extant?
Regarding A.C's poetry, believe it or not I was actually first exposed to it in an English class in college! The poem we had to read was "The King-Ghost". Not a bad choice!

93 93/93
phthah


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
08/10/2009 4:28 pm  

Voudon Gnostic Workbook -Bertiaux (I need to get my hands on Voudon Gnosis by David Beth)

Beyond the Mauve Zone (Kind of on-going re-read with note taking over the last few weeks)

Through the Gates of Death-Dion Fortune

Hekate in Ancient Greek Religion-Robert Von Rudloff


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
08/10/2009 6:40 pm  

Anna Karenina

The Power of Now - Eckhart Tolle

Dylan on Dylan (Bob Dylan Interviews)


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
08/10/2009 7:28 pm  

Reading now: Charles Fielding - The Practical Qabalah

Seems very good. I ordered this book by intuition, not being familiar with the author before. Fielding seems to have studied together in a Society of Inner Light with Dion Fortune. Has any of you read his books before? Any other good ones by experience than only this?

93
Azoneris


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alysa
(@alysa)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 655
08/10/2009 9:13 pm  

Society of Inner Light was founded by Dion Fortune, so I assume Charles Fielding was a pupil of her, rather than 'studied together'. looked for his date of birth on the Internet but di'nt found it.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
08/10/2009 9:17 pm  
"alysa" wrote:
Society of Inner Light was founded by Dion Fortune, so I assume Charles Fielding was a pupil of her, rather than 'studied together'. looked for his date of birth on the Internet but di'nt found it.

Yes, you are right. I expressed myself little deceptively.

93 93/93
Azoneris


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
09/10/2009 10:35 am  

Having just completed obtaining typhonian trilogies, I am greatly enjoying Aleister Crowley &... also reading Initiation in the great Pyramid-Earlyne Chaney, Tibetan yoga and secret doctrines-Evans-Wentz and The curious lore of precious stones-Kunz. Still climbing the mountain.


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warriormonk93
(@warriormonk93)
Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 82
09/10/2009 12:03 pm  

I'm reading a true crime book on Montreals Mafia. Quite interesting as I know the places and some of the characters... Its called "The Sixth Family: The Collapse of the New York Mafia and the Rise of Vito Rizzuto". Im also reading Dan Browns "The Lost Symbol", light stuff before beddy byes.... 93's


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SatansAdvocaat
(@satansadvocaat)
Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 351
09/10/2009 2:06 pm  

Being a self-avowed scavenger fish, lurking at the bottom of the Thelemic Reading Room, I've managed to dredge up the following:

Venus in Snakeskin: Memoirs of a Romanian Dominatrix -
Leobia Slug (Sighisoara Press, 1977),

Paris is Not Worth a Gnostic Mass ! - Henri de Navarre (Psychic Transmission, in the early hours),

The Iron Cage: The Thelemic Ethic and the Rise of Corporate Religion - Max Weber and Hugh Trevor-Roper (Woodhouse University Press, not yet published but long overdue),

The Epic of Gilgamesh - in the original Sumero-Akkadian, and last but not least:

Hebrew Translation of Liber AL - 'Layla' (not as pleasurable as rubbing one's testicles with sandpaper, but pretty damn close).

This post has been scanned for the use of offensive language (surely not), if any of it should cause offense, then 'Aum, Let it kill me !' (That's got to be a typo - 😈 - surely not ?). Meanwhile, I'm off to contemplate the Stele of Revelling.

Love under Will to All,

S.A.


The Children of Transgression are the Dragons of the Law.


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the_real_simon_iff
(@the_real_simon_iff)
Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1836
09/10/2009 8:16 pm  
"Azoneris" wrote:
Lon Milo DuQuette - The Chicken Qabalah

This books is insane, but in my opinion in a good way.

You made me pick up my copy and start reading it too for the first time. And so far I can agree with you...

Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
09/10/2009 10:19 pm  

I'm trying to get through:
A Primer on Jungian Psychology

I'm finding it pretty dry though.


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Proteus
(@proteus)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 243
09/10/2009 11:06 pm  

wbwarnerb,

Give Jung's Psychology and Alchemy or Alchemical Studies a try. Really great work.

John


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
09/10/2009 11:07 pm  
"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
"Azoneris" wrote:
Lon Milo DuQuette - The Chicken Qabalah

This books is insane, but in my opinion in a good way.

You made me pick up my copy and start reading it too for the first time. And so far I can agree with you...

Love=Law
Lutz

Great. Somehow that book made Qabalah come more alive than some other books about the same subject. The descriptions and metaphors were unique.

93
Azoneris


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
10/10/2009 1:18 am  

Re-reading "Outer Gateways" by Kenneth Grant. (Interestingly, Grant mentions the name that I chose as my Magickal Motto, long before I even ordered this wonderful Tome. (Actually, after a recent Initiation, via paranoiac critical activity with Gematria, it was revealed to me that "I" did not really choose that name. It was my H.G.A. telling me "His", no "Our" for we are One, name. At the time I first "chose" it, it came as a fascination with the name that I could not explain. I realize that, because I was researching and thinking about a suitable Order name with such zeal , it came to me as this "fascination". I believe that, if I had quieted all the mind chatter, that I would have heard him tell me that this was Our name. Either way I would have ended up with it. It happened the way it was supposed to, as I was later to learn during "Our" K&C.)

I've recently become fascinated with what quotations I have read by Manly P. Hall and have become determined to read/own some of his works. I remember you saying, Kyle, that "you had a basement full of his books gathering dust", or something to that effect (on a thread on Spectral Light). If you care to share any of the works of this genius with me Kyle, I'd be forever grateful. As you may know the Order that I "chose" the Magickal Motto for is structured like freemasonry and I am sure some of Manly P. Hall's works would be very useful to me. BTW, congrats on selling out all of "Ex-Libris"....I'm glad I received one bookplte with "The True Grimoire"!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
10/10/2009 1:36 am  

Fortune's Society of the Inner Light had also given rise to other orders, including The London Group, once headed by Alan Adams, aka Charles Fielding. Not sure if it was Adams or Fielding who lacks an Internet birth date...


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FraterNuin
(@fraternuin)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 26
10/10/2009 2:03 pm  

Whilst waiting for The Progradior Correspondence to arrive (damn antipodes and post) I am reading:

'The Adornment of the Spiritual Marriage' by Jan van Ruysbroeck
'Liber XV' (well, studying rather than reading)

and started flicking through

'Enochian Vision Magick' by Lon Milo DuQuette


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michaelclarke18
(@michaelclarke18)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1264
10/10/2009 4:31 pm  

At the moment:-

Voudon Gnosis by David Beth
A clear and concise little book that outlines the theories quite nicely.

Starfire Volume I Number 5
Interesting collection of articles from some key practitioners including Andrew Chumbley and Gavin Semple. Also an interesting article from Lashtal's own, Michael Staley.

I just don't understand the fascination that people have with The Red Goddess - it's very superficial and contains little of interest.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
10/10/2009 5:15 pm  
"michaelclarke18" wrote:
I just don't understand the fascination that people have with The Red Goddess - it's very superficial and contains little of interest.

Well, within the Thelemic scheme of things Babalon exerts a lot of fascination, she's the Last Lady, the strange attractor waiting on the other side of the Abyss, and not much has been written on Her. So any book that comes close is going to sell.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
10/10/2009 5:53 pm  
"tai" wrote:
"michaelclarke18" wrote:
I just don't understand the fascination that people have with The Red Goddess - it's very superficial and contains little of interest.

Well, within the Thelemic scheme of things Babalon exerts a lot of fascination, she's the Last Lady, the strange attractor waiting on the other side of the Abyss, and not much has been written on Her. So any book that comes close is going to sell.

I was about to say that I haven`t seen much written of Babalon precisely, at least compared to the many other subjects among Thelema. That must be one reason that Red Goddess is so popular. Anyway that doesn`t deny the fact that I really liked it. 😛

93 93/93
Azoneris


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
10/10/2009 7:12 pm  
"chuck" wrote:
I wonder how many first editions the readers of this site could honestly claim to own. I'll bet it's a lot more than 500 ....I'll start. I've got one.

I've got one.

How many have near perfect dust jackets? 😉


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alysa
(@alysa)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 655
10/10/2009 10:43 pm  

Just like Fortune's Society of the Inner Light, gave rise to ofsprings, other organisations had and will have that time and again, I googled the name 'Charles Fielding', and later I googled the name 'Alan Adams' also but did'nt find any date of birth on that name either.


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mal
 mal
(@xon)
⚛️🌌⚕️
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 643
10/10/2009 11:01 pm  
"Walterfive" wrote:
"mal" wrote:
The Cabala of Pegasus by Giordano Bruno, translated by Sondergard & Sowell.

That title's been on my wish-list for a few years now. (As in "wish I could find a copy for less than $42.00...) How are you liking it, Mal? What do you think of it?

The book is quite enjoyable, although it did create a want for more than a familiarity with renaissance hermetics to appreciate the work, yet the text is very well annotated, providing clarification of many obscure references.
Most of the work is written as a dialogue, which although written a few hundred years ago, seems fresh and entertaining. Bruno's hyloziostic world view is presented but not overly detailed as he seems to focus more upon the faults of Naturalism in this work.
The lack of diagrams, tables, and gematric equations, which seem to make up the bulk of the content of texts upon the subject of Cabala, may be turn off for some who consider those conventions requisites of a quality book on the subject.

We hold the Earth fro Hell away. 🌹


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alysa
(@alysa)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 655
10/10/2009 11:28 pm  

Re - "The Red Goddes", there's not much written about Her, also the fact that the author wrote it from a worshipper's perspective makes it more interesting.


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Palamedes
(@palamedes)
Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 450
11/10/2009 7:03 pm  

Tanya Luhrmann, Persuasions of the Witch's Craft: Ritual Magic in Contemporary England (Oxford University Press, 1989). An anthropology of contemporary wicca / ritual magic / paganism, where the author joined several covens, received several initiations, and participated in a regular ritual work during the process of research for the book. Intelligent and well-written. Crowley is mentioned several times, mostly in a positive (of the type, brilliant but somewhat sinister character).

Jeffrey Kripal, Esalen: America and the Religion of No Religion (Chicago University Press, 2007). A brilliant and juicy book about a major counter-cultural center and the bunch of colourfull characters involved. A good deal of the subject matter is about merging the scientific and religious impulses and about the role and importance of body and sexuality in the spiritual quest. Thus, Thelema is here present in spirit, though not in letter - at least in my reading. One also wonders, why is it that those who temperamentally and intellectually appear to be very close to the ethos of Thelema usually either do not know or do not care about it? Is it still too occult or ...?

David Gordon White, Sinister Yogis (Chicago University Press, 2009). Another great book by a major scholar who unfortunately dismisses any notion of Western tantra as nonsense (about which he wrote a bit in the conclusion to his previous book, Kiss of the Yogini).

Gustav Meyrink, The Golem (Dedalus, 1995). Meyrink is the best writer of occult fiction in my opinion, plus he was himself a practitioner of both yoga and magic(k). (See a biography by his translator MIke Mitchell, Vivo: The Life of Gustav Meyrink, Dedalus, 2008). He has that quality, also very much present in Lovecraft and Grant, to switch between the waking state reality and a dream in an almost imperceptible manner. His novel The Angel of the West Window (Dedalus, 1999), which figures John Dee and Edward Kelley, is also highly recommended.

Tyr: Myth, Culture, Tradition (Vol. 3, 2007). This is an annual magazine of 'radical traditionalist.' Bunch of interesting stuff. Too Nordic for my non-Germanic soul, but generally speaking, the quality of writing is solid and the ideas are, well, radically traditionalist so it's a nice change from the usual vox populi.


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Palamedes
(@palamedes)
Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 450
11/10/2009 7:05 pm  

P.S. I meant to say, that Tyr is a magazine of radical traditionalism.


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