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ignant666
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29/02/2020 2:31 pm  

All signs point to an early and sunny spring in the Northern Hemisphere, with the last frost running very early. You'll want to get those spring bulbs into the ground soon, and start planning out spring seeding for the vegetable, and flower, gardens. My daffodils are already coming up strongly.

There has been an explosion of new nutty posts, and posters, since the Winter Solstice. In the last month alone, we have had multiple competing AL cypher solutions, 26 dimensional ducks, a Nazi Gorean, obsessive stalker confessions- the list just goes on and on.

As is well known, an increase in unusually nutty posts here at lashtal after the Solstice is an historically reliable indicator of how soon winter will end, and spring will begin.

By my calculations, we are only one tentacle-cultist, New True Qabala, or new Crowley reincarnation post short of the earliest, sunniest spring ever!

Cultivate those gardens, folks! Get planting!


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The HGA of a Duck
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29/02/2020 4:36 pm  

I grow tomatoes in a greenhouse here in the UK. I didn't buy any seeds last year, I just used the "volunteers" that sprang up. One of them produced a "mutant" that gave the tomatoes a purplish hue. I thought that was cool so I saved some seeds from it to grow this year.

Posted by: @ignant666

26 dimensional ducks

I may be a bit "quackers" but I mean well. 🙂 


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ignant666
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29/02/2020 5:18 pm  

Probably some sort of Mendelian back-sort from hybridizing the parent plant(s)- lots of heirloom tomato varieties are very dark colored. These are two purple/black heirloom tomato varieties i can recommend:

https://www.seedsavers.org/black-krim-tomato

https://www.seedsavers.org/cherokee-purple-organic-tomato

Last year, i did tomatoes, eggplant (aka aubergines), zucchini (aka courgettes), corn (aka maize; one sweet and one Indian variety); climbing beans up the cornstalks (two Indian varieties), hops, assorted lettuces, and lots of herbs, the oregano and basil did best- still can't keep the cilantro growing well. Lots of wild and cultivated red and black raspberries and wild blackberries as well. And pear trees. Probably other stuff i forgot. and enormous amounts of cultivated and wild/native flowers.

This year, all of the above, plus i think pumpkins and watermelons. Some new flowers planned, and possibly a tree for the front yard for more shade and to hid my neighbor's ugly-ass house.

High hopes for the new season based on the omens here!


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The HGA of a Duck
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29/02/2020 7:26 pm  

You seem to be a lot more advanced, I guess I should make more of an effort, I just go with tomatoes mainly. The blight usually gets them after a while, some of the "disease resistant" F1 ones seem to last a bit longer. Thanks for the recommendations, the "Black Krim" looks quite appetising in that pic, I'll buy some seeds off ebay (it actually works out cheaper to have them sent over from the US).

And I like the way you guys have a real English word for "eggplant" and we don't, we just have the fancy French words "aubergine" and "courgette", showing that these are fairly new here.


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dom
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29/02/2020 7:33 pm  

@ignant666

 

if you think that certain posts are discriminatory, racist or sectarian then report them. 

 

https://www.lashtal.com/wiki/Aleister_Crowley_Timeline


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ignant666
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29/02/2020 7:59 pm  

This is a gardening thread, david- cuckoos and looney-tunes posters are only important here as harbingers of an early spring.

Also, not really the reporting kind- my mother always told me a tattletale was a shameful thing to be. More of a direct-action man.

Re garden vocabulary: Reading Agatha Christie as a child, i always wondered "WTF is a mangel-wurzel?" which people always seemed to be growing. And then Poirot retired to raise courgettes- so disappointing to find out these were mere zucchinis.

"Aubergine" always brings to mind an old paramour, a punk-rock hair-stylist from Queens with purple hair, which she described as "Aw-Buh-JEAN" from the dye label.

As to how "advanced" a gardener i am, i have a decent amount of space (1/4 acre), lots of sun, and immense amounts of free time. I had a vegetable garden in high school, and my best friend's dad let us grow reefer behind his family vegetable garden if we chopped all the wood they needed to heat their house. Went back to that type of gardening to pay my university tuition, so a little more (highly specialized) gardening experience there.

Since i moved from NYC to a semi-rural place 9 years ago, i've gotten back into the gardening, but there was that 35-year break, other than that growing-flowers-in-a-basement phase. I just plant a lot of stuff and most of it seems to thrive.

 


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ignant666
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29/02/2020 8:16 pm  

Flowers more or less in order of appearance, and where they're planted: Daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, another spring bulb one i forget the name of. Dogwood, forsythia. Peonies, pansies. Black-eyed Susan, honeysuckle, wild roses, tame roses, swamp-mallow, another flowering swamp plant i forget, a bunch of other flowering native plants i forget the names of. Purple iris, black iris, swamp iris (also purple), hollyhocks, opium poppies. Oh and i left strawberries off my edible garden list and they make nice flowers too.

Much of this stuff was already here when we bought our 150-year old fixer-upper house (most recently a crack-house), but deeply buried in weeds, volunteer maples, and miles and miles of intertwined poison ivy, with roots like the Transatlantic Cable running 50-100' across my weed-choked lawns. It took three years to more or less eradicate the poison ivy- i don't think you have it in the UK, if so, be very glad. Well three years, and slightly less than an ocean, of calamine lotion.

Hoping to add an outdoor cannabis patch this year if the NY state legislature gets off the pot with this year's budget, and legalizes cultivation, which seems likely. Not ornamental flowers, but flowers nonetheless.


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ignant666
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29/02/2020 8:29 pm  

Oh, and our friend in Brazil who is a garden person sent me a bunch of seeds, mostly Brazilian hot pepper varieties that don't exist in the States, but also mango, papaya, and passion fruit- these won't winter over, but perhaps i need to build a greenhouse. She's coming to visit soon, so she will most likely bring me more seeds.

Also left out the immense number of sunflowers (3 varieties) in one yard, and the morning glories, another morning-glory-related vine flower that blooms at night, and the night scented tobacco. And the lettuce, spinach, and collards. And a giant aloe.

And other stuff probably- old timer's disease.


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dom
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29/02/2020 9:46 pm  

Yeah yeah yeah.  Loose use of the term 'nazi' enables the growth of actual nazism.

https://www.lashtal.com/wiki/Aleister_Crowley_Timeline


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ignant666
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29/02/2020 10:01 pm  

Gardening, david, gardening. We can discuss those things elsewhere.


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AbulDiz
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29/02/2020 10:36 pm  

I'm sure I remember AC saying in the Confessions that botany was a subject he was ignorant of and would have liked to have more knowledge of if given the time.


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djedi
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01/03/2020 12:44 am  
Posted by: @ignant666

opium poppies

Ooh la la, planted in your garden and in the muck of ambiguous legality. But I'm sure they're only for aesthetic purposes, officer, that's why they're hidden behind my other flowers.

There was an old potion Pythagoras would drink during his ecstasies in the temples of Croton. Cucumber seeds, seedless dried raisins, coriander flowers, mallow and purslane seeds, meal and a few other ingredients I can't remember were mixed together with wild honey. Pythagoras said Hercules subsisted on this during his trek through the Libyan desert, after having been granted the recipe by Ceres.

There's always a niggling memory that attacks me when I think about this sort of thing, just on the periphery, of some entheogenic Chinese elixir that AC drank, but whenever I look for a reference to it I come away empty-handed.


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kidneyhawk
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01/03/2020 12:50 am  

Ignant, your garden space sounds beyond glorious. I began gardening for the first time just last year and I've not stopped. I began with tomatoes (Go, Duck!), swiss chard, beets (great leaves but little to be had with the beet root), jalapenos, bell pepper, tiny amount of dill, kale and basil. I, too, had a tough time with cilantro but am not giving up! All of the above I had planted just at the water line of one of the several ancient black walnut trees in my yard. Theoretically, none of those plants should have grown! I also have used the window sills of very tolerant co-workers who've not minded (too terribly) my gardening in their offices. At present, we've got pepper plants doing well in my first overwintering and lots of new stuff growing inside: an avocado tree, lemon tree, dill, a 5 foot tall tomato plant, lots of seedlings which are going to be very happy to see spring.

 

AbulDiz, it would be interesting to read the passage you are referring to (I can't recall it myself atm). But of course, I also starting wondering how the general theme of gardening (which needs no other justification) might relate to the larger scope of the Aleister Crowley Society.

 

It does seem that gardening has a very calming and balancing effect. Individuals who have been “fried” in the nervous system have found solace and happiness in cultivating plants. The nervous, would-be suicide, Cowper, retreated to the serenity of his garden after “exposure” to the over-bearing heavy handed John Newton. Syd Barrett was extraordinarily fond of flowers and plant life after leaving Floyd and retreating from society in general.

 

This has me thinking of such pursuits as immediately connected to the Earth and Planetary Consciousness. One doesn't need “metaphysics” to benefit cooperating with the vegetable kingdom but there are certainly esoteric vantage points to explore, such as John Lash's Gnostic Ecology.

 

How much record is there of gardening at Cefalu?


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Shiva
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01/03/2020 1:55 am  
Posted by: @dom

Yeah yeah yeah.  Loose use of the term 'nazi' enables the growth of actual nazism.

Obsession Alert - Call the exorcist.

 

Posted by: @djedi

the muck of ambiguous

Opium poppies are entirely legal to grow in the USA. They are the hometown flower in Friday Harbor, WA. Everyone has them in profusion. Nobody hides them. If the Establishment finds one bulb slit with a  razor ... then the whole place becomes illegal.

Posted by: @kidneyhawk

It does seem that gardening has a very calming and balancing effect.

This appears to be true. For some people. It doesn't work for some others ... like me.

 


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Behemoth
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01/03/2020 3:06 am  
 

 

Posted by: @shiva

Opium poppies are entirely legal to grow in the USA. They are the hometown flower in Friday Harbor, WA. Everyone has them in profusion. Nobody hides them. If the Establishment finds one bulb slit with a  razor ... then the whole place becomes illegal.

 

Same goes for cannabis cultivation here in my country, including the cannabis indica, cannabis sativa and cannabis ruderalis strains. You can plant fields of them, literally, the moment it becomes illegal is when you try to pick up the buds. I am talking about strains that contain at least more than 0.2% THC and strains that are not considered industrial hemp.

 

I used to own two practical gardening guides called: "the slow gardener" and "the mad gardener". First mentioned guide was about making the poppies thrive and the second for the herb dangerous.

 

I've had some of my illegal hemp growing operations halted by the Establishment and some have succeeded "back in the day", but these operations did not use natural daylight, instead, sodium-vapor-lamps were used producing a wavelength of light near 589 nanometres ( 589 = Greenness, verdure, in Sepher Sephiroth ).

 

In the wild, not so much of success. Gathering lots of them in one place is asking for trouble and I don't kinda like the digging, you get tired fast. You could always scatter them, but then there is the quality of soil to consider, and watering (apart from rain), if not any wet nurses are available. But I am not unreadie for harde ffortunes, chymical substances are easie of get’g, if there be’g II. goode Chymists in Towne: I've managed to transform extremely barren and unlikely conditions to my favor before. The poppies like it rough when it comes to soil, and they like it windy too.

Behold now Behemoth, which I made with thee; he eateth grass as an ox.


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Shiva
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01/03/2020 7:01 am  
Posted by: @behemoth

I don't kinda like the digging, you get tired fast.

Oh, you're like me. I've spent plenty of time in the dirt, and some of it was actually fun. I was exposed to the "Agriculture" course in Junior High School. We all grew a row of radishes. After that, a bad student was taken out of service and exiled to the Agriculture farm. Somehow I am not a farmer. I think it takes the "A" blood-type.


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ignant666
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01/03/2020 12:37 pm  

You have to enjoy manual labor, and lots of it, to grow anything. I will admit there are days when i like it less than some other days. Also, it is a cumulative process, and things and processes build on each other, so one sees more and more return to one's labor over time.

And there is marvelous labor-saving technology, like the flamethrower weeder i bought last year, which transforms everyone's least favorite garden task into good fun.

Yes, poppies are 100% legal to grow, though sometimes one ends up in court establishing this.

In 1997, a pal was busted in Seattle for having dried poppies, a popular dried flower arrangement constituent available at florists all over the USA, because he had written a book (Opium For The Masses, new edition Feral House 2009) about how to extract opium from said dried poppies. The genius drug-lab SWAT raiding team that searched his house was unable to recognize and confiscate a vacuum pump (about as basic a piece of drug lab equipment as there is). The case attracted national attention and he plead out to possessing illegal fireworks.

https://www.nytimes.com/1997/05/25/us/author-of-book-on-poppy-cultivation-cleared-of-drug-charge.html

Sadly, the pretty good Harper's article by Micheal Pollan about the case is pay-walled.


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Shiva
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01/03/2020 5:15 pm  
Posted by: @ignant666

ou have to enjoy manual labor, and lots of it, to grow anything. I will admit there are days when i like it less than some other days. Also, it is a cumulative process, and things and processes build on each other, so one sees more and more return to one's labor over time.

I personally agree with this. I have had a long stretch at hard labor. My reluctances in engaging a garden are manifold:
1. The Agriculture dept is the same as going to jail.
2. I build things. Other people grow things.
3. Our present venue is unsuitable for gardens. Cacti and desert plants grow well, but offer little food value.
4. Even if the soil was fertile, I'd still be building, and other planting.

However, as a medical look into gardens, I find home gardens, properly fertilized, are superior to commercial farms.

The commercial farmers (big biz ag deep state) have found that they can grow crops that look great, but they have almost no food value, because they discovered they only have to fertilize with 4 elements.

This is a rather important point, and I was so impressed by it that I have saved the data on my Borg for decades. Now I will evoke it and do a terrible show and tell ...

    1948 1965 1973  
SPINACH 100g   158 mg Fe 27 mg Fe 2.2 mg Fe  
           
Cobalt (B12 proc req)   Lettuce Cabbage String Beans = 0 Cobalt      
           
60 elements in plants - we put back 4: P, Ca, N, Phos        
image

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Shiva
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01/03/2020 5:46 pm  

That Table (above) is a copy-n-paste from a spreadsheet. The forum software guidelines will not allow me to comment (no space below the Table. So here we are, one post down, but translated into plain Ingles. These are gov measurements ...

Using Spinach as an example, in 1948, i110 grams of spinach contained 158 mg of Iron.
In 1965, the same amount of spinach had 27 mg of Iron.
In 1973, the number was 2.2 mg of Iron.

Cobalt is required to produce Vit B12 in plants.
In 1973, lettuce, cabbage, string beans, had 0 (zero) cobalt.

Why?

There are sixty (60) elements in various plants. Modern farming puts back only four of them: Phosphorus, Calcium, Potassium, Nitrogen. The result is that the soil is depleted of the other 56 elements. The produce looks great in the grocery store, but there is a really big deficiency in vitamins and minerals.

The use of bovine excrement and other natural fertilizers in home gardens is therefore much more healthy and life-sustaining than the "hollow" vegetables and fruits we buy on the common market.

These figures are dated (stopping in 1973 when I first copied them down. These figures pertain to modern countries that use modern, 4-element replacement. Third world countries where people dig and throw in cow poop are still good to eat and supply 1948-era contents.

Posted by: @ignant666

Yes, poppies are 100% legal to grow, though sometimes one ends up in court establishing this.

Not in Friday Harbor, WA. Unless there's a razor slit in the seed pod (opium drips out). There was a case in East Los Angeles: The Polis found a couple poppy plants on a porch in an apartment. There was a big distinction made between vertical or horizontal slits. One is Chinese, the other Vietnamese. The slits matched the Viet syle of slice, and the people living in the apartment were Viet. I suppose they had trouble establishing an excuse.

Posted by: @ignant666

he plead out to possessing illegal fireworks.

WTF? This sounds like some horror story out of misapplied legal journals.

What were the illegal fireworks? Live hand grenades?


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ignant666
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01/03/2020 5:57 pm  

According to the cops, yes, according to him, no, and knowing Jim, probably, in real life, yes. For experimental purposes only, of course.

This was another charge, besides all the poppy, and gun, charges; all the guns turned out to be legal, so those got dropped quick.

And the poppy charges turned out to be unsustainable, um, poppycock, and so had to dropped, but he had taken it on the lam for a while before turning himself in, and so had to be made to pay a price (may sound familiar to some), and so that was their bottom line as to what he had to plead to, in order to walk.

The whole thing was a messy and sordid tale involving getting ratted out to the cops by an angry expelled-at-gun-point ex-house-guest who was a famous "anarchist" author but felt no compunction about going to "The Man" for revenge.


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Shiva
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01/03/2020 8:28 pm  
Posted by: @ignant666

an angry expelled-at-gun-point ex-house-guest who was a famous "anarchist" author but felt no compunction about going to "The Man" for revenge.

Yes, angry ex-friends are often involved in causing this sort of trouble.


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christibrany
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02/03/2020 6:48 pm  

@shiva

 

We make it a point to only buy organic vegetables, preferably heirloom.

Do you think those would have more nutrients, or not really because it is still poor soil(?)?

 

 

@ignant666

 

I like growing things too, my wife even more so.

 

I have raised a nice large scorpion pepper plant in a pot.  He is huge but he never wants to make peppers. Just flowers.   That's fine with me.

 

I also am going to start growing, I think some beans for fun.

 

My wife brought some seeds from portugal and is growing portuguese cabbage, and also we had some kind of white viny flower I forget the name.

 

Also we have a large tomato (cherry) plant that grows really tasty ones.  Much better than store bought.

 

All of our gardening now is in pots due to living in a condo but when we get a house hopefully in a year our plan is to have a large veggie and flower garden.   🙂

 

I enjoy it, but not when its super hot out lol.

 

I did a garden/lawn service in college with some friends and we only lasted maybe 3 months because the pay was not very good for the amount of hours sweating in the summer sun. 

 


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Shiva
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02/03/2020 8:20 pm  
Posted by: @christibrany

Do you think those would have more nutrients, or not really because it is still poor soil(?)?

Theoretically, organic is supposed to be the real thing. But the word "organic," has been legally but improperly used to identify products that only partially conform. Let's go to school ...

F = spiled-contaminated-shrunken commercal produce

D = acceptable grocery produce (semi-fresh) that will sustain life

C = "Organic"

B = Organic with full listing of ingredients or mode of production
(i.e., "Grass feed Argentina Angus, no antibiotics, no growth hormone")

A = Your own garden, or community garden, or a friend's garden ... Because you can't trust anybody. You, too, can build your own McSolar Ranch.

 

The term organic has been seized upon and manipulated by The Black Lodge. You see how everything is related to certain basic concepts?


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christibrany
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02/03/2020 8:30 pm  

that makes sense, thank you.

Yes then we usually get B or C.  I think the worst thing we do is occasionally fall for the discount grade meat that is not organic ie level D.  Usually we get the level B meat like organic grass fed local etc etc but it depends on the budget.

 

We did discover that the organic heirloom eggs are so much tastier than the organic non heirloom.  Far darker yolks too.

 

Yolkels. 


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ignant666
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02/03/2020 8:43 pm  

Besides tomatoes, the biggest food-difference is the free-range, never-frozen chicken, vs. the standard US supermarket chicken.

Anyone who has ever eaten chicken in any other country, and also in the US, cannot help but notice that the typical US chicken has little/no flavor.

Whether this is because of their diet, mass freezing, the infamous "American chlorine-chicken process" that Brits are so scared of (but that i have never heard of outside the UK press), or what, i don't know.

But the chicken from the artisanal butcher in town tastes like them furrin chickens, ie has flavor, and is well worth the considerable price premium.

 


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Shiva
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02/03/2020 9:23 pm  
Posted by: @ignant666

or what, i don't know.

The bleach spraying in th US is to kill Salmonela, which is rampant in chicken parts and even eggs. I guess it holds the count down, but in US or UK thoroughly cooking the Chicken or Egg gets the buggers gone. Then, one must consider their hands, knife, cutting board, etc. I don't think the bleach wash kills all the Sals, like down in the cracks and corners. But then I've put my hands into bleach many, many times, So have you (anyone), right? It didn't disfigure or kill me.

Posted by: @ignant666

the considerable price premium.

Commercial food is (relatively) cheap. All others pay cash.

Free-range, no antibiotic, no growth hormone, naturally fed (possibly some supplements), no sugar, true organic, all cost more.Thank you for your generous donation.

Commercial food is cheaper because they've cut every corner and chemically induced both weight and growth acceleration. Hi-speed food, low octane rating. It will keep you alive, but dietary supplements are recommended by me. I take one Swanson gel-cap multiple vitain/meral ... twice a week. If you do the same, you will be able to operate The Horus Toy, if it works and has not been accelerated or cut corners.


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The HGA of a Duck
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03/03/2020 5:47 pm  
Posted by: @christibrany

He is huge but he never wants to make peppers. Just flowers.

Sounds like it may be a pollination issue. You could try giving "him" a shake now and then to make the pollen move a bit. I do this with my tomatoes, as they're in a greenhouse, they don't get any wind to shake them. Peppers are also in the nightshade family.


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christibrany
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03/03/2020 5:52 pm  

I planted 'white Lisbon green onions' last night.  Supposed to take 10 to 15 days to sprout.  We shall see if they are happy. 

Will be nice when we move so I can have a proper outdoor garden. 

 

I once grew poppies and my cats ate them all. They slept a lot.  

 

Another time we had a pumpkin growing project at school. 

I rode my bike home with the little plant I had nurtured from a sprout in my water bottle carrier/rack.  The wind broke the sprout so I made a toothpick splint, and nurtured it to health.  Then years later we still had giant pumpkins growing in our yard.  Good times. 

 

I can't recall AC ever talking about gardening, whether of the subsistence or aesthetic variety?

 


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christibrany
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03/03/2020 6:08 pm  

@duck

 

I tried that - and always sprayin 'im with water but Mr Pepper doesn't want kids.  I think he learnt from us lol.   At this point the plant is like over 3 years old so I have to wonder his life span in a pot. He stopped growing taller for sure. He is about 4 feet tall. 

 

All the other plants are 'good' though 😀 

 


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The HGA of a Duck
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03/03/2020 6:24 pm  

You seem to have an affection for these plants, like calling them "him", its almost cute.

And it sounds like that pepper is a "character" and it might be better to leave him as he is and not disturb him too much. If you did want him to fruit you could give him some plant food. The elements "N", "P" and "K" are the main ones, one's meant to be good for roots, one for leaves and one for fruit, I forget which is which.


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christibrany
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03/03/2020 7:03 pm  

The pepper boy sure is a character.

He was actually in a dream of mine appearing as a sentient (alien) plant.  It was half disturbing and half cute itself.  He got larger and larger and while never anthropomorphic he communicated telepathically to us. 

We ended up having to hide him under the house in the crawlspace because he was dangerous.  I believe it was an inadvertent (alien) dangerous-ness though.

I always felt an affinity for plants and animals more than people. 

Chillies | Homemade Hot Chili Sauce Recipes

I apologise for the tangent ? 


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ignant666
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03/03/2020 7:55 pm  

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/hand-pollinating-peppers.htm

I've never had this problem but my peppers get plenty of wind, and insects. If i had a plant that ought to self-pollinate and wasn't, i would suspect stress. If you are growing in containers and the plant has been around for a while, it is probably root-bound. Re-pot with good organic potting soil into a pot at least 1/5 x bigger.

Gently pull out the roots that are growing in a circle round the circumference of the pot, and in a mat at the bottom, and distribute through the soil in new container- fill it perhaps a third of the way, work lowest roots into soil, add more soil, work in roots, and continue to top of roots/pot.

Then add water til it runs out the bottom, top up soil as needed post-wetting, make sure soil in container is "crowned"- highest around stem, lowest around edges (drainage).

My favorite fertilizer is fish emulsion. There are formulations that are high nitrogen, and others that are more even "N-P-K" (nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium). Almost all fertilizers will be labelled with these three N-P-K numbers.

For green veggies, and growth states of flowering/fruiting plants, you want the first (nitrogen) number highest. For fruiting and flowering plants, you want the middle number highest. So tomatoes, peppers, or flowering cannabis plants, want little nitrogen, lots of phosphorus, a bit of potassium. Your lawn, and lettuce, and pre-flowering/fruiting tomatoes, peppers, or flowering cannabis plants, want high nitrogen, moderate phosphorus and potassium. For those growing cannabis, bat guano, and seabird guano, are very popular. Both are available in high nitrogen, and high phosphorus, versions.

This is very oversimplified, and there are nuances, and caveats. Most can be taken care of by a supplement high in trace elements, like seaweed solution.


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christibrany
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03/03/2020 9:42 pm  

@ignant666

 

Very interesting thank you.

 

Pepper has lived in about 3 different pots now, as he gets bigger and bigger but then he stopped maybe a year ago so I think a bigger pot once again will be the answer.

 

If not then that's fine too.  Peppers be spicy. 

 

 

 


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ignant666
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03/03/2020 9:53 pm  

And try hand pollinating if re-potting doesn't work, which it sounds like it may not if he's moved before (but definitely do it anyway, those roots need room to breathe).


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ignant666
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03/03/2020 9:58 pm  
Posted by: @ignant666

So tomatoes, peppers, or flowering cannabis plants, want little nitrogen, lots of phosphorus, a bit of potassium. Your lawn, and lettuce, and pre-flowering/fruiting tomatoes, peppers, or flowering cannabis plants, want high nitrogen, moderate phosphorus and potassium.

Deleted underlined word, sorry sloppy copy and pasting (and poor proofreading too, of course)- then we get the correct, and non-contradictory:

Posted by: @ignant666

So tomatoes, peppers, or flowering cannabis plants, want little nitrogen, lots of phosphorus, a bit of potassium. Your lawn, and lettuce, and pre-flowering/fruiting tomatoes, peppers, or cannabis plants, want high nitrogen, moderate phosphorus and potassium.

 


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ignant666
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28/04/2020 8:31 pm  

Today is the first day it has been above 60 and not raining in weeks, so lots of work getting the veg garden planted.

Flowers are coming in in order, forsythia and daffodils mostly done, tulips about to go, then the irises and lilies and all the gang come in.

So far today have broken a garden fork (wood handle snapped), and a forged landscaping rake (metal snapped).

Will get corn, beans, watermelon, pumpkins, and zucchinis in today (i hope). My hops which are a perennial, are doing meh (Crystal), and fabulous (Fuggles), respectively.


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Shiva
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29/04/2020 8:16 pm  

Now that Spring has actually Sprung, what is the forecast/prophecy regarding the proliferation of Springbirds? Is this some different form of a pandemic? Will everyone but the chosen few produce a solution to II:76? Will we be left behind ... in The Old Aeon of sorrow and regret, with the folks who sigh and don't him as yet?


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Jamie J Barter
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29/04/2020 8:32 pm  
Posted by: @shiva

Now that Spring has actually Sprung, what is

It might perhaps not be of direct relevance, but I can't track down a more suitable thread at the moment and it still might have some tangential association, both things being of the Earth as it were: I was wondering if there have been any conclusive movements with regard to the Schumann resonance in respect of things generally and perhaps the pandemic specifically, or if there don't seem to have been any - what's that popular phrase again? Ah yes - "....meaningful coincidences"?

Upon this Eve of Walpurgisnacht,

Norma N Joy Conquest


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christibrany
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29/04/2020 9:14 pm  

@ignant666

 

We here be growin' :

 

Portuguese Cabbage

Green Onions

Bok Choy cabbage

Roses

Scorpion Pepper (THE Mr Pepper)

um.

Aloe Vera

Spider Plants

 

But they all be in pots. 

 

Our Tomato got Sacrificed.  

It actually lived for over a year, in a pot, and provided us with much Sustenance. 


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Shiva
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29/04/2020 10:34 pm  
Posted by: @jamiejbarter

I was wondering if there have been any conclusive movements with regard to the Schumann resonance

Right now, this very moment, we are in the middle of a shitstorm that has been increasingly violent. See for yourself ...

image

https://www.disclosurenews.it/en/schumann-resonance-today-update/

 

 

 


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christibrany
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29/04/2020 11:43 pm  

@shiva

 

Doktor, 

 

Does that mean my blood will get even thicker? 

 

Or perhaps my 'cabbage'?

 

:-/ 


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Tiger
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30/04/2020 12:16 am  

Dreams are real.
It's a matter of what is less real and unreal.
The eidetic can reduce the common world to shadows.
So abandon your self;
like a woman to love,
a man in spring;

grow.

 

I can hardly figure out whats what today.
Must be the storm.


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The HGA of a Duck
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11/10/2020 4:32 pm  
Posted by: @ignant666

These are two purple/black heirloom tomato varieties i can recommend:

https://www.seedsavers.org/black-krim-tomato

https://www.seedsavers.org/cherokee-purple-organic-tomato

 

 

Thanks for the Black Krim recommendation, here's the result:

tomato

 

Not bad. I've grown "black" tomatoes before, can't remember if this type was among them. The best varieties, flavour-wise that I've grown are 2 Yank heirloom ones, "Hillbilly" and "Brandywine". I may try them again next year. I remember the brandywine only gave a few tomatoes per plant but the flavour was top-quality and was actually a bit like red wine, which is probably why they gave it that name.

 

Posted by: @duck

One of them produced a "mutant" that gave the tomatoes a purplish hue. I thought that was cool so I saved some seeds from it to grow this year.

The "mutant" mutated again and produced another 3 different colour types: dark purple, yellow and even a green variety. I've grown a "green-when-ripe" variety before (Green Zebra) but didn't know the green mutation was this common. The yellow mutation seems to be fairly common.

tomato stele

 

("miraculous colour shall come back to it day after day")


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ignant666
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11/10/2020 5:03 pm  

All my tomatoes are gone from two early frosts last month, only the hops to pick and dry, and a few fall wildflowers left this year.

Glad the Black Krims worked out for you, and the Brandywines are good. I think the name comes from the Brandywine Valley region of Pennsylvania, where they may have originated.


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christibrany
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12/10/2020 8:54 pm  

@duck

Yeah we planted cherry tomatoes in planters outside on the porch and they got to almost chest height which was very pleasant.  We bought a yellow variety and a red variety and noticed that they were cross pollinating themselves and some of the 'wrong' colour was being grown from the other type.

 

Posted by: @ignant666

All my tomatoes are gone from two early frosts last month,

Pretty much similar here.  We have not had frosts yet but it has been cold enough that they are turning yellow.  Got the last harvest maybe a week ago.

We do have one planted indoors which is starting to fruit now since we planted him late.

 

 

Basil indoors is growing like a weed. Faster than we can use it.

Same thing with the Portuguese Cabbage, its tasty steamed, also indoors in a pot. 


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ignant666
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12/10/2020 9:00 pm  
Posted by: @christibrany

Basil indoors is growing like a weed. Faster than we can use it.

It won't flower and die unless it gets a short daylength, which indoors is never.

Surplus of basil? One word, son: pesto. Freeze any excess.


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christibrany
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12/10/2020 9:10 pm  

@ignant666

Posted by: @ignant666

Surplus of basil? One word, son: pesto. Freeze any excess.

OHhhhhh , I like pesto.

I will make a note.

It has already flowered in some spots but it doesn't seem to be dying. 


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ignant666
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12/10/2020 9:12 pm  

Snip off all flowers (and use in stir-frys, or anything else you would use basil in for that matter (including pesto)), and give the plant(s) more light at night, to continue leaf production.


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