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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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Joined: 12 years ago
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Topic starter  

i was curious if anyone of you here that like Lovecraft, had an internet forum in mind that you think is best in terms of lots of active participation and lots of members? I was looking for a place to discuss his work and also the mythos and other people's ideas about it and writings using it.
I can find a lot in google but the pt is I don't know which ones are worth joining and I don't want to waste my time.
thanks! ^^


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alysa
(@alysa)
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Joined: 13 years ago
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I think that's always the point with the Internet that you don't know which ones are worth joining and which ones not, I certainly think Lovecraft's work is worth studiying, I only still have to do it, it will be later in my life. . . but I have an interest in him.


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 915
 

You are best off checking out a few forums as a lurker then joining one (or more) when the urge to post strikes you. I don't have a specific forum recommendation however.

Its not a forum but for a great book on the Mythos, how it developed, how Lovecraft saw it, and how it was further explored by other writers check out "The Rise and Fall of the Cthulhu Mythos" by one of the most respected Lovecraft scholars S T Joshi. He also wrote "H.P. Lovecraft: A Life" the best biography on Lovecraft.

If you are interested I took a tour of Providence on Halloween 2008. There are photos on my flickr stream but here is an image of the house where the sculptor H.A. Wilcox lives in Call of Cthulhu.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/eindoppelganger/2997832199/in/set-72157608614079027/

If you are interested in combining Lovecraft's mythos with your Magickal practice perhaps check out the link to the Esoteric Order of Dagon
http://www.esotericorderofdagon.org/

Scott


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Durga23
(@durga23)
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Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 82
 

If you are interested in a literary story by story discussion of Lovecraft's work without the magical point of view - there is a wonderful podcast with a forum. The HP Lovecraft Literary Podcast http://hppodcraft.com/ It is very funny and informative about Lovecraft's life and works - they are up to the Call of Cthulhu at this point (episode 42!) I'm reading along.


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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Topic starter  

thanks all,
very interesting stuff here so far
i really really love your photos doppelganger thanks so much for them! i am in the midst of perusing and downloading a lot of them
the one of gov. hopkins red house on the hill is really beautiful. i love old buildings and things. im totally an antiquarian.
i got the bug from growing up in the netherlands and seeing all over europe for most of my life. i cant stand the newness of everything in the states, so the colonial states are the best next thing. i love the old archetecture in new england. so spooky feeling.

in regards to the E.:.O.:.D.:. i would love to join if only to have an interesting outlet for my fiction too, but the one problem that may not be a problem is I don't want to mess up my joining the A.:.A.:.
For some reason i get the idea or feeling that if you join one order you cannot join a second. I feel that being in my Student phase in the A.:.A.:. and already stating my intention to take the exam, that would forfeit me if I joined the EOD. is that wrong?

I like the tradition and most importantly the basis and solid groundwork and practicality I can get in the A.:.A.:. presumably, coming from a non magical background in daoism and bhakta hinduism. so i get the idea orders like the EOD, typhonian, chaos etc are for people that already have a firm grounding in magical practice.

correct me if im wrong.
but thanks again for the tips everyone. lots of interesting stuff


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

Hey Chris,

Ironically enough, back in the day I read what was on the reading list took the Student Exam for the same Liniage, I believe, of the A.'.A.'. (only for the Oath papers then I dropped contact) and now I am advancing in the Esoteric Order of Dagon....the one linked to in ein's post! Just as long as keep up with it all then I see nothing wrong with belonging to more than one, two, three, etc... Order's at a time.

A site dedicated to Ech-Pi-El that I like (now I don't really visit their forum I just read stories on the site) is here:

http://www.templeofdagon.com/

In the Night of Pan,


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

EDIT: that should read "just as long as One could keep up with it all"......

And yes, you are correct that the E.'.O.'.D, Typhonian Order, etc...are not "for beginner's". But don't forget "you have the potential"! 😀


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

there's a great interview with erik davis about his online course at the maybe logic academy on lovecraft and the imagination. you can stream or download it here:

http://c-realmpodcast.podomatic.com/entry/2009-10-28T08_27_05-07_00


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 

and I just read here and found out that I did not take the same student exam you are preparing for Chris, mine was taken with the Lineage in England, the outer college or whatever. That was just so I could use their Oath papers....Oaths were taken to the Secret Chiefs of course I just wanted a nice material reminder for myself.


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Joined: 12 years ago
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Here is a link to Dr Justin Woodman's lecture series on HPL and the Occult from Treadwell's bookstore
http://www.sffaudio.com/?p=1162

Just as an aside I envy those of you in London. Treadwells seems like a great epicenter for some really creative minds. The lectures and launch parties there look like a lot of fun .

Scott


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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EDIT: I meant to add this blog as well. Its updated quite often.

HP Lovecraft and his Legacy
http://chrisperridas.blogspot.com/


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Durga23
(@durga23)
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Thanks einDoppelganger for pointing out the link to Dr Justin Woodman's lecture series. Just listened to the first one. So much great stuff from Treadwells.


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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Topic starter  

yeah that lecture is great so far. esp. great for driving listening 🙂 thanks!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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I also want to thank you, ein, for posting the link to those podcast's. I wish that more lectures/talks and such from Treadwells would be recorded.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Perhaps you will find interest this site www.necronomicongnosis.gr, its my personal web page dedicated to the Cthulhu Mythos and its relation with the occult (especially C. Grant and Chaos Magic). Some of the articles are in Greek, which is my native language. Also, you can find there a rather big list with links for sites, forums and blogs that are related one way or another with the occult aspects of Lovecraftism.


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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Topic starter  

i have seen your site a good many times arpokratis. i stumbled on it awhile ago and i was very impressed with it. keep up the interesting good work! your essays in english on lovecraft and k grant are very good.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Thank you christibrany 🙂
I started my site (its actually a data base on occult lovecraftianism, with articles written by me and others) two years ago when I finished and published (here in Greece) my study about the Necronomicon and how actual magical orders make use of it! Nowadays, I’m writing the second volume – its about the correlation between the Great Old Ones theology/cosmology and the Qliphoths.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Γεια χαρά Αρποκράτη!

Welcome to LAShTAL.com!
I come from Thessaloniki (currently live in Athens though). Nice to meet you! I'll pay a visit to your site soon. 😉

Εκάτη


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Can you stomach the ultimate obscenity?

http://hilobrow.com/2010/05/03/cthulhu-is-not-cute/


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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Joined: 12 years ago
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Topic starter  

interesting article. i wish i hadnt seen the plush and the japanese animation though. it kind of ruins my horrific view of things. but the author of the essay is right too, it also adds to it. hmm the gates are thinning.


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James
(@james)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 251
 

Chris,

I'd heartily recommend the series of lectures by Dr. Justin Woodman given at Treadwells in London some time ago on HPL. Part of his research was to join a Chaos group working the mythos, this form part of the lecture series but there is much more and mainly about the man himself, Grant's work and historical context that sort of thing. If you google Dr Justin Woodman HPL Treadwells you'll get the podcasts they are free to download.

Regards

Jamie 🙂


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 
"alysa" wrote:
I think that's always the point with the Internet that you don't know which ones are worth joining and which ones not, I certainly think Lovecraft's work is worth studiying, I only still have to do it, it will be later in my life. . . but I have an interest in him.

Not to be a smartass, but who has guaranteed you a later in life? no time like the now Lovecraft gets better everyreading !!


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 915
 

zohabus speaks true!
🙂

By all means *read* his work. You must experience his prose first hand and if possible get the editions with footnotes by ST Joshi (Penguin editions).

With that said if you enjoy audiobooks let me recommend the Dark Worlds of HP Lovecraft series narrated by Wayne June. His voice is superb and he does a fantastic job with the stories. Wayne June is a fan and his affection and respect for the work comes across in his performance of the material.

http://www.amazon.com/Dark-Worlds-H-P-Lovecraft-Vol/dp/1897304005/ref=pd_sim_b_2

Scott


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SatansAdvocaat
(@satansadvocaat)
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Actually, einDoppelganger, I am very pleased that I read my HPL way before he became academically respectable and that my imagination was able to soar free and untrammelled by the burdens of academic footnotes.

Having said that, ST Joshi's footnotes are highly informative and very well worthwhile, although he does occasionaly get too clever for his own good and say daft things, especially regarding those esoteric areas with which he has no real empathy. Mind you there are Lovecraft scholars out there with even less sympathy for us deranged Lovecraftian magicians !

Yrs by the Sign of Koth,

Frater Joseph Curwen.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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SA,

Us Lovecraftian magickans aren't deranged.....well not too deranged, anyway! 😈

Fraternally,


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Satan'sAdvocaat: Yeah my first edition was a pulpy paperback with a suitably technicolor disco-surrealist cover. I may be biased because I picked up the annotated volumes while I was in Providence and the footnotes were particularly interesting because they referenced locations I could visit. I read "Dreams in the Witch House" while sitting having a latte at the Starbucks that now occupies the location of Lovecraft's birth house. Talk about ultimate evil.

Since then I have been revisiting a lot of my favorite works in annotated form because they add a new dimension to my reading of the text. This is of course after my initial unfiltered experience so you may well have a good point.

I have detected a degree of arrogance in ST Joshi I am not comfortable with. I seem to recall him making blanket statements about previous Lovecraft biographers which I found annoying since I have an affection for L Sprague DeCamp's biography on HPL.

Scott
Frater H.A. Wilcox


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alysa
(@alysa)
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Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 655
 

Alright, I'm a newcomer to H.P.Lovecraft, and still have many other books to read, I've two books by Lovecraft "The Loved Dead" and "The Whisperer in Darkness", Introduction with M.J.Elliott, any good you'd think. . .


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 
"N.O.X" wrote:
SA,

Us Lovecraftian magickans aren't deranged.....well not too deranged, anyway! 😈

Fraternally,

I suggested Lovecraftian magickans or 'Lovecraftian magick' as a theme for the PhD thesis of an Egyptologist friend of mine preparing for a PhD in Religious Sciences. I have never seen him so angry before.

Strange, as he is a practitioner inspired by Dion Fortune.


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SatansAdvocaat
(@satansadvocaat)
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Thanks wellredwellbred, that gave me a good laugh !

Too much slime in the aura involved in Lovecraftian magick for a Society of the Inner Light type, I suspect. Gives me vague recollections of sitting in on a talk by Marian Green on the subject of ritual purification, or something of similar ilk, she made some comment about magic having nothing to do with trafficking [my term, not hers] with slimy, hideous beings... and I was the only one who laughed out loud.

Hi Alysa ! Difficult to say what might be in your Lovecraft compilations, there are so many.

"The Loved Dead" is the title of one of his collaborations/ghost writing jobs, and therefore, not typical, as may be the case with the rest of the compilation.

"The Whisperer in Darkness" is hardcore Cthulhu Mythos, so you should be OK there. Love him, or hate him, let us know what you think.

Regards - S.A.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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I often post threads regarding HPL, Cthulhu Mythos, and the Occult relevance on Paganspace.net are you a member?


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
Yuggothian
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 2837
Topic starter  

no. i never heard of it until someone named alrah posted a link. and from what i saw it turned me off majorly. not really a fan of social networking sites. and the people there seemed a bit artificial in their understanding. but that is just my opinion and is also a bit of a quick judgment. but at least I'm honest about what pops into my head. i will give it another look.

My recco for first HPL book to get is a paperback (affordable) with his 'best' stories in it (true imho) called The Best of H. P. Lovecraft: Bloodcurdling Tales of Horror and the Macabre http://www.amazon.com/dp/0345350804/?tag=borders-detail-20


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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In all fairness, that's a pretty good assessment (of the general membership) but there are some diamonds in the rough and some fairly decent discussions (mine included). I was a member of the Cult of Cthulhu for a while, but I ill-advise it, and I will not give it a positive review for the serious occultist. As far as recommending decent venues for more scholarly discussions, sadly I couldn't recommend a single site. I am however willing to discuss it if you are interested. I don't generally subscribe to most post-Lovecraft mythos writers, I tend to stay within the framework of his original stories coined 'mythos' later on. I have a strong focus on the occult philosophy within the symbolism he created, whether intentionally or unintentionally.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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http://www.slide.com/r/1WHvwrxV6j-zTR7ZmDfijePRmF7gf0Fc

A link to the making of my Cthulhu Idol.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
 


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
Yuggothian
Joined: 12 years ago
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Topic starter  

just a quickie cus I have to go soon but thanks for sharing your thoughts and also the photos. Thats a very cool idol there. Very unique interpretation, I like it. more later. thanks again


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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Ha ha, I made this years ago.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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"SIN" wrote:
In all fairness, that's a pretty good assessment (of the general membership) but there are some diamonds in the rough and some fairly decent discussions (mine included). I was a member of the Cult of Cthulhu for a while, but I ill-advise it, and I will not give it a positive review for the serious occultist. As far as recommending decent venues for more scholarly discussions, sadly I couldn't recommend a single site. I am however willing to discuss it if you are interested. I don't generally subscribe to most post-Lovecraft mythos writers, I tend to stay within the framework of his original stories coined 'mythos' later on. I have a strong focus on the occult philosophy within the symbolism he created, whether intentionally or unintentionally.

I'm a member of that site though I don't post anything on there, I haven't read or contributed to any of the threads either; generally I couldn't give a stuff about the opinions of folk who call themselves things like "Raven Moonwolf" or bollocks like that. 😆

Re the post Lovecraft mythos writers, I pretty much agree with you, Ramsey Campbell once wrote that it's "...easy to imitate Lovecraft's more obvious stylistic mannerisms and some of his ideas" and that's more often than not what passes for "Mythos" writing; unintentional (or otherwise) pastiche. Having said that, there is some great work out there, I particularly like the Creation Books anthologies; "The Starry Wisdom" and the wonderfully titled "Songs of the Black Wurm Gism", featuring talented writers and artists like William S. Burroughs, J.G Ballard, James Havoc, John Coulthart, Alan Moore etc. One of my favourites from the afore mentioned works is Moore's story "The Courtyard" later released as a comic by the excellent Avatar Press, the sequel, "Neonomicon" is out this Summer (a slim, preview issue is available now, well worth a look.).


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 Anonymous
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 Anonymous
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Daniel Harms makes a pretty good attempt at the 'mythos' analysis, in his Encyclopedia. He breaks down what 'most people' consider mythos, without he himself telling the readers what is and isn't part of the mythos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Harms

I agree, it is pretty easy to imitate the style, and Lovecraftian symbolism appears in the strangest of places sometimes. Most recently in that cheesy movie 'Mortuary', only one scene, but it was jaw dropping none-the-less. Super-cheesy.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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"SIN" wrote:
Daniel Harms makes a pretty good attempt at the 'mythos' analysis, in his Encyclopedia. He breaks down what 'most people' consider mythos, without he himself telling the readers what is and isn't part of the mythos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Harms

I agree, it is pretty easy to imitate the style, and Lovecraftian symbolism appears in the strangest of places sometimes. Most recently in that cheesy movie 'Mortuary', only one scene, but it was jaw dropping none-the-less. Super-cheesy.

I've heard of Harm's but never read any of his work; I've been meaning to get a copy of "The Necronomicon Files" since it came out. 😆 another to add to the list.

One of the things I like about the anthologies I mentioned is that rather than using Cthulhu or the Necronomicon or any of the familiar mythos devices, the stories create a subtle, suggestive ambience complementing the ones that use more familiar Lovecraftian tropes.,
I'll have to check "Mortuary" out as well.


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 915
 

Speaking of films which evoke the sense of "cosmic dread" so integral to HPL...It has its flaws but I highly recommend
"Sauna."

It succeeds without ever becoming a pastiche or even seeming to consciously try to be "Lovecraftian." I have been saying its like a film made by David Lynch and HPL.


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alysa
(@alysa)
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Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 655
 

Got another one by H.P. Lovecraft "The Horror in the Museum", Introduction also by M.J. Elliott, Wordsworth Editions, any book of interest you think?


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
Yuggothian
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 2837
Topic starter  

there are a couple of awesome stories in that book alysa that you definitely need to read.
one is the Diary of Alonzo Typer by William Lumley and HPL
the other one is The Mound by Zealia Bishop and HPL
there are one or two other awesome noes but those two are the best in there in my opinion that every horror/supernatural fiction fan will like
take cares
chris


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mika
 mika
(@mika)
Member
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Posts: 360
 

Speaking of "Lovecraftian" media, I'd like to again pimp my friend Kij Johnson's story Spar, for which she recently won the Nebula and is currently in the running for a Hugo.

http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/johnson_10_09/

Enjoy!


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alysa
(@alysa)
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Posts: 655
 

I think you just made available a terrific interesting link, Mika, I also think your friend a very good author, is this story also available in book form, cause I prefer reading form a book, rather than from a computer screen, best wishes, Alysa


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mika
 mika
(@mika)
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Posts: 360
 

Hi Alysa
Thanks. No, it's only available online, at least for now. But hey, it's only a handful of paragraphs long.

There's some interest in turning it into a graphic novel (naturally) but who knows if/how/when.


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alysa
(@alysa)
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Posts: 655
 

Just saw this advertised on Anathema "The Lovecraft Necronomicon Primer", subtitled 'A Guide to the Chtullu Mythos', by T. Allan Bilstad, I think this might be of interest both to the beginner as to the more advanced student of Lovecraft.


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SatansAdvocaat
(@satansadvocaat)
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OK, I wasn't going to indulge today - but its all your fault Alysa, honestly!

Could not resist checking out this "The Lovecraft Necronomicon Primer" - and its available on google books. I know it says its a primer - often an excuse to turn out poor and superficial writing in return for a quick buck - but this one sucks. Unless you're straight out of the little shoggoth's nursery, don't waste your time with this one.

On a more positive note, I've just checked out the Wikipedia entry for "The Dreams in the Witch-House" and it gives it really poor press - apparently Derleth did not like it, which I didn't know. Personally, I think its great, both in its concepts and its imagery.

Regards - S.A.


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Michael Staley
(@michael-staley)
MANIO - it's all in the egg
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 4119
 
"Satan'sAdvocaat" wrote:
On a more positive note, I've just checked out the Wikipedia entry for "The Dreams in the Witch-House" and it gives it really poor press - apparently Derleth did not like it, which I didn't know. Personally, I think its great, both in its concepts and its imagery.

The Dreams in the Witch-House is probably my favourite Lovecraft story. I love the concept of the angles of the room being connections between dimensions, and the means for the witch and her famiiar to cross from dream. It's one of several Lovecraft stories which for me really fire the imagination - others amongst many are Beyond the Wall of Sleep, At the Mountains of Madness, The Whisperer in Darkness, and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward.

Beyond the Wall of Sleep has for me a particularly inspirational passage early on:

. . . From my experience, I cannot doubt but that man, when lost to terrestrial consciousness, is indeed sojurning in another and uncorporeal life of far different nature from the life we know, and of which only the slightest and most indistinct memories exist after waking . . . We may guess that in dreams life, matter, and vitality, as the earth knows such things, are not necessarily constant; and that time and space do not exist as our waking selves comprehend them. Sometimes I believe that this less material life is our truer life, and that our vain presence on this terraqueous globe is itself the secondary or merely virtual phenomenon.

I've always loved the sense of wonder which is the driving force behind artistic creation. Lovecraft expressed this admirably in the course of a letter to Clark Ashton Smith in 1930:

. . . The true function of phantasy is to give the imagination a ground for limitless expansion, & to satisfy aesthetically the sincere & burning curiosity and sense of awe which a sensitive minority of mankind feel towards the alluring & provocative abysses of unplumbed space and unguessed entity which press in upon the known world from unknown infinities & in unknown relationships of time, space, matter, force, dimensionality, & consciousness.

Re Derleth, although he was a part of the Lovecrat circle of writers, and completed several unfinished stories after Lovecraft's death, I've never really taken to his additions to the Lovecraft pantheon.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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einDoppelganger
(@eindoppelganger)
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Posts: 915
 

Derleth is not known for his taste or talent. 🙂 He was the guy who imposed Christian concepts of good and evil on stories horrifying for their pervasive sense of existential dread... talk about missing the point... 🙄 He did a lot of good though I admit.

I have to say I disagree with the press cited in the wiki for the story. Dreams in the Witch House is brilliant. It is one of my favorite HPL tales actually. It does lack the subtlety of Call of Cthulhu. On the other hand it is very creative in its explorations of hyperspace, "wrong" geometry, and the blending / bending of science and horror. I'm also a fan of the very special guest star that makes an appearance.

I must recommend anyone who is just approaching HPL you must read Great God Pan by Arthur Machen. It was a huge influence on Lovecraft's ideas and presentation. Great God Pan was Lovecraftian before there was a Lovecraftian. Of course Machen was in the GD but his interest seemed to have waned.

Scott


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