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Umberto Eco - Prague Cemetery  


einDoppelganger
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Just wanted to point out to those interested that Umberto Eco's The Prague Cemetery is in paperback now and looks well worth a read, especially if you enjoyed Foucalt's Pendulum. Prague Cemetery traces the creation of "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion" through a veritable "who's who" of 19th century occult, anarchist, political, and social circles. See appearances by all your favorites including Abbe Boullan, the lovable Leo Taxil, and the lovely Diana Vaughan.
Thanks WilliamThirteen for mentioning this book ages ago here. I can't wait to read it.
If you have - keep the thread "spoiler free" 😉

einD


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eol
 eol
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Enjoy your reading. Such a fun book that you just can't stop reading. Jesuits, Freemasons... you name it. 😀


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anarchistbanjo
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Thanks,

This is great! I saw the hard copy a few months ago at Barnes and Noble but it was gone a few weeks later when I went back. I'm beginning to get very curious about Prague since quite a few German authors wrote novels about it including Meyrink and Strobl. I will definitely keep an eye out for it.


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SatansAdvocaat
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I think my local library has acquired a copy of this; I flicked it through the other day and thought, do I really want to put myself through another smart-arsed, hyper-intellectual outing into the imagined labyrinths of occult history only to be peevishly pissed off at the 'going nowhere' ending as I was with Foucault's Pendulum, (Fuck All's Ding-Dong, I'd call it, if Paul will allow me to get away with this).

Prague looks like a truly magical place and an afternoon spent in the actual 'Prague Cemetery' would put this into perspective any day.


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Markus
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Foucault's Pendulum is a great read and one of the best mockeries of the Occult I have ever come across. In particular, the humour is simply awesome. However, once you've read one of his books, you've read them all. In addition, Eco is an arrogant smart arse who indulges in intellectual masturbation. He is - to use a polite British term - a total tosser.

Markus


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Los
 Los
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"Markus" wrote:
Foucault's Pendulum is a great read and one of the best mockeries of the Occult I have ever come across. In particular, the humour is simply awesome. However, once you've read one of his books, you've read them all.

I'll second all of this.


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einDoppelganger
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Hearty LOL at the last three replies. I quit enjoyed Foucalt's Pendulum and followed it up with McIntosh's  Eliphas Levi and the French Occult Revival, which made for a nice pairing. I do absolutely see how he is all too pleased with himself sometimes. Its funny because what he seemed to do in Foucalt's Pendulum Alan Moore did in From Hell, albeit in reverse. Moore managed to deconstruct and debunk his own carefully crafted occult conspiracy without ever having to talk down to the reader. A few times I felt Eco was more than a little thrilled with himself. I did enjoy the book though...

einD


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anarchistbanjo
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I managed to pick up the only remaining copy at a local Barnes and Noble and began dipping into it last night. Based on my early impressions I remain open but a bit reserved. Simply put, he is now playing with themes and historical events that many of us have formed our own fairly extensive opinions on. I'm not sure how that will work out, especially if there is some conflict. I sense that I might be hyper critical and have already tried to adjust for it.

As a translator, I had to chuckle at the opening sentence which is twelve lines long! Amazing that people still write that way.


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einDoppelganger
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Well, he aint no Dan Brown 😉

lulz 😛


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Markus
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"einDoppelganger" wrote:
Well, he aint no Dan Brown 😉

Agreed. Dan Brown might be a poor stylist, but at least he's a reliable historiographer.

Markus


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belmurru
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"Markus" wrote:
"einDoppelganger" wrote:
Well, he aint no Dan Brown 😉

Agreed. Dan Brown might be a poor stylist, but at least he's a reliable historiographer.

Markus

Prize for the driest sarcasm I've read in weeks. Bravo!


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William Thirteen
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Prague Cemetery was my first Eco - as I very, very rarely read fiction - but I enjoyed it thoroughly.


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einDoppelganger
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Agreed. Dan Brown might be a poor stylist, but at least he's a reliable historiographer.

*lol*
Oh come on now... Even if you dislike Eco, what in Foucalt's Pendulum do you think is incorrect or unreliable in terms of an occult historiography compared to Dan Brown's  middle-class beach reading repackaging of "Holy Blood, Holy Grail?" Once can hardly even call Brown a historiographer by comparison! Now you are just being mean to the old Italian 😛


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SatansAdvocaat
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The Prague Cemetery turned up again in the library, so I borrowed it; might even give it a read too.  At least it has pictures!


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 Anonymous
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[Moderator's Note: Spamming post deleted and member banned following repeated warnings.]


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