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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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11/10/2006 5:16 am  

93
Please excuse my writing and sintax, english is not my first language.

I'm currently studying philosophy at college, two more years and that's it, so it is time for me to start researching on my thesis. My favorite topic is Thelema of course, and what I'm trying to do with my profesional life is to bring thelema to academic philosophy, or the other way around, academic philosophy to Thelema, I know that's what I want to do, I've never been so sure of something.

But! there's always a but, I don't know of anyone who has ever tried to do something like that, this scares me, I'd like to start my thesis, or my research, by already having some material of early attempts, meaning, of other authors, philosophers (from academic philosophy) who have already done something similar, perhaps mentioning thelema in regards of some other subject.

That's why I come to you, Oh wise men (and women), for help, could anyone please point me to some philosopher that has discussed thelema in terms of western academic philosophy?, or perhaps of a thelemite that has done some work by bringing thelema to philosophy or philosophy to Thelema?

It would mean a lot to me and it would ease my spirit, I'm afraid of failure I must admit, for this task seems to me (due to my ignorance) as a herculean effort, I've already written extensively in spanish (in my site http://www.ohem.ne t"> http://www.ohem.net ) in many essays and articles linking thelema to academic philosophy, to Nietzsche, to Heidegger, etc., but a thesis is not to be taken lightly (specially a philosophical thesis), since I'm planning on studying a masters degree ("maestría" in spanish, I'm not sure what the proper translation would be) my thesis must reflect my hopes in terms of my future career.

Any asistance will be greatly appreciated (I can read english fluidly, so don't worry). Thank you.

93/93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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13/10/2006 6:28 am  

93
No one?, not even a hint or a thought?, perhaps an essay?, nothing at all?

93/93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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13/10/2006 12:41 pm  

WARNING: PRE-COFFEE RAMBLE WITH NO SPELL CHECK *sigh*

93 asclepio,

Since this is obviously important to you I will give what little guidence I have for you; then, when I have posted, others will come and disect and dismantle what I have said and perhaps from that carnage you will find wisdom.

I am, for better or worse, interested in Crowley both on a personal and academic level. However, my background in Philosophy is rather limited and therefor so shall the impact of my suggestions (I assume Academic Philosophy refers to philosophy taught at a university and not a particular branch of philosophy). My suggestion would be to pick one philosopher that Crowley uses often (I would suggest checking out the list given in Liber XV for ideas) and analyse how that thought imapacted on Crowley's. Or, more specifically, look at one particular aspect of a philosopher, say Friedrich Nietzsche's notion of will, and compare an aspect of that with Thelema. The problem is that Crowley was so well read and Thelema so complicated (convoluted?) that when studied from an academic perspective they become potential sources for migraines.

I will be so bold as to suggest that you pick a differnent topic for you academic study as the Academy has a way of killing whatever lust or joy you have for a subject. That said, I would have it no other way. The Academy forces you to view a very dear subject from many different angels and many of them disquieting to one's spiritual tranquility.

Begin with what you love about Crowley's thought and Thelema then figure out what you love about philosophy. I am sure something will make itself known to you. Then its simply a matter of convincing your advisor that Crowley was not insane and is a viable academic subject (then thank many of the good folks here for paving the way, in their own manner, for all of us to continue this Great Work).

93 93/93
NH418


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the_real_simon_iff
(@the_real_simon_iff)
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13/10/2006 1:33 pm  

93 asclepio!

I am not sure where philosophy ends and where religion begins, but there are a lot of articles out there that explore Aleister Crowley and Thelema in a very scientific way. Here are two I own but with Google Scholar you will find more.

"A comparison of the writings of Aleister Crowley and C.G.Jung" by Lloyd Kenton Keane, B.A.

"The Beast with Two Backs: Aleister Crowley and the Exhaustion of Modernity" by Hugh B. Urban

In Germany there have been quite a few thesises written on A.C. so I am sure in the English/Spanish speaking world there are even more.

Also I would try to find as much as you can of what AC had to say on "academic philosophy" (he wrote countless essays) and then maybe follow "Thelema" and its origins in Christianity to Rabelais and Crowley. This could become an enormous task. If your thesis must reflect your hopes in terms of your future career, it would be interesting what these hopes are. I am afraid there might be not too much philosophy job offers for a Crowley expert.

Well, I will look if I have any other ideas that might help.

Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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13/10/2006 3:11 pm  
"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
93 asclepio!

I am not sure where philosophy ends and where religion begins, but there are a lot of articles out there that explore Aleister Crowley and Thelema in a very scientific way. Here are two I own but with Google Scholar you will find more.

"A comparison of the writings of Aleister Crowley and C.G.Jung" by Lloyd Kenton Keane, B.A.

"The Beast with Two Backs: Aleister Crowley and the Exhaustion of Modernity" by Hugh B. Urban

In Germany there have been quite a few thesises written on A.C. so I am sure in the English/Spanish speaking world there are even more.

Also I would try to find as much as you can of what AC had to say on "academic philosophy" (he wrote countless essays) and then maybe follow "Thelema" and its origins in Christianity to Rabelais and Crowley. This could become an enormous task. If your thesis must reflect your hopes in terms of your future career, it would be interesting what these hopes are. I am afraid there might be not too much philosophy job offers for a Crowley expert.

Well, I will look if I have any other ideas that might help.

Love=Law
Lutz

93

Lutz:

That is a great article and Urban's book Tantra is another good source. His C.V. is impressive:

http://comparativestudies.osu.edu/faculty/fac_core_urban.cf m"> http://comparativestudies.osu.edu/faculty/fac_core_urban.cfm

asclepio: it occurs to me, following Lutz's post that you may want to look at the philosophy of religion. That way Crowley would fit in nicely.

93 93/93

NH418


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
13/10/2006 4:54 pm  

Hi Asclepio,

I was informed today by my University tutor that Google are running a search engine called Google Scholar! It is still Beta. Just type in what you want and it should bring up something in relation to your task and hopefully it will be of of some academic help.

Let us know how you get on and good luck! 😉


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
13/10/2006 6:00 pm  

Nietzsche and Thomas Henry Huxley influenced crowley a lot.

Look up Liber Os vel Abysmi (or something similar to that) for some philosophy works he recommends to read.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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13/10/2006 7:05 pm  

Asclepio,

Looks like you've already had some help here, but I'll pitch in where I can and add another reference to the list, this one from Michigan State University (though I'm a product of OSU myself!)

The journal is called 'Esoterica' and is actually hosted from the MSU site. You can find it here.

Specifically, here are the crowley related articles:

Unleashing the Beast: Aleister Crowley, Tantra, and Sex Magic in Late Victorian England

The Art of the Law: Aleister Crowley's Use of Ritual and Drama

There are likely many more of interest.

Go Bucks!
J


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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13/10/2006 7:29 pm  

Ah - almost forgot. Another source you may find useful is 'The Art of Memory' by Frances Yates and 'Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Traditon' by the same author. You'll get alot of background from those two books and also an idea about how you want to put things together.. plus - interesting reads in themselves.

J


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
13/10/2006 7:51 pm  
"Jerry" wrote:
Ah - almost forgot. Another source you may find useful is 'The Art of Memory' by Frances Yates and 'Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Traditon' by the same author. You'll get alot of background from those two books and also an idea about how you want to put things together.. plus - interesting reads in themselves.

J

Another good Bruno source is Giordano Bruno and the Kabbalah: Prophets, Magicians, and Rabbis by de Leon-Jones. Well at least I found it useful 🙂


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
13/10/2006 8:15 pm  

93
Wow, thanks for the response, you've been a real help and I'll be studying all this material as soon as possible.

I also have, in my college, a contest of philosophical essays, the top ten essays will be published, and I'm planning on doing it on Crowley, commentaries on verse I:44, from Heidegger, to Nietzsche to the idea of time in spirituality, and the relationship between Time and Will. I already have a first draft in my site, if anyone here can read spanish revews will be appreciated: http://www.ohem.net/thelema/interpretacion%20del%20I.htm

Thanks for all the support, it really means a lot, since I love and lust academic philosophy, but also thelema, it's marriage will be, specially in the hispanic world, a true breakthrough (specially in latin america).

93/93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
13/10/2006 9:43 pm  
"Jerry" wrote:
Ah - almost forgot. Another source you may find useful is 'The Art of Memory' by Frances Yates and 'Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Traditon' by the same author. You'll get alot of background from those two books and also an idea about how you want to put things together.. plus - interesting reads in themselves.

Oh, yes! Exactly the same books and tips came to my mind.
I would add a book by Ioan Culianu (translated to Spanish as "Eros y Magia en el Renacimiento" -ed. Siruela)... and even if he's in the margins of philosophy, Georges Bataille's "Historia de la Religión" (history of religion).
This last one by Bataille... I wouldn't ignore this last one; his ideas about sacrifice and religion MAY become quite useful (or not, depending on the point of view of your thesis).

Some other good books published in Spanish on the subject of "Occult philosophy meets modern academic Philosophy":

-"Cabala y Deconstrucción" (Harold Bloom, Gershom Scholem, Moshe Idel)
[with interesting hints about Qabalah and Derrida]

-"Magia y Hermetismo" by Ernesto Prinai Saiso
[which is a good history of the Hermetic Tradition].

-"De filósofos, magos y brujas" by Esther Cohen
[probably the less useful of these books... though it's still useful. It's mostly the feminist point of view trying to re-write the history of magic, sometimes offering interesting points of view, sometimes getting a bit absurd... but it's an interesting book].

These 3 last books were published by "Editorial Azul".


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kidneyhawk
(@kidneyhawk)
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13/10/2006 10:47 pm  

Incorporating Bloom can only be a good thing...and do we know, has Bloom EVER mentioned or referenced Crowley?


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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13/10/2006 11:37 pm  
"kidneyhawk" wrote:
Incorporating Bloom can only be a good thing...and do we know, has Bloom EVER mentioned or referenced Crowley?

As far as I know, he didn't... I might be wrong.
But in this book I've mentioned (in which only one article is by Bloom), there are very interesting ideas about deconstructionism and Kabbalah... it shouldn't be too complicated to build a link between Kabbalah and Crowley, that's what I had in mind. I think it would be insane to try to do a doctoral thesis about Thelema using only authors who have referenced Crowley! (the most interesting thesis that fits into academic philosphy I've read about the Zos-Kia links Austin Spare with Gilles Deleuze... who never mentioned Spare in his books! )

Another article is by Gerschom Scholem, if you have read any of his books, then you already know that he HATES the magical use of Qabalah; and yet his essay in this book offers interesting ideas about philosophy and Qabalah (which, imho, are worthy).


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kidneyhawk
(@kidneyhawk)
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14/10/2006 2:34 am  

...and I'm sure YOU are much better read in Bloom than myself, which is why I asked! 🙂 Despite his love (and super-genius analysis of figures Crowley also took great influence from), I didn't think Bloom would be personally sympathetic to the Beast. I believe Bloom once called himself a "Jewish Gnostic" and whereas his work shows a personal mystical passion for his subjects through the acedemia, I could also see elements of Crowley's Magick not setting well with him and the genius of AC being overlooked as a pursuit not worth his time. This is just my impression. I think it may be worth Asclepios time to actually write to Bloom and put out the question, though...perhaps a far stretch but maybe a reply would find a place into the Thesis?

I wasn't implying that all references should be to Crowley or Thelema. I think in Asclepios original post there was a sense of searching for a decent reference point in the academic context to add a little credence to the overall work (and Asclepios, if this doesn't pan out, maybe YOU are such an academic reference point for future studies!).

the most interesting thesis that fits into academic philosphy I've read about the Zos-Kia links Austin Spare with Gilles Deleuze... who never mentioned Spare in his books!

Perhaps this approach is a very good one to take-the compartive study-how AC's work develops the influential stream of thinking from Nietzsche, for example, and extends the implications of that "existential" system. I think examining Crowley in terms of Taoism is also a possible option. A thesis on Taoism and Thelema, making a strong academic link between AC (as a proponent of Thelemic Thought, foreshadowed or downright embodied in others who came before and have been accepted into the corpus of academia) and Traditional Taoism with its sundry philosophical implications and developments?

These are just thoughts...as I reread your first post, I thought about the difference between Crowley and Thelema...and the discussions which have surfaced from time to time on Lashtal regarding Thelema BEFORE Crowley. Perhaps the link between Thelema and Academic Philosophy is Aleister Crowley himself-an extraordinarily educated man, a syncretic genius and one who explored in many writings fundemental philosophic concerns and saw them linking and superceded by the ideas contained in Thelema.

I wish you the very best with your paper and I think we'll all be quite excited to hear how it turns out!!!

93

Kyle


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 Anonymous
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14/10/2006 3:48 am  

Yea. Is it too much to ask for an English translation after you are done? 😉


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 Anonymous
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15/10/2006 2:59 pm  

Dear Kidneyhawk,

I'd be very interested to hear how you think there exists a connection between Taoism and Thelema. Academically at least, the two schools couldn't be more at odds and little relation exists between modern Taoist sects like the Falun-dafa and current OTO.

I'd be truly amazed if anybody could produce a thesis on this. Would enjoy reading one all the same.

93

Klaw


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ianrons
(@ianrons)
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15/10/2006 4:57 pm  

For info, see also here.


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 Anonymous
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15/10/2006 7:14 pm  

Thanks for your comments.

I'm aware of the magical/inspirational connections Crowley thought existed between Thelema and Taoism but this would be very difficult to contest academically. Which is what this thread is about. I'm sure one could eek out a common doctrinal strand here and there which could result in something interesting, but would it be concerning Thelema or Crowley?

Love under will and the need to exceed, force and fire, et al, is really quite off sync with 'the way' as propounded by Laotzu and practised by Taoists (old and new). I personally don't see much in common between AL and the Tao-te Ching. Perhaps I'm not bending the metaphors into their opposites sufficently.

The Taoist School is a Religion that has endured some 3,500 yrs, when one considers the previous movements that gave birth to it.

Thelema is a (religion, cult, magical philosophy)? that proclaims the advent and end of a period of 2000 yrs. There currently appears to be no consensus among adherents as to what constitutes Thelema's 'religious canon' (ABCD publications?) or the works of A. Crowley in general. There seems to be further confusion as to whether Thelema's central document (the Book of the Law) was authored by Crowley or Aiwass.

There exist different 'sects' within every religious tradition. There appear to be 4 associated with Thelema (that is, four popular OTO organisations). Two of these don't actually accept Thelema and the other two appear to be trying to stamp each other out of existence. In short, ideas on doctrine and philosophy (or whatever you like) appear incredibly divided. Is this the natural way or survival of the fittest!

I could envisage something of a thesis on the impact of Taoism on Crowley's own thought but not (with my current understanding) a similarity existing within Thelema. I think you'd have to be your own advisor to pass that one...

93 (from the true sect)

Klaw


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Michael Staley
(@michael-staley)
MANIO - it's all in the egg
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 4053
15/10/2006 7:50 pm  
"m.klaw" wrote:
I'm aware of the magical/inspirational connections Crowley thought existed between Thelema and Taoism but this would be very difficult to contest academically. Which is what this thread is about. I'm sure one could eek out a common doctrinal strand here and there which could result in something interesting, but would it be concerning Thelema or Crowley?

It would be concerning Thelema, which is in fact the natural order of things. I paraphrase, since the relevant book is not to hand, but Crowley commented on Thelema as the "law" which bids stars to shine, trees to fruit, and water to find its own level. We're talking here about an affinity of ideas which is readily apparent from a reading of the Tao Teh King. It is of no great moment to me whether or not this apparent on an academic or doctrinal level. It exists on an intuitive and mystical level.

"m.klaw" wrote:
Love under will and the need to exceed, force and fire, et al, is really quite off sync with 'the way' as propounded by Laotzu and practised by Taoists (old and new). I personally don't see much in common between AL and the Tao-te Ching. Perhaps I'm not bending the metaphors into their opposites sufficently.

Perhaps you're not; but you certainly are caricaturing. Thelema has, like just about any other current, many aspects. I agree that sentiments such as 'force and fire', 'exceed, exceed, but ever unto me' do not sit easily with Taoism. But these are in my opinion secondary expressions of Thelema.

"m.klaw" wrote:
Thelema is a (religion, cult, magical philosophy)? that proclaims the advent and end of a period of 2000 yrs. There currently appears to be no consensus among adherents as to what constitutes Thelema's 'religious canon' (ABCD publications?) or the works of A. Crowley in general. There seems to be further confusion as to whether Thelema's central document (the Book of the Law) was authored by Crowley or Aiwass.

There is not "confusion", but difference of opinion, which is a different thing. Thelema does not proclaim a period that endures for 2000 years - that is one interpretation amongst many. You don't need to be particularly percipient to work out that there is an intimate relationship between Crowley and Aiwass.

"m.klaw" wrote:
There exist different 'sects' within every religious tradition. There appear to be 4 associated with Thelema (that is, four popular OTO organisations). Two of these don't actually accept Thelema and the other two appear to be trying to stamp each other out of existence. In short, ideas on doctrine and philosophy (or whatever you like) appear incredibly divided. Is this the natural way or survival of the fittest!

Firstly, I assume that when you talk of two OTOs which are trying to stamp each other out, you are talking about the Caliphate O.T.O. and the Typhonian O.T.O. There may not be a lot of love lost at the moment; but as a member of the Typhonian O.T.O. I know that we are not trying to "stamp out" the Caliphate, and nor do I believe that they are trying to "stamp out" us.

By the way, am I talking to Morris Klaw of Sax Rohmer fame?


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 Anonymous
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15/10/2006 8:25 pm  

Dear Mr Staley,

Yes, I'm aware of these intuitive connections as mentioned at the head of the previous post. This is all good and well. But how you'd expect this material to stand up and wash its own face academically I've no idea.

You are indeed speaking to Morris Klaw 'of Sax Rohmer fame'.


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 Anonymous
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15/10/2006 9:23 pm  

93
I don't know much about Taoism, but I've read that Heidegger (XX century philosopher) was the only western philosopher to actually understand Tao. Although the theme of my thesis is still sketchy while preparing my paper (due november 6) my feeling that Thelema "fits" in the world of academic philosophy grows stronger by the day.

For instance: Heidegger says "man is "thrown" to this world, he did not choose this world, the world has been interpreted for him before his birth, and yet during his life he can not but interpret the world around him", sound pretty simple right? Wrong! Man, since is "thrown" has no purpose revealed to him since birth, he must find his being, himself, and he does that by "living authentically", this means rise above the world's interpretation of the world and of him, (if you know hermeneutics, you'll understand this right away). This means individual, rather than community (catholicism and judaism) or society (protestantism), the eon of horus would be the eon of the individual.

Man ("Dasein" in heidegger's words) interprets the beings at the same time that beings (the "world") interprets him, ordinarily man forces beings, instead of letting being speak for itself, (the concept of truth "aletheia" as the Being that reveals and occults itself), Heidegger then asks himself "how can I let Being reveal itself? By not talking or interpreting for the being, but allowing Being to talk by itself", and where and how does Being reveals itself? In art.

Art is born from the Will, but a Will not in the sense of wanting something to be something else, but a Will that is unassuaged of purpose, delivered from the lust of result (Magick anyone?).

If that has anything to do with Taoism I don't know, but what I do know is that Thelema can be delivered to academic philosophy because thelema is philosophy, religion (mysticism rather than religion per se), and art (in the sense I've explained). So you see, Thelema is always bigger and greater than one would expect.

I'm still working on my paper, commentaries on the verse: "For pure will, unassuaged of purpose, delivered from the lust of result, is every way perfect.", and once it's finished I'll try and translate, but as you can see, I always have problems translating philosophical terms from spanish to english.
93/93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
15/10/2006 9:49 pm  

Hello there,

m.klaw, I wouldn't class Falun da Fa/Falun Gong as a credible modern Daoist school, they're a cultish group with a rich charismatic leader.

I would heartily disagree regarding the common wellspring of practical, as opposed to academic, Daoism and Thelema (I think academically speaking, contextual difficulties would invalidate any useful thesis), but I'll save that for Taolema...
😉

(edited to include comment in brackets)


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 Anonymous
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15/10/2006 10:39 pm  

With regard to the earlier post from m.klaw , about academic issues , my take on this is that occultists dont need to justify themselves to any academic. If memory serves me i have said this in a previous post , with regard to another thread. It is not the job of an occultist to justify or explain themself to an academic who wants answers . If an academic wants answers , then they should "practice" and find out for themself. Simple. I can understand from a historical point of view where the evolution of Magick / Thelema etc is concerned , but if we are debating the occult / mystical side and the current then academics has no place.


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 Anonymous
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16/10/2006 12:04 am  
"hawthornrussell" wrote:
With regard to the earlier post from m.klaw , about academic issues , my take on this is that occultists dont need to justify themselves to any academic. If memory serves me i have said this in a previous post , with regard to another thread. It is not the job of an occultist to justify or explain themself to an academic who wants answers

What about Gemistus Pletho, Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, Luca Pacioli, Giordano Bruno, Francis Bacon...?
Why should that tradition of people who wanted to explain occult subjects using the tools of philosophy or the academy should be discarded?
(Indeed, I sometimes think that if it wasn't for them, some people would still be "burning witches" nowadays!)


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
16/10/2006 5:28 am  

93
hawthornrussell,

With regard to the earlier post from m.klaw , about academic issues , my take on this is that occultists dont need to justify themselves to any academic.

It's not a matter of Thelema excusing it's existence to the academic world as if the academic world had any actual power on deciding what should and should not exist.

The issue is not "Thelema must be justified", but rather "Thelema should expand", by "expanding" I mean taking it from the underground (specially in latin america), putting it out there, not only in music and magic, but in other "realms" such as academic philosophy.

Here's an example of how important or beneficial it would be to take Thelema to academic philosophy: In the XIX century philosophers started thinking about "work", that's right "work" as a concept as in "what does it mean to "work"?" or "what is the meaning of "having to work"?, working was something alien to philosophy, but ever since then the topic of "work" as a philosophical issue stands in many areas. I envision the same with Thelema, I dream of a world where Thelema is discussed in Universities at the same level that they discuss Sartre or Foucalt.

Maybe I'm biased, but to me is of capital importance, and is not, in any sense, way or form, an excusing or justifying the occult in the eyes of academia.
93/93


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 Anonymous
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13/11/2006 5:31 pm  

asclepio, I too was a philosophy major in college. I think that you'll find Heidegger's thought to be quite congruous with certain strains of AC. I would pay close attention to Dasein's different modes of Being as being analogous to the journey of the magician. Also, it would seem to me that the entire book Being and Time is a meditation on the nature of Hadit; this could definantly be explored in a thesis. Aside from Heidegger, you should definantly look into Whitehead's Process and Reality, which, like Heidegger, tears down traditional ontological schemas and seeks a total reform of Western thought. You might also compare the phenomenological method with AC's "method of science, aim of religion." The same hold's true of Whitehead's method of "speculative philosophy" as he defines it. Finally, if you are interested in the philosophy of mathematics at all (which undoubtedly has a great bearing on thelemic matters) check out Rudy Rucker's works. Especially interesting is his book Infinity and the Mind, which helps greatly in an understanding of Nuit. Also, anything that deals with the possible a priori nature of numbers can be a great interest in conjunction with thelema. Good luck!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
17/11/2006 9:20 pm  

93
Frankish_Philosopher,
Thanks for your response, I really appreciate your point of view and I concurr, Heidegger seems to be essential for my future thesis.

I too was a philosophy major in college. I think that you'll find Heidegger's thought to be quite congruous with certain strains of AC. I would pay close attention to Dasein's different modes of Being as being analogous to the journey of the magician. Also, it would seem to me that the entire book Being and Time is a meditation on the nature of Hadit; this could definantly be explored in a thesis.

I agree, and more over I find very interesting the idea that Being is in language, but I find it intriguing in the sense that if Being is language then Thelema brakes the barriers of language (of Being) it is beyond being (like Levinas would say).

Aside from Heidegger, you should definantly look into Whitehead's Process and Reality, which, like Heidegger, tears down traditional ontological schemas and seeks a total reform of Western thought. You might also compare the phenomenological method with AC's "method of science, aim of religion." The same hold's true of Whitehead's method of "speculative philosophy" as he defines it.

I'll be checking it out soon, if you know of other authors that might be of help, please let me know.

Finally, if you are interested in the philosophy of mathematics at all (which undoubtedly has a great bearing on thelemic matters) check out Rudy Rucker's works. Especially interesting is his book Infinity and the Mind, which helps greatly in an understanding of Nuit. Also, anything that deals with the possible a priori nature of numbers can be a great interest in conjunction with thelema.

I should be interested in mathematics, except of course the basic fact that math and me aren't exactly best friends, but I'm guessing you're right, there's a lot of mathematics in thelema.

Also, have you read "thus spoke zaratustra"? is it me or is Zaratustra a small prophet waiting for the Great Beast, like Jhon the Baptist was to Jesus?

Also there's the idea of Aeons, which seem to fit perfectly with the evolution of philosophy towards Nietzsche's conception of Will, Heidegger's idea of hermeneutics as being of ontological nature, and the whole issue with language (now I understand why ABRAHADABRA is the last word, beyond that word, or after that word, there is none other, it is the frontier between Being, which exists in language, and Will or the HGA).

Any further recomendations or thoughts will be deeply appreciated.
93/93


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