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Is BOTL’s RHK identical with Liber 418’s CONQUERING CHILD?


lashtal
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@wellreadwellbred continues to experience technical problems that make it difficult for him/her to post here. This thread was created at his/her request and the following text has not been edited...

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According to chapter 66 in Aleister Crowley’s Autohagiography, The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, his book titled Liber 418 or The Vision and the Voice, is ”only second in importance”, to his book titled The Book of the Law.

According to http://iao131.com/2014/04/28/the-symbolic-dimensions-of-the-gnostic-mass-2/ , an essay written by one IAO131, titled Symbolic Dimensions of the Gnostic Mass, Ra-Hoor-Khuit (”the God within who transcends space, time, and causality, who transcends all the gods and even death itself. The complete identification with Ra-Hoor-Khuit essentially constitutes

According to the Wikipedia article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heru-ra-ha, ”Within Thelema, Ra-Hoor-Khuit is called the Lord of the Aeon (which began in 1904 according to Thelemic doctrine), and The Crowned and Conquering Child.”, and ”The Cry of the First Aethyr in Crowley’s Liber 418 presents Horus, the Crowned and Conquering Child, as the union of many opposites.”:

”It is a little child covered with lilies and roses. […] ”This child danceth not, but it is because he is the soul of the two dances, — the right hand and the left hand, and in him they are one dance, the dance without motion. […] I am light, and I am night, and I am that which is beyond them. […] I am life, and I am death, and I am that which is beyond them. […] Yet by none of these can man reach up to me. Yet by each of them must man reach up to me. […] Holy, Holy, Holy, Holy; yea, thrice and four times holy art thou, because thou hast attained to look upon my face; … […] FOR I AM HORUS, THE CROWNED AND CONQUERING CHILD, WHOM THOU KNEWEST NOT!”

Is the main character of the third and last chapter of The Book of the Law, Ra-Hoor-Khuit, who is the union of Nuit and Hadit (the main characters of respectively the first and the second chapter of The Book of the Law), identical with HORUS, THE CROWNED AND CONQUERING CHILD, the main character of the First Aethyr (or ”first” ”chapter”) of Crowley’s book titled Liber 418 or The Vision and the Voice?

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gurugeorge
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Yes, I think so. Not many other crowned and conquering children around that it could be really, are there? 🙂


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threefold31
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"Is the main character of the third and last chapter of The Book of the Law, Ra-Hoor-Khuit, who is the union of Nuit and Hadit (the main characters of respectively the first and the second chapter of The Book of the Law), identical with HORUS, THE CROWNED AND CONQUERING CHILD, the main character of the First Aethyr (or ”first” ”chapter”) of Crowley’s book titled Liber 418 or The Vision and the Voice?"

Dwtw

It seems a common conception that RHK is the result of the union of Hadit and Nuit; Crowley himself says as much. But nowhere in Liber CCXX does it say this, or anything even analogous to it. Rather, it seems that the cosmogony of AL leans more toward Hadit being Harpocrates, the passive half of the dual-divinity whose active half is Ra Hoor Khuit.

Nowhere in Liber CCXX does RHK say he is a child - crowned, conquering, or otherwise. However, RHK does say his throne will be taken over by Hrumachis eventually, and one might infer that he is therefore crowned, since he is enthroned. Yet, while the iconography of RHK is a falcon headed man, that of Harpocrates is a child on a lotus flower, so it's hard to make a direct link and say that RHK is a child when his iconography says otherwise.

Then you have this excerpt, which seems to state that it is Harpocrates who is the Lord of he Aeon...

The finale of the 2nd Aethyr:
"Come away! For the Second Triad is completed, and there remaineth only the Lord of the Æon, the Avenger, the Child both Crowned and Conquering, the Lord of the Sword and the Sun, the Babe in the Lotus, pure from his birth, the Child of suffering, the Father of justice, unto whom be the glory throughout all the Æon!"

Perhaps it is merely hair-splitting, since RHK is of course a form of Horus. But one shouldn't forget that Ra and Horus were originally two different gods, eventually combined as Ra Hoor.

Litlluw
RLG


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wellreadwellbred
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threefold31: It seems a common conception that RHK is the result of the union of Hadit and Nuit; Crowley himself says as much. But nowhere in Liber CCXX does it say this, or anything even analogous to it.

Abrahadabra is in the first verse of the third and last chapter of the Book of the Law, described as "the reward of Ra Hoor Khut."

"Abrahadabra is a word that appears in The Book of the Law, and is described by Aleister Crowley as the "Word of the Aeon" and that it “represents the Great Work complete, and it is therefore an archetype of all lesser magical operations” (Crowley, 1997)." [...] "Abrahadabra is also referred to as the Word of Double Power. More specifically, it represents the uniting of the Microcosm with the Macrocosm ..." (Source: http://www.thelemapedia.org/index.php/ABRAHADABRA)

From chapter two of the Book of the Law: "2. [...] I, Hadit, am the complement of Nu, my bride. ..." "6. I am the flame that burns in every heart of man, and in the core of every star. ..." "7.I am the Magician and the Exorcist. [...] "Come unto me" is a foolish word: for it is I that go."

In the sense that "Abrahadabra; the reward of Ra Hoor Khut (the Book of the Law III:1)." represents the uniting of the Macrocosm or Nuit with the Microcosm or Hadit, this 'reward of Ra Hoor Khut' can be understood as the result of the union of Nuit and Hadit.

Attainment to Ra Hoor Khut or Ra-Hoor-Khuit is desribed as the result of going "through tribulation of ordeal"; "62. To Me do ye reverence! to me come ye through tribulation of ordeal, which is bliss (the Book of the Law III:62)."


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wellreadwellbred
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According to Aleister Crowley "... Abrahadabra describes the Operation of the Great Work (source: Chapter 7, section IV., in Magick in Theory and Practice - Book 4)."

Also according to Aleister Crowley, 418 "... is the number of the word of the Aeon, ABRAHADABRA, the cypher of the Great Work (source: Book of Thoth, VII. The Chariot)."

According to an Wikipedia article titled Abrahadabra (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abrahadabra), that I read today, Aleister Crowley already around the year 1901, took great interest in the word Abrahadabra, and its qabalistic number 418.

418, the number for "the cypher of the Great Work", Abrahadabra, is in the 46th verse in the first chapter of the Book of the Law, by Nuit (or in a sense the Marcrocosm), defined as or described as "... a secret key of this law."; "Nothing is a secret key of this law. Sixty-one the Jews call it; I call it eight, eighty, four hundred & eighteen (the Book of the Law I:46)."

The same number, is in the 78th verse in the second chapter of the Book of the Law, by Hadit (or in a sense the Microcosm), described as the house of "my prophet"; "78. Lift up thyself! for there is none like unto thee among men or among Gods! Lift up thyself, o my prophet, thy stature shall surpass the stars. They shall worship thy name, foursquare, mystic, wonderful, the number of the man; and the name of thy house 418."

So Abrahadabra, the cypher of the Great Work, that within the Book of the Law is also referred to with the number 418, and there is described as “the reward of Ra Hoor Khut.” (the Book of the Law III:1), to which one attains as the result of going “through tribulation of ordeal” (the Book of the Law III:62), is in the same book described both as "a secret key of" the law presented within it (the Book of the Law I:46), and as the name of the house of "my prophet" (the Book of the Law II:78).

Crowley did also use the number 418, the number of the word Abrahadabra, to refer to his book The Vision and the Voice, a book which he in chapter 66 in his Autohagiography, The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, described as ”only second in importance”, to his book titled The Book of the Law. He did this by referring to The Vision and the Voice with the title Book 418.

The above described data are in support of Ra-Hoor-Khuit, the main character of the third and last chapter of The Book of the Law, to which one attains as the result of going “through tribulation of ordeal” (the Book of the Law III:62), being identical with "Horus, the crowned and conquering child", the main character of the First Aethyr (or ”first” ”chapter”) of Crowley’s book The Vision and the Voice, that he referred to as Book 418.

Because the said Horus child in the said Aethyr declares the following as requirmenets for attainment unto it:

"I am light, and I am night, and I am that which is beyond them.

I am speech, and I am silence, and I am that which is beyond them.

I am life, and I am death, and I am that which is beyond them.

I am war, and I am peace, and I am that which is beyond them.

I am weakness, and I am strength, and I am that which is beyond them.

Yet by none of these can man reach up to me. Yet by each of them must man reach up to me."


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wellreadwellbred
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The above just quoted from Aethyr, is the refered to in the following note written by Crowley for The Cry of the 3rd Aethyr:

"1.The last three Aethyrs are so tremendously sublime that comment is only too likely to mar the effect upon the reader. They must be read as masterpieces of Art, and their full magical import apprehended as such. This remark, indeed applies to the whole series, though not so formidably. The proper way is first to study the book in detail, so as to assimilate perfectly its intellectual content, and then to read it (so to say) ceremonially." (Source: http://hermetic.com/crowley/the-vision-and-the-voice/aethyr3.html)


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