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93 all!

As of late, I have grown incredibly interested, for various reasons, by the passage in The Book of the Law, section 3, verse 73, which reads:

Paste the sheets from right to left and from top to bottom: then behold!

I'm curious to hear peoples' interpretation of this passage. Thanks to all of you in advance who take the time to indulge me in this matter.

93 93/93

Stephanie


   
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Hi Stephanie,

Use the search function Lashtal provides. There was some coverage of "the pasting of the sheets" in the "Babalon as the key" thread. But, I'm pretty sure it pops up in some other threads as well.

Of course, maybe everyone will rehash it in this thread....never say never!

and if you don't mind me asking: what is your interpretation, or experimentation of such?


   
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"AnkhGoddess" wrote:
Paste the sheets from right to left and from top to bottom: then behold!

Personally I think this means simply "make a book out of the manuscript pages" (i.e. the top of the sheet being the face that is written upon).


   
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You've got 65 sheets of the manuscript. To make a grid, that's either 13 across and 5 down, or 5 across and 13 down. Either way, at the exact center is the exclamation point at the end of the word "rejoice!" in chapter 2, verse 44. I can't think of a better thought to be at the very center of the Law than JOY...

If you arrange them 5 across and 13 down, the three sheets that start each chapter make a nice diagonal line. Shades of III:47 ? 😯

Other interpretations that I've seen:

(1) Soror Meral, sometime back in the 1970s or 1980s (in In The Continuum) suggested that the "sheets" may be considered to be the 22 Tarot trumps (pages of the Book of Thoth), and thus that the Class A Liber Tau vel Kabbalae Trium Literarum may thus be related to this arrangment.

(2) Frater Hoor (in "An Essay Upon Number" in the online Magickal Review) suggested that the phrase "from top to bottom" in III:73 means to stack the sheets on top of one another and thus form, well, a book!

Hope this is helpful.

Pestilentially yours,
Steve


   
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"jw" wrote:
Personally I think this means simply "make a book out of the manuscript pages" (i.e. the top of the sheet being the face that is written upon).

Ack! We posted nearly simultaneously. You're not "Frater Hoor," are you, jw?

I hope the discussion group in Maine went well on Wednesday. Sorry I couldn't make it.

Steve


   
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Nope, I'm not Frater Hoor, and yep the group kicked off quite nicely, thanks!

I like the "rejoice!" point, but can you discuss the Soror Meral suggestion a bit more? How do the pages correspond to the trumps in that order (2-3 sheets per atu?).


   
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93

I think I might redecorate my apartment. Why not? how classy can it possibly get? Behold my new tapestry, the wall of pure joy, decoration for a brand new Aeon!

On the less serious side, Ive been hung up over that verse myself, and managed to launch myself into a series of cryptomanic exercises puzzling toghether tarot cards, in the fashion of the hebrew albhabet( from right to left etc). It was fun, but after eight hours, I snapped out of it, got dressed and went out to buy cigarettes. I got many messages, most of them babble which was probably lying around in my subconcious anyway, saving themselves for a rainy day.

93 93/93


   
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"jw" wrote:
I like the "rejoice!" point, but can you discuss the Soror Meral suggestion a bit more? How do the pages correspond to the trumps in that order (2-3 sheets per atu?).

I think the suggestion was that III:73 referred only to the trumps, not to the 65 sheets of the manuscript at all. Jim Eshelman discussed it here (scroll down)...
http://www.heruraha.net/viewtopic.php?p=392 9"> http://www.heruraha.net/viewtopic.php?p=3929

(I don't have Soror Meral's article.)

Steve


   
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A particular Kewl in the OTO I know refers to this as "The Hologram." Perhaps she's refering to the fact that what she uses are the holographic images provided in Liber AL. Other than that, I don't generally know what else to add.


   
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Here's a silly thought. Has anyone ever made transparencies from the manuscript pages? Perhaps pasting the sheets on top of each other creates an interesting Rorschach when light is passed from one end to the other? I'm sure someone could take a few minutes from their EQ-discovery-of-the-day to investigate. Do mind the grids and coffee stains, hm. πŸ˜‰

always with the original in the writing of the Beast; for in the chance shape of the letters and their position to one another: in these are mysteries that no Beast shall divine.


   
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Perhaps it refers to this mystery: http://www.lashtal.com/nuke/PNphpBB2-viewtopic-t-2301.phtml πŸ™‚


   
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Steve...

93!

Wow! Nice...that is pretty cool about the exclamation mark after the word "rejoice," being the center of it all...and yes, I'd totally agree with you...what better meaning to lie at the center of the Law than that? With as much joy as I myself have found upon this path, I can think of no better word to lie at the heart of The Book of the Law, myself.

"SteveCranmer" wrote:
If you arrange them 5 across and 13 down, the three sheets that start each chapter make a nice diagonal line. Shades of III:47 ? 😯

If you don't mind, could you expand a bit more on what you mean by this? I took out my copy of The Book of the Law, and looked through the manuscript portion, but could 't see any sort of a diagonal forming. Perhaps I'll need to find a time to get myself over to a xerox machine so I can copy the manuscript and then try laying the pages out to see what you mean, but in the meanwhile, further explanation would be wonderful, if you wouldn't mind explaining.

The posting on the Temple of Thelema board was rather interesting...I hadn't heard of this Tarot layout before, which, considering that it was Jim's own devising, is hardly surprising. The Kabbalistic pattern of the K&C of the HGA, through to crossing the Abyss will make for a rather useful meditation in its' own right, and I'll be intrigued to see what gleamings I can find from my meditation on this layout. I've been wanting to start connecting the cards to the Kabbalah for a bit now, but being rather new to the Law, and with my focus having been more on Gemetria since I started on this path just a little over a month ago, I hadn't researched yet for any useful info on the two. So, thanks for the link! I'll be rather curious to see what I find.

All of this was incredibly different from the work I did with the local OTO group rescently, the results of which I'll post next per ap0kalypt1ka's request. However, I did want to take the time to comment on what you'd shared, as the information you gave was rather intriguing. You wouldn't happen to know where I could get my hands on a copy of Soror Meral's article, by any chance? I know you don't have a copy yourself, but I was wondering if perhaps you know of resources where one can get back copies of In the Continuum? I could always try and track the article down by ordering an archived copy of the publication, should that be a possibility.

At any rate, thanks again for the info!

93 93/93

Stephanie


   
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Ap0kalypt1ka (I do hope I spelled that right) had asked for my interpetation of III:73. I'd wanted to take the time to hear other people's interpretations of this particular passage first, as well as begin a discussion on this particular section of the Book of the Law.

Resently, I was at a study group held by the local OTO branch here in town, and the topic was this very passage. The member leading the group (I'm not a part of the OTO myself) said that he was meditating on this passage one day, trying to decipher the meaning, when it occurred to him that perhaps, if one begins by reading the first sentence of the third section, then the first sentence of the second section, and then, finally, the first sentence from the first section, and then repeat the process for every sentence within The Book of the Law, perhaps new insights could perhaps be gained from the reading of the book in this way. In this way, "pasting," could be looked at as "intertwining," the sections together, so that new insights could perhaps be gained.

So we read the book aloud in this way, only we did so with only the first two sections of the book (it will be done with all three in a study group held next month) As I sat and listened, I began to find that not only did some of the passages that had before remained a mystery to me took on a depth of meaning that I hadn't, until then, grasped. Being read aloud, with Hadit's section read by a male member of the group, and Nuit's, of course, by a female, the two books took on the form of an incredibly intimate discussion being held between Hadit and Nuit, with many of the passages flowing rather seamlessly between one another in this fashion. In this way, a rather incredible conversation between the two seemed to be held.

There were a fair number that held some rather incredible meaning for me, I must say. I won't go through and quote the passages in this fashion word for word here in this post, as that would just make this posting far too long. Some of the corresponding passages that held particular meaning for me however were II:53 and I:53 (in fact, if one goes through and reads the passages 54-56 in this way as well, it forms a rather interesting conversation between Hadit and Nuit on the English alphabet, and how it's meaning will ultimately come to be interpreted.)

Others include 17-18, and 21-22, respectively. There were a fair number of other passages that called to me, personally, and have made for quite an interesting meditation on The Book of the Law, but these were the ones I found that I felt were the most obvious of the corresponding passages. Not all of them work out in such synchronistic ways, but there's definately enough there that it warrants a careful reading in this way, in my mind.

I'd be curious to hear people's thoughts on this particular interpretation of III:73, and see if reading The Book of the Law in this way held any meaning for them, as well- or, if it doesn't, then what your feelings are on this interpretation.

Haha...then again, perhaps we're all looking far too deeply into this, and III:73 really was telling us to go wallpaper our walls, per JimmyD's suggestion! πŸ˜‰

Have a wonderful Equinox!

93 93/93

Stephanie


   
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"AnkhGoddess" wrote:
"SteveCranmer" wrote:
If you arrange them 5 across and 13 down, the three sheets that start each chapter make a nice diagonal line. Shades of III:47 ? 😯

If you don't mind, could you expand a bit more on what you mean by this? I took out my copy of The Book of the Law, and looked through the manuscript portion, but could 't see any sort of a diagonal forming.

Sorry I was too brief. I think that looking through the bound-book won't do it... you've got to arrange those sheets! πŸ™‚

If you make the 5-across, 13-down grid (going from right to left, then down the rows), the first page of the first chapter is in the upper-right corner. The first page of the 2nd chapter is in the 5th row, in the middle. The first page of the 3rd chapter is in the 9th row, on the left. They form a diagonal line.

My jokey comment about III:47 refers to the other infamous diagonal line on the page of the manuscript that corresponds to that verse.

Perhaps I'll need to find a time to get myself over to a xerox machine so I can copy the manuscript and then try laying the pages out to see what you mean, ...

Nah, for a first "look," just take 65 post-its, or index cards, or something and jot down on them which verses appear on the corresponding pages.

When I did this, I also wrote down the first and last words that appear on each page of the manuscript, to see if they form any interesting patterns. (Nothing significant, in my opinion...)

You wouldn't happen to know where I could get my hands on a copy of Soror Meral's article, by any chance?

Back issues of In the Continuum are available by snail-mail; see:
http://www.thelema.org/publications/itc.htm l"> http://www.thelema.org/publications/itc.html

I don't think there's an online table of contents, though, so I'm not sure which volume or issue that was in.

Steve


   
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Well, it might be a good idea to look at the whole book and the greater circumstances, and see III 73 as the epilogue of Liber Al. Let's not forget, an Egyptian is speaking, not Crowley. He just writes the book down, so let's try to look at it from the point of view of an Egyptian.

I think the explanation SteveCranmer initially gives in (2) is correct, but I have different reasons. The last third of AL III seems to contain a lot of general instructions on how the book has to be used and what it is (III 39, III 47, III 63, etc.). Finally, it closes with III 70. ff, and gives the final instructions in III, 73, namely, "make a book out of it and read from top to bottom." This instruction makes little sense for an English book, since there is only one possible direction you can read. For an Egyptian book it would make lots of sense; there are three possible ways. Yes, one can easily determine where to start reading hieroglyphs, but in situations like that scribes wrote Hieratic, at Anch.f n Chnsw's time even they even wrote Demotic. I don't know if someone here has ever seen a Demotic text? Use Google to find one somewhere on the Internet, and look at it. Remember, the little dashes and slashes you see are supposed to be hieroglyphs! This is the handwriting of the Late Period, that's how people wrote, they didn't write in beautiful hieroglyphs. You'll understand where I am coming from.

The instructions on how to arrange the sheets are pretty much pointless for us, our books come bound, fortunately. Egyptian books came either as a papyrus roll (for long books), or as papyrus sheets, which had a recto and a verso side. Here the arrangement of the sheets is elementary, unless you want to wind up with a big, nasty mess. Handling a papyrus roll was relatively easy, the main side was always the side where the papyrus fibers went horizontal. Papyrus sheets were treated differently, you could write on both sides, but the first side was most likely the side with vertical fibers (recto), the second page was on the second sheet recto, etc.

The greater plot: The book was initiated by Aiwass, and was written down in 3 consecutive days, one hour each day. It contains several personalities, like Nuit (=Nwt), the goddess of heaven, typically depicted as a naked woman with stars on her torso, bowing over the earth. She dominates the first chapter.

The second chapter is dominated by Hadit as the spouse of Nwt, which is strange. According to the heliopolitan cosmogony, Gb was Nwt's spouse.

Last we have "Ra Hoor Khuit", who, in reality, is R:-Hrw-:ch.ty, The God Ra in his appearance as Horus of the Horizons. What Crowley's stela-translator initially interpreted as "Khuit" is nothing but the dual ending of the noun "horizon" = :ch.ty = "the two horizons. The Egyptian language had a singular, a plural, and a dual. Even though the dual was most likely known in 1904, they might not have been aware of that back then, and probably read the dual ending as something like uit or uti.

The hawk headed God in III 70 is either Ankh-fn Chnsw's Mntw (Month) or R:-Hrw-:ch.ty, they both can appear as anthropomorphic deities with a hawk's head. It's most likely R:-Hrw-:ch.ty, even though he is normally not called "lord of silence. The lady of silence is a goddess (mr.t sgr), and the lord of strength is typically Swtch (Seth), the brother of Osiris.

So my interpretaition is, the god R:-Hrw-:ch.ty gives final instructions on how to handle the book, and on how to arrange the sheets. I do not see a deeper magical plot, secret sign, or puzzle in III 73, it makes sense just as it is written.


   
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(@azidonis)
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93,

If one good thing ever came from the modern (c)O.T.O., it is those little red copies of Liber AL, which can be obtained for only $7.95. They released a hardcover version at some point, and that's not what I'm referring to. There is also a new softsover version (I suppose they realized the mistake), and I haven't tried it yet, but should work the same.

Essentially, spend the $15.90 + tax (or whatever it is now), and buy two copies of the little red softcover version. Be very careful, and rip the book in half at the spine. The binding undone, it will be much easier to delicately take each page from both books without any harm. After this, organize them.

There are so many things to use as a background, such as canvas. In my youth I obtained four pieces of red poster board, turned them sideways, and duct taped them to each other end on end, turning the project over so the duct tape is in the back of it (against the wall per se). Then I made a measurement of 5 sheets across and 13 down, putting a small space in between. A quick way is to lay them all down "right to left and top to bottom" on the construction paper or other means, with the first page of Chapter I, "Had! The manifestation of Nuit" (etc.), in the top right corner. Go across five pages, then onto the second row. Repeat this all the way down for the thirteen rows. The book will then be read "from right to left and from top to bottom". Get an accurate idea of where you want the top five pages, and on one side, thirteen down. Make little tiny pen or pencil marks in the corners (right angles), so you'll know where to put those first 17 pages. After that, grab some glue or other means and go to work. I used Scotch tape, as it doesn't make a mess or make the pages look soaked, and simply rolled the tape into those little loops, put one small piece at each of the four corners, and wa-la! After the first 17 pages are laid, you essentially have a graph to use for placing the other pages, and it'll come out in very wonderful uniformity.

Steve Cranmer's idea is great too. It can save a ton of confusion by placing Post-It notes with the page number (or verse numbers) in each spot before you begin to paste the sheets. Then you only have to pull the Post-Its up before placing the sheet.

Afterwards, there may or may not be some extra construction paper on the edges (memory faultly), but if you've measured right is 'should' go okay. At the end of the effort, what you have is a large 'mural' of Liber L, standing between 6' and 7' high, and around 2' wide. It fits nicely on a standard wall, and as it is also said, "set up mine image in the East".

There is also a scan to be found in various places of he sheets already pasted, which some simply frame and use. Either way, its a wonderful addition to any Temple.

Thus is an explanation of how to "paste the sheets" (using one widely accepted method) for under $30.

Best of luck in the Great Work!

93 93/93


   
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93

Im inclined to agree that there might not be any magickal secret linked to this phrase, but then again all things are related, so in a sense, there must be.

I know that I chased that verse around until I perished with the infamous dogs of reason, much like a swarm of moths in an attention starved blender on amphetamines.

But that was me, and the same might not apply to others. there is wisdom in everything, and folly in all wisdom and vica versa.

Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!!!

Now if this blender be the wheel of fortune, the universe these moths, we get a very nice idea of how reason destroys our perception. what we need to do, is unplugg the blender, uncap it, and set the moths free. But alas, we will then have our entire kitchen filled with these moths. We need to uncap our kitchen. Then our house will be inhabited by a moth swarm, but now they are spread out so far apart, that it is difficult for us to simply uncap our house in order to free our, by now, beloved swarm.

There is a simple solution to this:Moths are naturally drawn towards light. Wait for the midnight hour of the sun,turn out all the lights, get a flashlight, and use it to gather all the moths into a flock. You are now a moth sheperd, and with a little skillfull handling of your chosen flashlight, you can now actually herd the entire flock to any destination of your choice. This must be done intuitively, since there is a cloud of moths blocking up your flashlight.

All this without anyone ever asking the very moths in question ,what they might prefer. Only their all consuming addiction to light, and their savage taste for outdated overcoats give us a clue. Yet, there is wisdom in their folly: we will lead them outside, through the open doorway or window, and then by a simple click:

1. The entire swarm is free.
2. Our house is clear.
3. We can yet again employ our blender for domestic purposes.
4. We have learned to herd moths, which is a(n increasingly) rare skill indeed.
5. We find ourselves outside,the weather is fine, and all lights in our house is already turned out, so we are free to go somewhere.
6. Though the moths know no gratitude, their relief rings in harmony with our own satisfaction, thus it is Love.
7.We can now boast of our little adventure to all our friends.
8. It will make the most fascinating diary entry ever, guaranteed to amuse for years to come.
9. By saving the moths, we have added strenght to the natural resources of the entire ecosystem, ourselves included.
10. The mailbox is only a few yards away, and by our flashlight, we can read the mail straight away, and still go somewhere afterwards by the simple expenditure of putting the mail back inside the box after we have read through it. This can also be done with the flaslight, for added feeling of flexibility and comfort.

Woe unto him who herds those little pests back into the blender! He will have gained nothing but a greyish, qlippotic soup of mashed insectoids!

93 93/93


   
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(@proteus)
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Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

I'd be curious to hear people's thoughts on this particular interpretation of III:73, and see if reading The Book of the Law in this way held any meaning for them, as well- or, if it doesn't, then what your feelings are on this interpretation.

Take a look at Crowley's synopsis of Liber ARARITA for more on this method.

John

Love is the law, love under will.


   
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Hi Stephanie πŸ™‚

Indeed, you did spell 'my' name correctly...though, I certainly wouldn't be offended if you didn't.

Okay, I want to thank you for elaborating! From what you described, I would have never connected that with the 'pasting of the sheets' passage.

The techinque of reading passages in alternate sequences is quite fascinating. Because of passages being directly connected to other passages, I once explored a similar method.
This will be a re-hash, but we are on the subject of III:73 (3+7+3 =13):
One can paste the sheets by roughly dividing the number of sheets in half and paste one half right to left and the remaining half top to bottom to form a crude Greek Gamma, or an upside down "L", if you will.
Gamma equals 3 or 13. Using 13 as a key, unlocks a great deal of Liber aL, in my opinion. Using Greek as reference to the MS makes sense since it alludes to such in the first chapter; namely I:93 (1+9+3 =13.)

Keep in mind, the pasting the sheets instruction is from 3:73. 373 pops up if we add the total number of passages from each chapter:
Chapter 1, 66 passages --> 6+6 =12, 1+2 = 3
Chapter 2, 79 passages --> 7+9 =16, 1+6 = 7
Chapter 3, 75 passages --> 7+5 =12, 1+2 = 3
3+7+3 = 13

Chapter I:48 (1+4+8 = 13), also ties into the pasting of the sheets.
Anyhow, that is just a demonstration of how we find a common numerical theme or scheme...or coincidence πŸ™‚

In a way, Liber aL implies a 4th Book of the Law or a 4th chapter. It wouldn't be unreasonable that one could be created from the existing text. Maybe the three chapters presented are purposely scrambled and the true message or secrets are only revealed once the book has been assembeled correctly.
I hope you are able to follow this, I just got off work and want to go to bed...though, my posts are usually sloppy anyhow.

So, you could go through the book and link passages via a numerical scheme. Basically, what you have already done at that OTO session. You could easily go to the third chapter and decide to read every passage that equals 4 (in this case, including Chapter number [3] into things:
3:1 Abrahadabra; the reward of Ra Hoor Khut.
3:10 Get the Stele of Revealing itself; set it in thy secret temple -and that temple is already aright disposed- & it shall be your Kiblah for ever. It shall not fade, but miraculous colour shall come back to it day after day. Close it in locked glass for a proof to the world.
3:19 That stele they shall call the Abomination of Desolation; count well its name, & it shall be to you as 718.
3:28 Also ye shall be strong in war.
3:37 I adore thee in the song ---
3:46 I am the warrior Lord of the Forties...
3:55 Let Mary be inviolate...
..................basically, the method seems to start strong and then fizzles.
I once tried to apply a scheme to the book so that all 3 chapters were combined, but the results were sketchy.
The beauty of Liber aL is that it is abstract; that is what makes it possible to re-read and gain different insight. It is also why you can mix and match chapters and feel like they are suppose to be connected.

I think the technique you described has merit. At the very least, it makes for some fascinating connections. I feel you, or that OTO gathering, were on to something; something worthwhile to explore.
The first passage from each chapter (which gives the 111 from 1:48....and, don't overlook that 1:48 is awful close to '418', mentioned in the book) can be used to fashion a matrix to calculate the values of the letters. It can also be used to figure out how to reverse, or mirror, numbers too: HAD reversed equals NUIT, NU reversed equals HADIT, and so on.

I'm out of steam............again, thank you for sharing. I'm quite delighted because I don't often encounter others who have tried similar things.

And

Well, it might be a good idea to look at the whole book and the greater circumstances, and see III 73 as the epilogue of Liber Al. Let's not forget, an Egyptian is speaking, not Crowley. He just writes the book down, so let's try to look at it from the point of view of an Egyptian.

Quite excellent, Fraseth. That makes total sense if we divorce the MS from Crowley and accredit the work to an ancient Egyptian. I understand exactly what you are talking about in terms of writing/reading direction. I just never thought to apply that thought to Liber aL.


   
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"ap0kalypt1ka" wrote:
Quite excellent, Fraseth. That makes total sense if we divorce the MS from Crowley and accredit the work to an ancient Egyptian. I understand exactly what you are talking about in terms of writing/reading direction. I just never thought to apply that thought to Liber aL.

To be honest, it wasn't even my own idea, it was Crowley's:

"Of course I wrote them, ink on paper, in the material sense; but they are not My words"

Rose had previously identified the speaker not as Horus himself, but his messenger, Aiwass.


   
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(@azidonis)
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93,

Hrm, it's just a silly old idea, but in Buddhism we sometimes find Alatrs or shrines dedicated to Buddha, with little Buddhas on them and such. In Christianity, well, you already know... in some other religions, the same thing goes. I imagine if one were really interested in the I Ching (to the point of feeling it is or has a great code which will help us unlock ourselves), then perhaps one could make a big mural by painting the Hexagrams, and aligning them somehow.

So then, why would one want a mural of Liber AL, and why would Liber AL gives the instructions for the mural? "Set up mine image in the East..." "not unlike the one thou knowest..." It is fitting that Liber AL could indeed have been speaking of the similar patterns alreayd in use worldwide, for centuries.

Just a thought.

93 93/93


   
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threefold31
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Paste –verb (used with object)
to fasten or stick with paste or the like.
to cover with something applied by means of paste.


[Origin: 1350–1400; ME < MF < LL pasta dough < Gk pastΓ‘ barley porridge, n. use of neut. pl. of pastΓ³s, sprinkled, salted; verbid of pΓ‘ssein to strew, sprinkle; a pasta was orig. a kind of gruel sprinkled with salt]


   
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The proper way is to start with the (often unpublished) title sheet as Page 0 (the Fool), and make a pyramid downward from that. You will end up with a pyramid 11 pages high and 11 at the base. Abrahadabra.

(for more details try this blog post which has a photo of the layout: http://izabael.typepad.com/izabael/2009/01/liber-al-book-of-the-law-proper-arrangement-of-the-manuscript-sheets-at-last.html )

xoxo,
iza


   
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(@lashtal)
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Welcome to LAShTAL.COM and thank you for your first post...

"izabael" wrote:
The proper way

In what way and with what authority is this "the proper way"?

You use the word ("proper") three times on the page to which you link but without an explanation as to what makes it so.

By the way, you refer to the resulting layout as a "pyramid" and, on your Blog post, you derive significance from this shape. Except it isn't, of course: it's a triangle, which is inevitable as that's the layout you've deliberately crafted.

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"lashtal" wrote:
In what way and with what authority is this "the proper way"?

You use the word ("proper") three times on the page to which you link but without an explanation as to what makes it so.

This layout will either resonate with you as the correct solution or not. I urge serious students to lay the pages out themselves and play with it awhile.

"lashtal" wrote:
By the way, you refer to the resulting layout as a "pyramid" and, on your Blog post, you derive significance from this shape. Except it isn't, of course: it's a triangle, which is inevitable as that's the layout you've deliberately crafted.

Absolutely right. Thank you for the correction.

xoxo,
iza


   
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(@lashtal)
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"izabael" wrote:
This layout will either resonate with you as the correct solution or not.

My questions did not relate to whether or not the layout "resonated" with me, but on what basis you referred to it repeatedly as "the proper way."

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"lashtal" wrote:
"izabael" wrote:
This layout will either resonate with you as the correct solution or not.

My questions did not relate to whether or not the layout "resonated" with me, but on what basis you referred to it repeatedly as "the proper way."

93 izabael,

Does this arrangement of the sheets reveal a meaning to the verses that differs from what one would get from reading them in a more straightforward manner?


   
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Here's one approach. Remove 14 cards from your Tarot deck. Take the remainder of the deck and hand them in turn to as many people as you may. Ask them to lay the cards "from right to left and from top to bottom" accept no questions upon the directions given. Record the results. Now, the right to left part seems easy enough, but how would one arrange them from top to bottom at the same time? The solution lies in placing each individual cards upside down ( i.e: top to bottom. ) Try this task with the actual sheets while pasting them to the subway walls and then slowly step back until the message appears clear. Note: do not perform this task if the train is near arrival or if another is about to pass...


   
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(@ozzzz666)
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93 Izabael,

I noticed this while perusing your site the other day, and I must admit, I too felt that when you (or Pamphage) state that this is the proper way, I found myself wondering how you came to that conclusion from the passage. I personally see nothing that would indicate creating a pyramid from the pages. It is interesting, but I just don't see how it makes a pyramid when you follow the instructions given. The addition of the title page is an interesting touch though. I wasn't aware of such a page. thanks for your contribution, and nice to see you here.

93 93/93,
Fr. Oz


   
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(@lashtal)
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"ozzzz666" wrote:
I wasn't aware of such a page.

Really? It's been on LAShTAL since November 2006: http://www.lashtal.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-103 0"> http://www.lashtal.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-1030

You need to be logged in to LAShTAL to see the image, I believe...

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(@ozzzz666)
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Thanks, Paul.

As helpful and thorough as ever. Now that I get a closer look at it...I have seen this page. And to correct myself on my above post....."Triangle" yes...triangle is much better.

93 93/93 Sir.


   
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I interpret it as arranging the Tarot Keys from right to left and top to bottom, to create a cross. These usually have interesting numbering properties. It works best when one considers the even number divisions of a circle with the one in the center: 6+1 = 7, 12+1 = 13, 36+1 = 37, 72+1 = 73, 120+1 = 121, etc.

I'll give the example of doing it with 12+1 = 13. [A cool example is with the God Name AL squared: (L = 30) x 12 = 360 + (A = 1) = 361.


7


8


9
6-5-4--13--3-2-1


10


11


12

The verse being III:73 as 373 encodes to do it with 36+1 = 37 and 72+1 = 73, which as it may be known are both associated with the hexagram.

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Star-number
http://homepage.virgin.net/vernon.jenkins/FiguratePrimer.htm


   
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Btw, I liked the picture Izabael of the Liber Legis pyramid. The problem is the inclusion of the "cover page" as the apex. One could however insert Crowely's Tunis comment alternately, which I think is the better solution. This due to the actual number of pages in each chapter:

I: 22
II. 22
III. 21

The insertion of the Comment allows the last chapter to contain the 22 chapters you are looking for to make the sum 66 as (1-11), enabling the pyramid design. In the last I would say it is not the optimal solution.

I will note that the normal number of pages, being 65, allows a right to left and top to bottom schema that I demonstrate above with 13, due to 65 being (16x4) + 1; but 65 isn't a star number like 37 & 73.

Why the particular order right to left and top to bottom remains a mystery to me. In my cross schema it would work left to right and bottom to top too, etc. It's probably just to make a clear landing pad for the UFO's... πŸ˜†


   
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If you do it the "regular" way (65 pages; either 13 across and 5 down, or 5 across and 13 down) the word "rejoice!" in verse II:44 is at the "center" of the book. Actually, the exclamation point at the end is very near the exact center! A twitter-era summary of the Law of Liberty?!

If you do it 5 across and 13 down, the three pages that start each chapter form a diagonal line. Probably meaningless, but at least symmetric! πŸ™‚

Steve


   
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Whoops -- I just realized I repeated my thought from earlier in this thread! 😳 Any moderators, please feel free to delete the above post (and this one) to keep lashtal.com sparkly clean and free of clutter...

Steve


   
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Thank you for posting up this new and possible solution, It deserves further exploration for sure , as often the title page has been forgotten (myself included, even though I knew it existed and am not one of the people that SHOULD have checked it out already in the galleries...........-wow....), nor am I paying attention the word proper, I am merely enjoying the idea, and your contribution,thanks.


   
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this is one pretty awesome thread!
just had to say that!

I'm really a beginner at crowleys texts, so i can't realy say anything about it...


   
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I've always assumed that "pasting the sheets" was an allusion to some kind of debaucherous sex rite.

I've got to stop thinking out of the box so much.


   
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lololol. I must admit that this was also my first thought Ronin. :-))) But when you read Crowley you're always watching for him to slip one in;-)


   
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Dwtw

If one takes the 65 holograph sheets and places them in a 5 x 13 rectangle, starting with page 1 of Nuit's chapter at the upper right, you have the following layout:

05--04--03--02--01
10--09--08--07--06
15--14--13--12--11
20--19--18--17--16
03--02--01--22--21
08--07--06--05--04
13--12--11--10--09
18--17--16--15--14
01--22--21--20--19
06--05--04--03--02
11--10--09--08--07
16--15--14--13--12
21--20--19--18--17

If you sum the page-numbers of the 5 columns you have:

147 - 156 - 143 - 152 - 139

The sum of the page numbers is 737
while the instruction appears in 3:73

Note that 143 is the value of the middle column.

If you make a diagonal line starting from the upper right corner and zig-zag down to the lower left corner, the page numbers also sum to 143. The same is true for a zig-zag from the upper left corner to the lower right.

The same is also true for what are called the 'broken diagonals' in magic square terminology, (a term easier to see than describe, so google magic squares to find out more). The answer is always 143.

If one makes a 13 x 5 rectangle, starting with page 1 of Nuit's chapter and making 13 pages in each row, the exact same results appear: the middle row has page-numbers that sum to 143 and any zig-zag diagonals, (and broken diagonals), will also have page numbers that equal 143.

13--12--11--10--09--08--07--06--05--04--03--02--01 = 091
04--03--02--01--22--21--20--19--18--17--16--15--14 = 172
17--16--15--14--13--12--11--10--09--08--07--06--05 = 143
08--07--06--05--04--03--02--01--22--21--20--19--18 = 136
21--20--19--18--17--16--15--14--13--12--11--10--09 = 195

These are the only two rectangles that can be made from the sequential distribution of the pages.
From these layouts it can be concluded that 143 is the 'magic sum' of the page numbers.
143 also happens to be the sum of the numbers in the cipher of verse 2:76.

In the Trigrammaton English Gematria,
143 is the value of the title "The Book of the Law"

Litlluw
RLG


   
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In his Collected Works, there is an appendix compiling a "list of first lines" of sentences of all his poems. If you take those first lines, they make up another poem, which is the purpose of the appendix. So Crowley was definitely aware of these kinds of methods for concealing messages within messages(apparently many poets have done this so it has somewhat of a tradition).

RK


   
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"withigo" wrote:
In his Collected Works, there is an appendix compiling a "list of first lines" of sentences of all his poems. If you take those first lines, they make up another poem, which is the purpose of the appendix.

Nonsense.

The "purpose of the appendix" is to enable the reader to locate the poems.

I suspect you're confusing this appendix with the "glossary of technical terms" in "Winged Beetle".

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threefold31, You have presented, in your last post on this thread, the first ever "solution" to any of the riddles (out of the many posted here at lashtal) that I have found interesting. So, kudos and keep up the Great Work!


   
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Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

the way this was originally done is shown in Equinox I, 7. the first five pages across the top from right to left, and continue down just like that until you have thirteen rows.

Love is the law, love under will.


   
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"izabael" wrote:
The proper way is to start with the (often unpublished) title sheet

Agreed! Just because Crowley separated the Title Page of Liber L from the rest of the manuscript in 1907 (IIRC) is no reason not to include it.


   
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You're really going through the archives, Walter. πŸ™‚


   
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Walterfive - "Agreed! Just because Crowley separated the Title Page of Liber L from the rest of the manuscript in 1907 (IIRC) is no reason not to include it."

If I may propose a reason for omitting the much-neglected 'Title Page' in this genre of computation...

The Title Page is a large sheet of complimentary paper stamped "Cairo Hotel" in Arabic (top left), and folded in two to make a crude, wrap-around cover. Crowley almost certainly abstructed this from the Cairo Hotel during his Egyptian honeymoon with Rose, in April 1904. Conversely, the 65 manuscript leaves are all examples of Alexander Pirie & Sons (not 'Pipie', as incorrectly stated in the big blue brick) standard 1906 watermarked typewriting paper, manufactured especially for sale in London. As such, Crowley could not have obtained these from the Cairo Hotel, or anywhere else in Egypt, during his honeymoon.

Since the two items are products of different continents and different time periods, and Crowley himself separated the specimens... Is it prudent to re-combine them?
❓


   
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(@lashtal)
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"R.T.Cole" wrote:
Conversely, the 65 manuscript leaves are all examples of Alexander Pirie & Sons (not 'Pipie', as incorrectly stated in the big blue brick) standard 1906 watermarked typewriting paper, manufactured especially for sale in London.

And here, tucked away in an obscure little thread, we have possibly the most significant post yet made on this website. If true, the ramifications are enormous…

Thanks for the public post, RTC.

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He could have brought the paper with him in his luggage. I used to do that sometimes too, it was pretty normal back then. Especially for a writer!


   
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(@lashtal)
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"Noctifer" wrote:
He could have brought the paper with him in his luggage. I used to do that sometimes too, it was pretty normal back then. Especially for a writer!

Still rather tricky, Noc, if, as RTC suggests, it wasn't actually produced until two years after the events described!

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