Home Forums Aleister Crowley People Colonel Carter, Top Cop (Considering his Curious Case of Conscientious Concern)

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  • #8475

    jamie barter
    Participant

    Does anyone know if “Colonel Carter” of Scotland Yard (and/ or possibly M.I.5. – I haven’t come across a military title in the constabulary before: wouldn’t it normally be ‘Inspector’, ‘Superintendent’, ‘Commissioner’, or even ‘Commander’?) ever left behind a journal, or did a report, or otherwise described his impressions of his enigmatic encounter(s) with A.C. circa 1929-30?  Or anything much known at all about him/ his career of relevant interest in any way? 

    According to the record they were introduced by Gerald Yorke in order for A.C. to get the “all clear” [A.C.’s wording] & set pesky official minds at rest regarding his being in any way some sort of an undesirable degenerate [my wording].  Maybe the Beast had to run to the expedient of buying a ticket for the famed Policeman’s Ball, but apparently they both got on extremely well if not like the proverbial house on fire, although I don’t think C.C. ever went as far as joining e.g. A.C.’s A.A…

    “Calling all Cars”,
    Norma N. Joy Conquest.

    #82081

    lashtal
    Keymaster
    "jamie barter" wrote:
    Does anyone know if “Colonel Carter” of Scotland Yard (and/ or possibly M.I.5. – I haven’t come across a military title in the constabulary before: wouldn’t it normally be ‘Inspector’, ‘Superintendent’, ‘Commissioner’, or even ‘Commander’?) ever left behind a journal, or did a report, or otherwise described his impressions of his enigmatic encounter(s) with A.C. circa 1929-30?  Or anything much known at all about him/ his career of relevant interest in any way? 

    An intriguing character – referred to by AC in his diaries as ‘Saint Nicholas’, apparently.

    He’s mentioned in most of the biographies as ‘Colonel Nicholas Carter’, but I suspect they mean Colonel John Fillis Carré Carter who died in July 1944. He was Assistant Commissioner of Special Branch at Scotland Yard at the relevant time. Plenty more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Carter_(police_officer)

    It was usual practice at that time for the person filling the role (i.e. Assistant Commissioner) to retain the rank (i.e. Colonel) as an honorific.

    Not sure where the ‘Nicholas’ bit fits in, though – I’m not aware of anyone in such a senior position using the name ‘Colonel Nicholas Carter’ in any policing context.

    #82082

    OKontrair
    Participant

    If AC referred to Carter as ‘Saint Nicholas’ I would be tempted to draw the inference that Carter had possibly made some sort of gift. ‘St.Nicholas’ as in Father Xmas.

    OK

    #82083

    jamie barter
    Participant

    Many thanks for the information, Paul and OK… Sounds more and more intriguing, with another (John) Carter in the force!  (I am also reminded of that most entertaining prog about the Special Branch/ Flying Squad The Sweeney: “Getcha trousers on – you’re nicked!”)

    Somebody has also enquired of me as to the ‘inner’ meaning of the reference

    "jamie barter" wrote:
    Maybe the Beast had to run to the expedient of buying a ticket for the famed Policeman’s Ball

    and on the “assumption” they may not be the only one – amazingly enough it seems some people are not aware of this colloquialism – for the sake particularly of overseas viewers I offer the following explanation.

    The phrase “Policeman’s Ball” is, or used to be, a euphemism for greasing the palms, in other words paying a ‘backhander’ or in effect a bribe, to the officer of the law with whom one was engaged, viz. “Well, sir, perhaps you might be interested in buying some tickets for the Policeman’s Ball?”  (An alternative would be: “Officer, I would like to make a contribution to the Policeman’s Benevolent Fund”.)

    There used to be a satirical alternative-comedy theatrical production which was run by Amnesty International in several incarnations during the 70s and 80s of the same name or certain derivations such as  “The Secret Policeman’s Ball”, etc – and included Monty Python personnel, members of the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band & other musicians and comedians.  I had fond memories of gatecrashing backstage with a schoolfriend to their first production A Poke In The Eye With A Sharp Stick back in 1977, to which we gained entry by bullshitting we were with the press (checks were a lot less stringent in those days!) & everyone had a most merry time getting sozzled on the free after-gig red wine which was flowing (I have a very vague memory of buttonholing John Cleese and Neil Innes – who also happened to be dressed as a policeman – but memories are ‘hazy’ after all this time!)  However I have slightly digressed, but hope now this makes things clear!

    The tickets are all now gone (but it was a fair cop, guvnor)
    N. Joy

    #109935

    Jamie J Barter
    Participant

    I came across the other day this interesting and revealing excerpt from a letter by Col. Carter written to Gerald Yorke about Aleister Crowley, dated 7 October 1929:

    You have got to remember, if a man insists upon calling himself bad for many years, he must not complain if people take him at his own valuation. I do not, but then I am different. I have met him.

    Old Nick appears to have been completely resistant to infection by “the demon Crowley” here… (Of course, A.C. may just have been on his “best behaviour” upon their meeting!)

    N-Joy

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