Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 97 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #59568

    lashtal
    Keymaster
    "seeyouintheentity" wrote:
    I can’t see the point of bothering with Francis King or Martin Booth or the Symonds stuff (save The Beast 666, of course.)

    I happen to agree with you absolutely. ‘The Beast 666’ remains indispensable for evidence of the ‘nastier’ aspects of Crowley.

    Interesting quote attributed to Robert Downey Jr in the acknowledgements and Notes: this suggests a link about which I’d heard rumours but I hadn’t been able to confirm them.

    #59569

    christibrany
    Participant

    inneresting bit on RDowneyJR in Entertainment weekly i hear, about how he did quote White Magick to prepare for ironman. maybe it was already mentioned here but just thought it fit
    about perdurabo i am down to discuss if we have guidelines
    if not , i am just starting the vision and the voice chapter, which is apropos considering i am halfway through the new (weiser ed. of said book) its very good. Its hilarious how neuberg agreed to go along with shaven head minus hair ‘horns’ and pretend to be Crowleys familiar/ demon. Man if only we could interview those cats that were around Abou Said (sic) nowadays if they heard any stories about that weird English wizard…

    Also so telling about Crowley and Roses’ relationship that he was willing to plead adultery to be able to get a divorce, when it would have been just as simple to probably get a divorce from her due to dipsomania, but I guess he felt it was more gentlemanly. And also slightly surprising considering his apparent distaste of bad publicity in later life with the libel cases. unless as i think they were more just for money than his so called reputation.

    The only thing I am not always liking about Perdurabo is it’s incessant hyper details of the lives of those around Crowley such as their mini biographies, when it is not a bio of them but of Crowley. It is a bit tedious in that respect especially when you learn such and such an acquaintance of Crowley’s father’s friend’ was a butcher and started wearing pants on Tuesdays in 1902. OK not that bad but you get the pt. Rant over 🙂

    #59570

    wolf354
    Participant

    93,

    "seeyouintheentity" wrote:
    I can’t see the point of bothering with Francis King …

    Because he also published “Crowley on Christ”? (I think you weren’t referring to this book in particular…)
    Best regards,

    #59571

    chuck
    Participant
    "lashtal" wrote:
    To kick off the new LAShTAL Reading Circle, let’s start with the revised and expanded edition of Richard Kaczynski’s Perdurabo.

    93

    How about some actual discussion of this fine book and/or it’s subject? I’ll start. On page 194 – in a list of the people who testified against Aleister -“the chauffeur, Charles Randle” is mentioned. I never knew AC had a chauffeur.
    I never knew he had a car. Does anybody know what kind of car? Any photos? Talk about a cool collectible item for an obsessed completist…

    93 93/93

    Chuck

    #59572

    Sol2Sol
    Participant

    I’m up to chapter 11 presently. So far I’m enjoying the book, but at times I’m finding myself wanting to read more details(Boleskine House) or less details(bios of people who were briefly associated with AC.)
    That said, Perdurabo is one of the best, if not the best, bios I’ve read on Crowley.

    #59573

    gmugmble
    Participant

    So what happened between pages 237 and 238? There’s clearly at least a paragraph of text missing. Has no one else noticed this?

    #59574

    Sol2Sol
    Participant
    "gmugmble" wrote:
    So what happened between pages 237 and 238? There’s clearly at least a paragraph of text missing. Has no one else noticed this?

    I read through those pages this AM and thought the very same thing. I turned the page and was like ??? I thought I must have skipped a page but no.

    #59575

    lashtal
    Keymaster
    "gmugmble" wrote:
    So what happened between pages 237 and 238? There’s clearly at least a paragraph of text missing. Has no one else noticed this?

    My thanks to Dr Kaczynski for this response:

    I noted there was some question on the transition between pages 237 and 238, namely whether something was missing. I have checked the original text and there is a “section break” (a blank line) at the bottom of 237, and the paragraph at the top of 238, unindented, indicates the start of a fresh section. The first edition of “Perdurabo” had dingbats between section breaks, but the new edition uses blank lines: I think it’s cleaner, but unfortunately the section break is unclear in this instance. Those with the first (2002) edition can compare the text on page 190 to the new edition’s pages 237-238 and see that nothing has been omitted.

    #59576

    Sol2Sol
    Participant

    Paul, thank you very much for getting and sharing that information with us. Clears that up. Back to reading now… : )

    #59577

    Lucius
    Participant

    inneresting bit on RDowneyJR in Entertainment weekly i hear, about how he did quote White Magick to prepare for ironman. maybe it was already mentioned here but just thought it fit

    I definitely found this interesting as well, and a particularly good omen for my reading experience! Although clearly “Iron Man” wasn’t overtly referencing the occult as, say, “Chemical Wedding” was in the long run I enjoy it on that level far more than most of the tedious sensationalistic films which utilize magical concepts or characters.
    “Iron Man” was funny. It was about a man who thought he knew exactly who he was finding out who he really was and where he was going, so finding out about RD Jr’s occult practices prior to filming was quite a thought provoking surprise.

    #59578

    christibrany
    Participant

    I am still enjoying the book. I am at the part almost to roughly half way through where AC and Dempsey/Desti/Sturges find the villa for the rest of writing book four. Or at least the second part.

    I am glad he seems to have (Kacsynski) slackened a bit at least recently in this part of the book from over describing ACs acquaintances backgrounds. It was a bit too much earlier and now it is nice to focus on just the man.

    From a more disappointing stand point, although I am loving the book and all the detail put into, I am a bit saddened at the apparent slacking off of the novelistic style of writing that was used in the beginning.
    The very first chapter that was written like a novel like you are really there in Crowley’s shoes was great, and when the tone slowly shifted to more of a typical biography i was a bit sad. I really enjoyed the intimacy that the novelistic feel of the beginning gave to the reader.

    Anyone else like that too?

    Still overall far more positives than negatives!

    #59579

    einDoppelganger
    Participant

    I’m fascinated by the “Lamp of the Invisible Light” – or LIL… I wonder what ever became of them. I suppose the most likely answer is they dissolved. I imagine the membership was tiny if it even extended beyond Crowley and Don Jesus de Medina-Sidonia. Still…

    The romantic in me hopes there is a secret order still going among the shadows of Mexican border towns.

    S

    #59580

    wolf354
    Participant

    93,
    After finishing the “Golden Dawn” chapter … hopefully someone will have a very hard research and will write Allan Bennet’s Biography, the scattered stories that survive from this period of his life are amazing. Perdurabo’s book as a very similar information (about Bennet) to the “The Revival of Magick” … of course this book isn’t about Ananda Metteya …
    Best regards,

    #59581

    einDoppelganger
    Participant

    Agreed!

    John Crow has written a biography of Allan Bennet if I am not mistaken. It ws a privately published academic work.

    Kenneth Grant has the wand mentioned in the book if I am not mistaken. I believe its pictured in Outside the Circles of Time.

    Scott

    #59582

    Sol2Sol
    Participant

    I’m getting ready to start chapter 19 as soon as I finish this post. The book really picks up mid-way and I can’t put it down for long.

    I’m a little disappointed that even though we have so much detail and info on AC’s acquaintances, other details about Crowley are left out. I’ve always been very interested in his time in New Orleans, which was covered, but left out any mention of the Old Absinthe House that Crowley enjoyed, and wrote The Green Goddess in. I don’t believe The Green Goddess was mentioned either. Minor issue though. The book as a whole is a wonderful read.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 97 total)
  • You must be logged-in to reply to this topic.