Home Forums Aleister Crowley People The man behind Amado Crowley

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  • #8061

    Anonymous

    Amado Crowley was known as Mike to students and friends as his real name was Michael Paul Finbar Walker. His communication address in 2000, was Dr. M P Walker, 16 Charlotte Street, Brighton, BN2 1AG. He died in hospital in Burgundy, France on the morning of 6th February 2010. His body was brought back to England and the funeral took place on the morning of the 19th February 2010 at the Woodland Burial Ground, Bear Road Cemetry in Brighton. Michael Walker was buried next to his mother. Details can be verified by contacing the cemetery.

    On the 15th September 1962 the marriage took place between Michael Paul Finbar Walker and Lillian Shu Chao Pang at the Registry Office, Huddersfield. Michael states on the marriage certificate that he was formerly known as Vernon Leslie Walker, is 31 years old, is a University medical research worker and resides at 63, Swan Lane, Lockwood, Huddersfield. His father’s name is Leslie Walker. The rank or profession box has no details entered, so he could be retired. Lillian Pang states that she is 35 years old, is a Pathologist BSc MD PhD and resides at 9, Chatsworth Road, London NW2. Her father’s name is Chi Ta Pang, a medical practitioner. Several of her works can be downloaded from the internet. As of 2012, she is still listed in the London telephone directory.

    On the 13th February 1931, Vernon Leslie Walker was born at the Huddersfield Municipal Maternity Home. His mother was Edna Walker (nee Steele) and his father was Leslie Walker a Railway Platelayer. The address given is 7, Bridge Street, Lockwood, Huddersfield.

    On the 4th October 1930 the marriage took place in the parish church, Lockwood, Huddersfield between Leslie Walker aged 25, a Platelayer of 19, Lower Well house, Golcar, Huddersfield and Edna Steele aged 21, of 7 Bridges Street, Huddersfield. Leslie’s father is John Walker, a mason’s labourer and Edna’s father is George Steele, a miner.

    On the 3rd November 1935, Edna Walker gave birth to a daughter named Rita Ann. The father was Leslie Walker, a platelayer and the address given is 16, Back Bradford Road, Huddersfield. Rita Ann died in the December quarter of 1936.

    The claim made by Amado in his writings is that he is the biological son of Aleister Crowley. In his book The Secrets of Aleister Crowley, he explains that Aleister Crowley went to great lengths in order to have sexual relations with Amado’s mother (Stella in the story) and is even supposed to have planned not only the exact location where the conception would occur but even the ‘polarity’ (orientation?) of the bed. The conception occurred in a room in a chateau near to Boulogne during the first night of a ‘naughty weekend’ that had been planned and paid for by Len Standish; the boyfriend of Stella. A taxi came for Stella and drove her on  a short journey through the night to a champagne party in a chateau. While she was in the clutches of the ‘Great Beast’, Len was befriended at a bar by an Englishman who explained that he had just had some luck at a casino and was going to ‘paint the town red’. He invited Len to join him and even started Len off with a modest stake and in the space of five hours, Len had won four hundred pounds. When Stella awoke in the modest hotel in Boulogne, she wondered if it had all been a dream. She realised that she would have to make it up to her husband Len and salvage their naughty weekend.
    Len was shocked when Stella told him that she was pregnant just a few weeks after the weekend in France. They were married two months later in a registry office. Len couldn’t work out how he was responsible; but knew that Stella hadn’t been out with another man. This implies that Len didn’t have sex with his girlfriend/fiancée during weekend away. This must have made him annoyed as he had spent a small fortune on the event and didn’t even get to enjoy a naughty weekend.
    The pair moved into a small rented house and Andrew Standish (Amado) was born on the 26th January 1930. A huge toy rabbit was delivered for the new baby (from Aleister) and Stella explained that it was from the baby’s grandad Wilfred who was a coalminer living in Kent. Stella’s mother quickly corrected her, stating that his grandad’s name was George. Everyone thought the baby looked more like his mother than his father.

    There are several problems with this story. Aleister tells Stella at the start of the ferry journey to Boulogne that a car will arrive at the hotel at 9’oclock that same night. The journey across the channel takes about two hours so in order for Stella and Len to make the crossing, disembark, collect their luggage, get to the hotel, check in and sort themselves out, they must have left Folkestone no later than 5 pm. This means that they would have had to leave their home in Yorkshire about 9.30 am. as the train journey would have taken at least five and a half hours in 1929. The working day was until at least 6 pm. and they would both have had to somehow arrange to have the Friday and the Saturday off work as people worked a six-day week in 1929 with the lucky ones working a five and a half day week. They would have had to forgo their wages; and in 1929 every single farthing counted! So it is highly unlikely that Len and Stella could have had a naughty weekend in Boulogne as they each would have to have had two days off work in order to accomplish the weekend away and lose two days pay.
    Why would a total stranger befriend Len and give him a stake? Are we to suppose that Aleister arranged this as well? Four hundred pounds was definitely a small fortune, it was the equivalent three and a half year’s wages for Len! Len, Stella and family didn’t move into better accommodation and there is no mention of how the money was spent.

    The conservative estimate of the costs of a weekend away in 1929 is £25 12s (twenty five pounds and twelve shillings).
    A railway worker’s wage was around £3 3s per working week, so this would use up about eight weeks worth of pay.
    Putting aside 10 shillings per month it would take over five years.
    Putting away £1 per month would take over two years.
    Putting away £3 per month would take just over eight months.
    Len would not be able to go on the spur of the moment; the weekend would take a lot of time to plan. Len was working in a very lowly job. He wouldn’t have much education as he probably left school when 14 years old. Railway workers had to work a 12 hour day (6am. to 6pm.) and for 6 days a week.

    There are other problems/inconsistencies. On pages 141 – 143 of The Riddles of Aleister Crowley, Amado explains how he had an operation to correct an undescended testicle whilst doing his national service. He goes on to say that the man (Bernie Tocker)in the bed next to him is also in for the same operation, shares the same birthday, was also both born at four o’clock in the afternoon and that Bernie’s late father was a magician; albeit a stage magician. Yet on page 21 Aleister is claimed to have said to Amado that the undescended testicle was put right he was five years old. Which is the truth? On page 33 of The Secrets of Aleister Crowley, Amado states that he was born on the 26th January 1930. Which is correct, 26th January or 13th February?.

    Michael Walker (formerly Vernon Leslie) was born on Friday 13th February 1931. On page 237 of The History of British Magick After Crowley, by Dave Evans, the last day that Aleister Crowley was in France was (Tuesday) 16th Aril 1929. If Aleister Crowley did meet up with Michael Walker’s mother it would have had to have been Friday 12th April as the alleged ‘naughty weekend’ would have been Saturday 13th and Sunday 14th April. If the pregnancy was a normal 38 weeks duration, the birth would have occurred around the 3rd January 1930 (Friday) and not over three weeks later on the 26th January 1930 (Sunday) as stated in the book The Secrets of Aleister Crowley. As already shown above, Vernon Leslie Walker was born on Friday 13th February 1931, so the pregnancy would have lasted over 21 months! He wasn’t the biological son of Aleister Crowley.

    Birth and Marriage records can be obtained from the General Register Office, PO Box 2, Southport, Merseyside, PR8 2JD, United Kingdom.

    Marriage between Michael Paul Finbar Walker and Lillian Shu Chao Pang: Year 1962. Quarter: SEP.  Volume: 0213. Page:155S.
    Birth of Vernon Leslie Walker: Year 1931. Quarter: MAR.  Volume: 09a. Page: 418.
    Marriage of Leslie Walker and Edna Steele: Year 1930. Quarter: DEC.  Volume: 09a. Page 619.
    Birth of Rita Ann Walker: Year 1935. Quarter DEC. Volume: 9B.  Page: 376.

    The death certificate can be obtained by contacting the French Embassy in London.

    Amado was not the son of Aleister Crowley, he was a self-proclaimed ‘Master’ who set up several ‘Occult Communes’ between 1962 and 2003. Amado had always wanted to have a rural occult commune that would be the basis of an occult ‘University’. The grand plan was to have several communes that were under the auspices of the one in Derbyshire. In 2003 Amado announced that he was founding a new occult order and members who signed up could expect formal training in the theory and practice of magic as well as a manual of rituals. This was quickly followed by the launch of the occult ‘University’. Residential study courses became available for students and prospective students, but in 2008, the whole project collapsed when the bulk of students decide to leave (a pattern that had been played out in previous communes). The occult order was never mentioned again and both the training and the manual never materialised. In 2009 Amado decided to go and live in the one remaining commune in Burgundy, France.

    In 1973 Amado produced  ‘The Magus’. A privately published booklet that explained Aleister Crowley’s reputation, beliefs and teachings. A first edition copy is currently for sale on Amazon for £135 and is being sold by David Ford Books. He also has a copy of volume 7 of Liber Lucis and this is also for sale on Amazon for £95. In 1975 Amado produced Liber Alba, a list of questions asked by would be occult students. He claimed that he wasn’t allowed to advertise, yet he had a long-running advert in The Fellowship of the Sphinx, an online contacts service. He wasn’t ‘The Chalice 777’, he didn’t usher in the ‘Aeon of Horus’, and he didn’t publish the ‘Book of Desolation’; which was a fabrication of his own wild imagination. He would have probably fared better if he had told the truth about himself.

    #76719

    Azidonis
    Participant

    Wonderfully informative post. Thanks for placing it here.

    #76720

    michaelclarke18
    Participant

    Thanks – yes, some great and very thorough research there. He certainly seems more interested in fabricating someone else’s will, rather than his own. But it never-the-less confirms my belief that ”Amedo” – together with all of his books – can be safely ignored.

    #76721

    Los
    Participant

    How exactly did anyone get fooled by this guy to begin with?

    #76722

    Shiva
    Participant

    Some people actually got fooled?

    “A SUCKER IS BORN EVERY MINUTE.”
    – Liber 333, Chapter 88

    #76723

    Michael Staley
    Participant
    "Los" wrote:
    How exactly did anyone get fooled by this guy to begin with?

    Having been around in the early 1970s when Amado popped up, I don’t think that anyone was fooled.

    Amado claimed to be the fruit of Crowley’s loins, doubtless one of a fair few. More to the point, he also claimed to be Crowley’s appointed heir, prepared by his “father” to be his successor. Later, he declared himself to be the Messiah of the Aeon of Horus; Crowley had been akin to John the Baptist, sent to prepare the way for Amado.

    Having met Amado a couple of times in the early 1970s, exchanged a few letters with him and spoke to him on the phone once, I thought he was an interesting chap, but I never considered him A.C.’s sprog, let alone entertained the more grandiose claims. As I remember, my sceptical view was widespread.

    So no mystery there, Los.

    #76724

    Los
    Participant
    "MichaelStaley" wrote:
    I don’t think that anyone was fooled.

    Well, this Amado character apparently had “students,” and they probably did accept his claims. Someone was attending his “Occult University” and “Communes” and whatnot. I recall reading something by Dave Evans in which he explained that Amado sent students to attend Evans’ academic papers and report back to Amado what was being said about him.

    Point being, there appear to be some people who were fooled by what is a totally transparent bullshit story. I’m just amazed that anybody could be duped by a story so lame.

    #76725

    michaelclarke18
    Participant

    I’m just amazed that anybody could be duped by a story so lame.

    There are lots of examples where the story has been lame, but what was delivered was good. In Amado’s case the books were ordinary and made some quite large claims. All in all rather vacuous….

    #76726

    William Thirteen
    Participant

    i would think scanning a brief survey of human history would suffice to convince the reader that mankind’s gullibility is the rule rather than the exception. 

    #76727

    Michael Staley
    Participant
    "Los" wrote:
    Well, this Amado character apparently had “students,” and they probably did accept his claims. Someone was attending his “Occult University” and “Communes” and whatnot. I recall reading something by Dave Evans in which he explained that Amado sent students to attend Evans’ academic papers and report back to Amado what was being said about him.

    Point being, there appear to be some people who were fooled by what is a totally transparent bullshit story. I’m just amazed that anybody could be duped by a story so lame.

    I met a few of Amado’s students at one of his public meetings. They didn’t strike me as weak-minded dupes. I doubt that any of them became his students simply because he alleged that he was Crowley’s child. They would have come to a judgement of Amado as a man and as a teacher, based on their impressions of him and what he had to say. The fact is that, in the flesh, Amado had charisma, even if that did not carry over into his written works.

    I never read any of Amado’s books, so cannot agree or disagree with Michael Clarke’s remarks. I did though read Amado’s magazine Liber Lucis when it appeared in the early 1970s. Much of it I didn’t care for particularly, but some of it I found useful at the time.

    Point being, I doubt that any of Amado’s students were his students because of his story about who his father was, so your amazement is spawned by dubious assumptions. Still, good sound-bites, eh?

    #76728

    belmurru
    Participant

    Would it be fair to guess that HE believed he was Crowley’s son, and that this is partly what gave him the confidence and charisma that led him to have some followers?

    The story was obviously important to him, so either he was a simple con artist or a genuinely self-deluded crank. At least we can grant the latter a little sympathy.

    #76729

    Michael Staley
    Participant
    "belmurru" wrote:
    Would it be fair to guess that HE believed he was Crowley’s son, and that this is partly what gave him the confidence and charisma that led him to have some followers?

    That’s a possibility, certainly. Whilst in India in the early 1980s I went to visit the English guru Dadaji, who had met Crowley at some stage and who had emigrated to India in the early 1950s. Dadaji mentioned to me that he had received a letter from Amado asking if he (Dadaji) could remember being one of several people at a meeting where Crowley had introduced the young Amado as his heir. Dadaji hadn’t been able to recall such a meeting during his acquaintance with Crowley, so was unable to help. I believe that Amado was writing to various people at the time with a connection to Crowley. It’s possible that he was doing this in order to consolidate a hoax; on the other hand, perhaps he did believe it and was searching for some sort of verification.

    During the first of my two meetings with Amado in the early 1970s, he asked me whether I thought that he looked like “my father”. When after consideration and in all honesty I replied “no”, he didn’t seem bothered, perplexed or insulted in any way; we just continued our conversations.

    From the little contact I had with him, I rather liked the man, irrespective of the fact that I did not accept his claims.

    #76730

    Los
    Participant
    "MichaelStaley" wrote:
    I doubt that any of Amado’s students were his students because of his story about who his father was

    It is your contention, then, that the majority of Amado’s students did not accept one of his most important claims?

    To put it another way, it is your contention that the majority of Amado’s students thought that their teacher was mistaken on a point that he himself considered fundamental to his identity?

    #76731

    the_real_simon_iff
    Participant
    "Los" wrote:
    It is your contention, then, that the majority of Amado’s students did not accept one of his most important claims?

    Los, 93!

    I don’t know if you have read Amado’s work. I did (somewhat reluctantly and more out of “historical” interest), and although there was never any doubt to me that this man wasn’t Crowley’s son, it was more or less a”general” Western system of occultism he taught, the knowledge of which he incidentally claimed to have learned and inherited from his “father” Crowley. Maybe he still was quite a good teacher. Isn’t that totally unimportant anyway?

    Or to put it another was: Is it YOUR contention, then, that the majority of Crowley’s students do (should) not accept one of his most important claims? I mean, Crowley’s stories are rather wild too, aren’t they?

    Love=Law
    Lutz

    #76732

    michaelclarke18
    Participant

    Good point the_real_simon_iff. Even though he may have been a fraud, then may have been one or two good things in his teaching that he borrowed from elsewhere. And it may well have been those that he students were initially attracted to.

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