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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
24/04/2010 1:36 pm  

Moderator's Note

This is a new thread derived from one now locked. For context, read the locked thread.

"David Beth" wrote:
The esoteric book market, especially since self publication is made easy, is being flooded with works on the Qabalah, on Goetic magic and on ´dark´ paths of occultism. Very few of those offerings show any kind of quality or depth ...

David,
I can't help, but I consider Karlsson's book to be precisely this. Just another magic cook book about dark path. The whole section on Goetia is just a material recycled from the Grimoire, with few anecdotes appended at the end. To me it doesn't even seem to cohere with the rest of the text, as if Karlsson just needed to fill the odd 50 pages to make for a publishable volume (I had the Edition Roter Drache, 2.Aufl., maybe the more recent editions were improved by Karlsson).
The passage on Qliphoth and Tunnels disappointed me also. Grant is barely mentioned, Karlsson just gives some examples of (his?) visions, which are interesting, however to get more of it, he advises his readers to join his dark order. Actually, some passages of the book sound like outright marketing for Dragon Rouge eg the LHP taught in DR offers you 11 grades instead of the tradtional 10, LHPs are able to explore 8 chakram instead of the traditional 7.
The section on kabala certainly stands out. It is refreshing to read about the jewish kabala and its origins. However, any magician approaching the jewish kabala will have to be extremely selective, because:
- most of the jewish kabala is unpublished and if it is, then exclusively in hebrew
- most of the jewish kabala is disconnected nonsense (as I've been told by one chassid)
- jewish kabalists, including the lurianic school, considered the 'self-denial and escapisms expressed by the sephirothic ascend presided over by Jahwe' to be the essential part of their kabala
With such an selective approach, I wonder whether it wouldn't be more useful for Karlsson just to leave jewish kabala to the jews and to explain his dark theories and visions in the terms of thelemic, voudon, tantric or alchemistic framework.
Lastly I expected Karlsson, judging by the scholarly appearence of the book, to discuss Crowley or Blavatsky, who introduced the term LHP to the Western esotericism. In this respect, Karsson's book fails altogether, just like most of the books on LHP.

All in all, to me the book seems to have been first intended for the small swedisch occult scene - and probably is remarkable by these standards. However on the global occult book market it is just average quality.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
24/04/2010 3:14 pm  

Many thanks for re-opening the thread Paul. For ease of access David Beth's foreword to Thomas Karlsson´s book Qabalah, Qliphoth and Goetic Magic can be found here ~

The Dark Doctrine

Kind regards,

Craig.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
24/04/2010 3:16 pm  

Interesting points raised here I believe. I do think some of the criticism is correct. I believe though Karlsson´s book serves quite well as an introduction and outline to the Qliphotic worlds, it is approachable and readable and provides interesting background information to working with the Nightside Qabalah. He bases his speculations and interpretations on interesting sources and against a research-background - this is something I can much appreciate. Of course I personally would have liked a more in depths treatise on Shunya or Kaivalya but maybe Karlsson intended his book not for the specialist but more as an introduction.
I hoped with my foreword to give a few more extra angles when dealing with the Nightside and add a perspective coming from traditions which have been working with these energies for a very long time and which had not been mentioned: Voudon Gnosis and Northern Gnosis.

All in all, I must say that I enjoyed Karlsson´s book for what I think it was intended to be: a well researched (the cabalistic part), readable and approachable introduction to the nightside work.

Best
David

"matus.simkovic" wrote:
Moderator's Note

This is a new thread derived from one now locked. For context, read the locked thread.

"David Beth" wrote:
The esoteric book market, especially since self publication is made easy, is being flooded with works on the Qabalah, on Goetic magic and on ´dark´ paths of occultism. Very few of those offerings show any kind of quality or depth ...

David,
I can't help, but I consider Karlsson's book to be precisely this. Just another magic cook book about dark path. The whole section on Goetia is just a material recycled from the Grimoire, with few anecdotes appended at the end. To me it doesn't even seem to cohere with the rest of the text, as if Karlsson just needed to fill the odd 50 pages to make for a publishable volume (I had the Edition Roter Drache, 2.Aufl., maybe the more recent editions were improved by Karlsson).
The passage on Qliphoth and Tunnels disappointed me also. Grant is barely mentioned, Karlsson just gives some examples of (his?) visions, which are interesting, however to get more of it, he advises his readers to join his dark order. Actually, some passages of the book sound like outright marketing for Dragon Rouge eg the LHP taught in DR offers you 11 grades instead of the tradtional 10, LHPs are able to explore 8 chakram instead of the traditional 7.
The section on kabala certainly stands out. It is refreshing to read about the jewish kabala and its origins. However, any magician approaching the jewish kabala will have to be extremely selective, because:
- most of the jewish kabala is unpublished and if it is, then exclusively in hebrew
- most of the jewish kabala is disconnected nonsense (as I've been told by one chassid)
- jewish kabalists, including the lurianic school, considered the 'self-denial and escapisms expressed by the sephirothic ascend presided over by Jahwe' to be the essential part of their kabala
With such an selective approach, I wonder whether it wouldn't be more useful for Karlsson just to leave jewish kabala to the jews and to explain his dark theories and visions in the terms of thelemic, voudon, tantric or alchemistic framework.
Lastly I expected Karlsson, judging by the scholarly appearence of the book, to discuss Crowley or Blavatsky, who introduced the term LHP to the Western esotericism. In this respect, Karsson's book fails altogether, just like most of the books on LHP.

All in all, to me the book seems to have been first intended for the small swedisch occult scene - and probably is remarkable by these standards. However on the global occult book market it is just average quality.


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Anonymous
 Anonymous
(@Anonymous)
Joined: 1 second ago
Posts: 0
24/04/2010 4:51 pm  

The introduction is pretty good I must say, and showing deep understanding
David Beths in the area of qliphotic work, even more deeper than Karlssons as far as I am concerned, although the introduction is much shorter. Karlssons book is ok, but I do not think it is groundbreaking in any way and it is pretty sad that scholar like Karlsson infuses a part about Goetia in his book just to fill the blank pages, which could have been done even by the most poor of the sinners, who has read two or three books about Goetia. And all of us know that there are many average books about this area. The only interesting concept about Goetia he writes about is the so called faustian idea of accessing the goetic spirit realms without the circle during the rituals. Indeed, it is an interesting idea having its own dangers and additional potential in comparison with the traditional idea of separation between the magician and the geotic demons…
Nevertheless the part about nightside is nice structured and for the beginners in this area certainly helpful and insightful, alhough I do not like this black-white perspective which is always there when some talks about kabbala and the nightside tree. The work done in the voudon gnosis and hyperborean gnosis is certainly not dualistic as this is for example implied in the kabbalistic and all the traditional hermetic societies working with this frame of thought.
For example, the grimoire ghuedhe is for someone who has a dualistic Weltanschauung certainly qliphotic, but I would not assume that the real voudon gnostics sees it this way. Although it is not am easy area for work and not for beginners, the ghuedhe loa are not evil, in fact they are just helpful in showing us our own rigid and blind illusory concepts as by inducing intense experiences of death, life and sex. They are just as they are, and the can induce powerful transformations –maybe in a violent manner- but nevertheless very powerful. In opposition to that, I have always the feeling the occultists with dualistic Weltanschuung who talk much about the qliphotic work and who like to emphasize their work with qliphoth , and how they will become godlike thru this work( as it is the case with the average member of DR) are just too simple-minded and powerless and certainly not cool as they think they are, just because their working with the “evil” forces. In the hyperborean and voudon gnosis there is not this simple minded attitude about good and evil, and even when it is the story about the black sun in the kosmic gnosis, I wouldn’t equate the hyperborean black sun with the black sun about which karlsson talks when he is explaining the qlipha thagirion, the backside of tiphareth… the hyperborean Sun is much “higher” in its being or rather non-being and more potent than the nightside black sun, that appears in the wiritings of Karlsson when he is mentioning the sphere thagirion.

Now back to David beth’s instruction: I am quite interested about David Beth concepts of reversal of the chakras and counterclock rotation of the chakras, it seems to be a very interesting idea, I am not much familiar with. Would like to read more about it- maybe we will read more about it in the new voudon gnosis-book?
The sex magical and metaphysical concept he mentions as a doorway and access to the nightside is very much intriguing, I would like to read more about that. I assume, that part of it and a seed of this concept can be found in the M7R writings, but nevertheless it would be very interesting the read more about results Mr. Beth has done in his occult experiments and research.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
24/04/2010 10:49 pm  

Dear Sitch,

I am hard pressed with time right now but I can say that the concept of the reversal of rotation is something which I have studied within the gnosis of the fraternitas borealis which teaches about precisely this when the initiate has become a blood-luminary in its full sense and achieves the kosmic resurrection after which he is no longer guided by the golden sun but the ´other sun´. I will elaborate much on this topic in a book which I hope to finish this year and which deals with the gnosis and sorcery of the Frat. Bor.
However, I will add soem new chapters to the new edition of Voudon Gnosis, one which will deal with the esoteric voudon approach to the qliphotic gnosis as taught within the Societe Voudon Gnostique and which will go into similar territory as my preface for Karlsson just much more in depth obviously.

Best
David

"Sitch_Boe" wrote:
The introduction is pretty good I must say, and showing deep understanding
David Beths in the area of qliphotic work, even more deeper than Karlssons as far as I am concerned, although the introduction is much shorter. Karlssons book is ok, but I do not think it is groundbreaking in any way and it is pretty sad that scholar like Karlsson infuses a part about Goetia in his book just to fill the blank pages, which could have been done even by the most poor of the sinners, who has read two or three books about Goetia. And all of us know that there are many average books about this area. The only interesting concept about Goetia he writes about is the so called faustian idea of accessing the goetic spirit realms without the circle during the rituals. Indeed, it is an interesting idea having its own dangers and additional potential in comparison with the traditional idea of separation between the magician and the geotic demons…
Nevertheless the part about nightside is nice structured and for the beginners in this area certainly helpful and insightful, alhough I do not like this black-white perspective which is always there when some talks about kabbala and the nightside tree. The work done in the voudon gnosis and hyperborean gnosis is certainly not dualistic as this is for example implied in the kabbalistic and all the traditional hermetic societies working with this frame of thought.
For example, the grimoire ghuedhe is for someone who has a dualistic Weltanschauung certainly qliphotic, but I would not assume that the real voudon gnostics sees it this way. Although it is not am easy area for work and not for beginners, the ghuedhe loa are not evil, in fact they are just helpful in showing us our own rigid and blind illusory concepts as by inducing intense experiences of death, life and sex. They are just as they are, and the can induce powerful transformations –maybe in a violent manner- but nevertheless very powerful. In opposition to that, I have always the feeling the occultists with dualistic Weltanschuung who talk much about the qliphotic work and who like to emphasize their work with qliphoth , and how they will become godlike thru this work( as it is the case with the average member of DR) are just too simple-minded and powerless and certainly not cool as they think they are, just because their working with the “evil” forces. In the hyperborean and voudon gnosis there is not this simple minded attitude about good and evil, and even when it is the story about the black sun in the kosmic gnosis, I wouldn’t equate the hyperborean black sun with the black sun about which karlsson talks when he is explaining the qlipha thagirion, the backside of tiphareth… the hyperborean Sun is much “higher” in its being or rather non-being and more potent than the nightside black sun, that appears in the wiritings of Karlsson when he is mentioning the sphere thagirion.

Now back to David beth’s instruction: I am quite interested about David Beth concepts of reversal of the chakras and counterclock rotation of the chakras, it seems to be a very interesting idea, I am not much familiar with. Would like to read more about it- maybe we will read more about it in the new voudon gnosis-book?
The sex magical and metaphysical concept he mentions as a doorway and access to the nightside is very much intriguing, I would like to read more about that. I assume, that part of it and a seed of this concept can be found in the M7R writings, but nevertheless it would be very interesting the read more about results Mr. Beth has done in his occult experiments and research.

Quote:

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michaelclarke18
(@michaelclarke18)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1278
25/04/2010 8:54 am  

Interesting points raised here I believe. I do think some of the criticism is correct. I believe though Karlsson´s book serves quite well as an introduction and outline to the Qliphotic worlds, it is approachable and readable and provides interesting background information to working with the Nightside Qabalah.

I found Karlsson´s book pretty good, though I found it rather historical & not especially practical. A fair proportion of the work, I have seen in other places and I felt there was little new research - but I definitely look forward to additional work from David Beth.

he is no longer guided by the golden sun but the ´other sun´

Could this possibly have any relationship with the Black Sun, as referenced in 'Liber Niger Solis' - in the grimoire produced by Arcanum Ordo Nigri Solis?

Very few people seem to have heard of it, but I found it a rather unusual read.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
25/04/2010 4:07 pm  

Hi Michael,

there will be much additonal work on this area coming up. In regards to the Liber Nigri Solis, I have looked through it and found it partly very interesting, although the approach in this book differs from the one I mentioned although it may also cover similar ground here and there. The use of the black sun glyph has become rather inflatious these days and there is a huge amount of different ideas attached to it.
Best
David


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
04/05/2010 4:29 pm  

I can't help, but I consider Karlsson's book to be precisely this. Just another magic cook book about dark path. The whole section on Goetia is just a material recycled from the Grimoire, with few anecdotes appended at the end. To me it doesn't even seem to cohere with the rest of the text, as if Karlsson just needed to fill the odd 50 pages to make for a publishable volume (I had the Edition Roter Drache, 2.Aufl., maybe the more recent editions were improved by Karlsson).
The passage on Qliphoth and Tunnels disappointed me also. Grant is barely mentioned, Karlsson just gives some examples of (his?) visions, which are interesting, however to get more of it, he advises his readers to join his dark order. Actually, some passages of the book sound like outright marketing for Dragon Rouge eg the LHP taught in DR offers you 11 grades instead of the tradtional 10, LHPs are able to explore 8 chakram instead of the traditional 7.
The section on kabala certainly stands out. It is refreshing to read about the jewish kabala and its origins.

To relate to the part on Goetia one has to relate to both Dragon Rouge and the history of the book. The book was first published in Swedish and in a time when it was (and still is) the only book which was including Goetia in Swedish. So when the book was first published it filled a gap in Sweden. As described in the book is Goetia aswell as an important part of the magical system of that order and the different demons are attributed to the different Qliphas. So there is a clear connection there between the Qliphas and the Goetia.

The passage on Qliphoth and Tunnels disappointed me also

Ok...?

IMO this is the best book available for money which describes the different Qliphas.

Grant is barely mentioned

Yes...? Not to in any way disparage the work of Grant, which I respect, though what he describes is his own experiences of sitra ahra and not necessarily always based on original jewish speculations on the Qliphoth. For me it´s obvious that if you want to describe something like this you go as much as possible to the original sources.

Actually, some passages of the book sound like outright marketing for Dragon Rouge eg the LHP taught in DR offers you 11 grades instead of the tradtional 10, LHPs are able to explore 8 chakram instead of the traditional 7.

That was not my impression when I read the book.

Why should 11 chakras be better then 7? Or 11 degrees be better then 10? What he tries to describe is that the goal of their initiation is something which they experience to be beyond what is normally decribed in western esotericism. I can´t see anywhere making of a value that this goal should be better then the experience of unio mystica or samadhi.

I think Karlsson is aiming to be honest.

With such an selective approach, I wonder whether it wouldn't be more useful for Karlsson just to leave jewish kabala to the jews and to explain his dark theories and visions in the terms of thelemic, voudon, tantric or alchemistic framework.

Well this kind of critisism can you do to the whole western esoteric tradition since the christian qabalists when they begun to integrate qabala in their doctrines and practices.

I get the impression that you have not really checked out the facts. He is in fact using both a tantric and alchemistic framework for describing the initiation that is taking place in Dragon Rouge. Why he should use thelemic or voudo goes beyond my horizon... In my knowledge he is neither a thelemite or have described himself asa practitioner of voudo.

Lastly I expected Karlsson, judging by the scholarly appearence of the book, to discuss Crowley or Blavatsky, who introduced the term LHP to the Western esotericism. In this respect, Karsson's book fails altogether, just like most of the books on LHP.

Why would he? This book is not in anyway being described as a summary of how the concept of LHP have entered the western sphere of ideas. It´s a book on Qabala, Qliphot and Goetia just as the title states.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
05/05/2010 12:28 pm  

First of all, thanks to Paul for relaunching the thread a to David for responding to my post.

@ 2109,
it's nice to see some fans of Karlsson posting here.

The idea that

the goal of their initiation is something which they experience to be beyond what is normally decribed in western esotericism

seems ridiculous to me. It suggests, that there is something like an oasis of enlightenment, in this particular case located in sweden. It also suggests that some person achieved phenomenological states not achieved before. (And it doesn't matter whether he/she considers these states as ‚higher' or ‚lower'). I think the human spiritual evolution (if something like that exists at all) is more continuos and accompanied by changes in culture, morality and society as a whole.
If anyone claims to have discovered something beyond what other occultists found, I would consider the following options:

1. Either he has attributed too much validity to his own spiritual visions.
2. Or he knows nothing about western esotericism (which comes often comorbid with #1)
3. Or he is doing marketing for his occult order
4. Or he is Aleister Crowley

As you can see I rather benevolently ascribed #3 motive to Karlsson. I don't think he is dishonest. I think he honestly believes that his order can provide additional value to the spiritual life of some people and his book serves the purpose of attracting the attention of those people.
But on the whole, I don't think that Karlsson would ascribe to the idea quoted above, although his book does give such an impression. And this impression might be a sort of problem. And here is the point where David Beth's introduction comes handy. David puts Karlsson's idea into the wider context, showing that his concepts and visions are not unsimilar to the stuff introduced by other occultists.

I get the impression that you have not really checked out the facts. He is in fact using both a tantric and alchemistic framework for describing the initiation that is taking place in Dragon Rouge. Why he should use thelemic or voudo goes beyond my horizon... In my knowledge he is neither a thelemite or have described himself asa practitioner of voudo.

You misread me here. I suggested that he might have framed his theories in the tantric, alchemistic, thelemic etc. framework INSTEAD of the qabalistic one as I was pointing to the orthodoxy contained in the latter's conception of qliphoth and evil. I'm aware that Karlsson mentions tantra and alchemy, it was precisely for this reason that I suggested he might have made these topics the main theme of his book. Thelema and voudon are just my own favourites.

This book is not in any way being described as a summary of how the concept of LHP have entered the western sphere of ideas. It´s a book on Qabala, Qliphot and Goetia just as the title states.

It certainly is a book on LHP and Karlsson constantly uses the label LHP to designate his own ideas.
The term LHP is used ambigiously by modern occultists (there is a nice discussion of LHP in Dave Evans' book on Magic in Britain after Crowley). The modern usage has little to do with Crowley's original conception, since Crowley considered himself RHP (So did his predecesors Blavatsky and Waite, who also used the term LHP). Thus it has been always a bit of challenge for the alleged LHP practitioners to define themself. The more sensible approaches went on to derive the term from Hindu Vama Marga. Consequently, I was curious how Karlsson does the trick. Maybe I didn't read carefully enough, but he actually bypasses the whole issue. He shows that qabalists considered geburah evil and did attribute various unpleasant qualities to it. All the way he seems to use the term LHP interchangably with the qabalists' concept of geburah, but it remains a mystery to me, why LHP should be attributed to Geburah. Jewish qabalists don't use the term left hand path. While it is true that Geburah is to the left if you consider the tree of life from the perspective of a neophyte in malkuth or from the perspective of an adept in tiphareth; more conventional way is to consider Geburah as the right hand of Adam Kadmon. Also geburah is located to the right if you are performing the qabalistic cross of LBRP or middle pilar exercise.

I don't think it is that important to dwell on my points. Their purpose is to illustrate a more general idea. As you can see Karlsson's work doesn't fully satisfy people posting here on the topic,but they bring other points. David would wish more in-depth discussion of kaivalya and sunhya, Michael would wish Karlsson's book to be less theoretical and so on. The book isn't hailed as ‚groundbreaking'. To contrast this, Karlsson has many enthusiasts on the continent, particularly in Germany Karlsson's book is running 3rd Edition in four years. In sweden, no doubt, Karlsson's work will define the local occult scene for several decades. So there are many people on the continent, who think

this is the best book available for money which describes the different Qliphas.

However rather than deriving a conclusion about the inherent qualities of the book from this statement, I would suppose that the books with which the comparison was made were also bought in kronor. Your baseline against which you compare the book isn't that contentios and differentiated as the one of anglophone readers. If you take the example of Germany, Grant's work was unavailable and widely unknown in the german speaking world (with exception of magical revival) prior to Karlsson's book's release. Translations of Crowley's digestion of vision and the voice or his Liber 231 aren't available online. There was/is no Fulgur or Xoannon. Edition Roter Drache, the publisher of Karlsson's work, tries to fill the gap. It is currently translating and publishing Grant's works. Thus, Karlsson's book can be locally termed as the best book on qliphoth simply because there were no books on qliphoth. I suppose the same applies to sweden. In contrast, in Britain the memetic niche Karlsson aspires to, has already been occupied for several decades. The competition is tougher.
However, I would rather reserve my judgement. Even though, my experience is that works lauded by the continental occultists as groundbreaking often showed to be of mediocre quality on the global scale, Karlsson's book is special in that it actually got translated and real comparison can be made. So let's watch it.


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mika
 mika
(@mika)
Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 363
06/05/2010 12:25 am  
"matus.simkovic" wrote:
The section on kabala certainly stands out. It is refreshing to read about the jewish kabala and its origins. However, any magician approaching the jewish kabala will have to be extremely selective, because:
- most of the jewish kabala is unpublished and if it is, then exclusively in hebrew

That is absolutely incorrect. Many, many reputable english translations and analyses of hebrew kabbalah have been published and continue to be available. Here's two respected authors, to begin with:
http://www.powells.com/s?header=Search+Form&kw=aryeh+kaplan
http://www.powells.com/s?header=Search+Form&kw=gershom+scholem

"matus.simkovic" wrote:
- most of the jewish kabala is disconnected nonsense (as I've been told by one chassid)

It doesn't matter that a chassid told you this, it is also incorrect.

"matus.simkovic" wrote:
Thus, Karlsson's book can be locally termed as the best book on qliphoth simply because there were no books on qliphoth.

Perhaps not in swedish, but certainly plenty of information about the qlipoth has been available in english, as the qlipoth are discussed in the Zohar and english translations of the Zohar have been available for over 30 years now.

I participated in a Dragon Rouge ritual with Karlsson and maybe 15-20 others, last year. It was fun, and interesting, but not personally mind-blowing. Some folks I spoke with afterwards really got a lot out of it, but they were new to magick and didn't have the years of experiences I've had. For me, it was similar to rituals I've done with the IOT, OTO, Wiccan circles, and random groups of assorted pagans/magicians/whatever. I'm not dissing the Dragon Rouge or Karlsson's work, just saying it was for me like any other ceremonial magick group ritual. It seemed to me that much of the "wow that was amazing" response was influenced by a bit of gooey-eyed "I can't believe I just did a ritual with Thomas Karlsson" hero-worship. If you strip away that part, it was simply a good, solid, well-led group ritual. I would participate in another one if the opportunity came up.

Karlsson's books and order are only slightly my cup of tea, but I think they're a very good example of someone presenting the results of their personal work and creating a system of magick based on that work. There's no reason he should have to reference Grant, or anyone else for that matter. It's up to every individual to get whatever they get out of another's personal work, and then track down references and source documents as we wish to work out our own path.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
Posts: 0
10/04/2012 11:38 am  

Follow the siren:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jVrdz1ObLs&feature=related

Truely a masterpiece created by Karlsson & co


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SatansAdvocaat
(@satansadvocaat)
Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 352
12/04/2012 4:12 pm  

Have just read David Beth's introduction to Karlsson's book for the first time and found it very stimulating, although I'm not exactly sure what he has in mind when he speaks of "The aims of the Sithra Ahra...." as though it was some sort of organised entity, or group of Qabbalists with a conscious agenda ?

'Qabalah, Qliphoth and Goetic Magic'; well it achieves what its says in this label.  Found the Goetia section rather familiar, and superfluous to my interests and needs.  The academic standard is not that high, Karlsson seems to switch between scholarly presentation and the promotion of his own particular path for Dragon Rouge adherents.  To be fair, I think that the English translation does not entirely hit the spot in places.

The material on the Qabbalah of the Left, the 'Sitra Achra' or the 'Sitra di-Shamala' is generally good and comprehensive.  Actually, a substantial condensation of all of this material was made available in one of the more recondite Golden Dawn papers composed by Mathers, (I will check out the precise reference if anyone is interested), but there is more detail here.

The section on the Qlippothic Tunnels is disappointing and possibly misleading.  There is a nod to Kenneth Grant's seminal work on the Tunnels of Set, but the Goetic-Vodou-like sigils of the Genii of the Qlippoth are certainly not those of LIBER CCXXXI which is a Thelemic Holy Book and Grimoire as the original sigils clearly demonstrate.  Perhaps, it was for this reason that Karlsson gives his own, or possibly for copyright issues ?

Regards - S.A.


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SatansAdvocaat
(@satansadvocaat)
Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 352
13/04/2012 3:46 pm  

Well due to the overwhelming response of enthusiasm, here is that reference:

"The Qliphoth of the Qabalah" - "An instructional paper for students of the Golden Dawn Isis-Urania Temple.  Transcribed by W.E.H. Humphreys, 2 July 1900."  It is in most part a direct translation by MacGregor Mathers from the Latin text of Knorr von Rosenroth's 'Kabbala Denudata' - and for what its worth it knocks the socks off Karlsson's erudition.

Source: 'The Sorcerer and His Apprentice'  Edited and Introduced by R.A. Gilbert;, Aquarian Press 1983.  Gilbert omits the Hebrew names of the Qlippothic entities, presumably so casual readers do not get, at least, their fingers burned; which is a bit frustrating, although I seem to recall, Rosenroth's text does not include them either.

Regards - S.A.


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alysa
(@alysa)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 652
13/04/2012 7:20 pm  

Well, thank you very much Satan'sAdvocaat for that reference!


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pad631
(@pad631)
Member
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 51
15/04/2012 4:21 am  

@matus.simkovic

You are a pretty critical of nearly everything. So far as I could see .

Maybe we know each other.Such stile is familiar  to me from somewhere. If you were visiting Serbia.
But the coincidences are possible.
???
93


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