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Crowley Scrapbook; Englishmen and Americans.  

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dom
 dom
(@dom)
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Posts: 1814
03/01/2020 11:36 am  

Could anyone who has the Scrapbook published in the late 80s tell me what that essay is about?  Something about the difference between Englishmen and Americans where the Englishman is rude to a guy in the street (in the States) who asks him a question then the former feels guilty and returns to apologise.

Thanks.


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chuck
(@chuck)
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03/01/2020 5:39 pm  

'How To Tell An Englishman From An American' is reprinted on pages 49 and 50 of Sandy Robertson's The Aleister Crowley Scrapbook (Foulsham, London 1988). It's first appearance was in Lilliput magazine #110 (August 1946). It was originally titled 'The Young Man and The Post Office'. It is the funniest story in the world.

So to answer your question - no.


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chuck
(@chuck)
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03/01/2020 5:50 pm  

Say, brother, I guess I was rude to you just now.

So to answer your question - yes, I could and no, I won't.


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ignant666
(@ignant666)
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03/01/2020 6:58 pm  

An admirably contextually-appropriate answer from chuck.

https://www.100thmonkeypress.com/biblio/acrowley/periodicals/tell_an_englishman/englishman.pdf

Both characters in the story about the post office are Americans- the alleged shibboleth is whether you think the young man's answer is funny or not. If you are an American, you will think it is funny, and if you are an English person, you won't, according to the story.

I think it is funny, as i would, apparently, being an American. I recall this exact question ("is this story funny?") coming up here before.

 


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Jamie J Barter
(@jamiejbarter)
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04/01/2020 1:05 am  

I don't recall seeing this question before but maybe it was before my time.  I thought it was funny as well, so there must be something the matter with me being English, but it hardly amounts to being "the funniest story in the world" by a long chalk: that is a touch of  hyperbole for effect methinks.  And Tree was quite right of course: they were both damned rude.   That was arguably what made the encounter funny.  (Wasn't it??)*

Didn't John Symonds originally arrange for A.C. to get this little contribution printed in Lilliput - a magazine with which he was involved - to begin with?  Not much better than sending in a joke or funny story through to the Reader's Digest, but hey, that's all the work he could get into periodicals at the time & after all he was an undischarged unemployable bankrupt existing on the charity of followers...

Sic transit gloria mundi (in a Latin mood tonite),

Norma N Joy Conquest

* mental note to self: must dig out Sigmund Freud's book on Jokes (Which is a real hoot).


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dom
 dom
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04/01/2020 8:44 am  

Actually yeah it is funny.  Thanks for the link.  I could see it in a Laurel and Hardy or Marx Brothers movie.


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Alan_OBrien
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26/01/2020 8:50 pm  

I heard today for the first time about a man who had definite Crowleyan aspects to him. I would say he was a cross between Aleister Crowley and Frank Zappa.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Paget,_5th_Marquess_of_Anglesey

Henry Paget, 5th Marquess of Anglesey

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ignant666
(@ignant666)
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26/01/2020 8:59 pm  

Good lord, what a nut. But there appears no evidence he ever had sex with anybody, of any gender, so not very Crowleyan (or Zappaesque). And of course he was a real aristocrat and really rich, rather than pretending to be each of those things. But thanx for posting.


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Alan_OBrien
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27/01/2020 11:53 am  

@ignant666

You are right. Less Crowleyan than I thought, and Zappaesque only in appearance. But he blew a huge inheritance and had some great clothes.


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sandyboy
(@sandyboy)
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Posts: 106
27/01/2020 4:10 pm  

This is off-topic but I'm useless at navigating site. I just wanted to ask if Lashtal is aware that Weiser selling the late Nick Culpeper's Crowley collection made $100,000 for Addenbrookes hospital. As they cared for him during his last illness for stomach cancer, the money has been spent on a piece of gastrointestinal equipment to be aptly named Old Nick.

Delightful friend - still miss him.

 

 

 


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