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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
15/10/2009 8:05 am  

My apologies for my question, but I hope somebody can help me with the following. I remember years ago when I was first getting interested in Crowley I came across a quote in one of his books, it may have been Magick, where he espoused something about the importance of "bodily senses/emotions" as integral part to discovering your true will. Now recently having picked up Magick, I've tried searching through it for the quote but alas have not found it.

I may not have explained it exactly right, but I know it definitely had something to do with the senses/feelings. I remember this being the lynchpin to me beginning a study of Crowley's work and the Thelemic way of life as at the time I was mixed up in a strict religious group that forbade any acceptance of trusting your instinctives or feelings/emotions as they were "of the devil". I remember the quote I read liberated me. So now after all these years, I'm trying to find where I orginally saw/read that quote. HOpe somebody can help.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
15/10/2009 3:26 pm  
"Starman" wrote:
My apologies for my question, but I hope somebody can help me with the following. I remember years ago when I was first getting interested in Crowley I came across a quote in one of his books, it may have been Magick, where he espoused something about the importance of "bodily senses/emotions" as integral part to discovering your true will. Now recently having picked up Magick, I've tried searching through it for the quote but alas have not found it.

I may not have explained it exactly right, but I know it definitely had something to do with the senses/feelings. I remember this being the lynchpin to me beginning a study of Crowley's work and the Thelemic way of life as at the time I was mixed up in a strict religious group that forbade any acceptance of trusting your instinctives or feelings/emotions as they were "of the devil". I remember the quote I read liberated me. So now after all these years, I'm trying to find where I orginally saw/read that quote. HOpe somebody can help.

It's to know what you're referring to, so this may not be what you're looking for, but a couple of obvious possibilities leap to mind.

The first is Little Essays Toward Truth (which also showed up again later in The Book of Thoth, incidentally):

"[Innocence] is, in fact, a necessary condition of any proper contemplation of what we are accustomed to consider the first task of the Aspirant, the solution of the question, 'What is my True Will?' For until we become innocent, we are certain to try to judge our Will by some Canon of what seems 'right' or 'wrong'; in other words, we are apt to criticise our Will from the outside, whereas True Will should spring, a fountain of Light, from within, and flow unchecked, seething with Love into the Ocean of Life. This is the true idea of Silence; it is our Will which issues, perfectly elastic, sublimely Protean, to fill every interstice of the Universe of Manifestation which it meets in its course."

More to the point, the earlier chapters of Liber Aleph are swimming with this idea:

"The Fault, that is Fatality, in Love, as in every other Form of Will, is Impurity. It is not the Spontaneity thereof which worketh Woe, but some Repression in the Environment. In the Fable of Adam and Eve is this great Lesson taught by the Masters of the Holy Qabalah. For Love were to them the eternal Eden, save for the Repression signified by the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Thus their Nature of Love was perfect; it was their Fall from that Innocence which drove them from the Garden...

"But in this Matter be prudent and silent, discerning subtly and with acumen the nature of the Will within thee; so that thou mistake not Fear for Chastity, or Anger for Courage...

"Give Ear, give Ear attentively; the Will is not lost; though it be buried beneath a life-old midden of Repressions, for it persisteth vital within thee (is it not the true Motion of thine inmost Being?) and for all thy conscious Striving cometh forth by Night and by Stealth in Dream and Phantasy...ready to acquaint thee with thy true Nature, if thou attend to its Word, its Gesture, or its Show of Imagery...

"Therefore deem not that thy lightest Fancy is insignificant. Thy most unconscious Acts are Keys to the Treasure-Chamber of thine own Palace, which is the House of the Holy Ghost...

"For that Will, being always present, albeit (it may be) latent, discovereth himself when no longer inhibited by that conscious Control which is determined by Environment, and therefore of times contrary to himself."

"Bodily senses/emotions" or not, all these things deal with the idea of the "True Will" coming from within and showing itself when the conscious mind is quietened (i.e. "silenced") and prevented from suppressing or ignoring those signs (made "innocent" by refraining from passing judgment on perceptions of the self), which amounts to pretty much the same thing. As opposed, of course, to the idea that there is some external "Will of God" under which one's own nature must be suppressed, and denounced as being "of the devil", for instance.


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Perdurex
(@perdurex)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 35
16/10/2009 6:11 am  

The column in Liber 777 on 'transcendental morality' might have something to do with this topic, if you consider the 7 sins (lust, wrath etc.) emotional/instinctive responses to particular situations. In this respect they are useful for mapping your personal emotional composition on the tree of life structure.


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