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 Anonymous
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Dear all,

Just wondering what other literature besides Thelema everybody is into..
We discussed Clive Barker here a while ago, what other writers are sparkling your imagination?
Thomas Ligotti? H.P. Lovecraft? Tom Robbins? William Blake?
I myself am at the moment reading Bruno Schulz.
Schulz's mythmaking served as a rebellion against the banality of the everyday, searching for a truth which underlies appearances, or as his biographer Jerzy Ficowski puts it, "the mythological ascension of the everyday." This mythic existence which is hidden in the cracks of our reality, in the subjective time of what Schulz calls the"thirteenth freak month" that grows on the calendar, reminded me somewhat of Kenneth Grant's 'Nightside Narratives'.
The Nightside which is a personal realm of fantasy and dream which Schulz also called 'Regions of the great heresy'.


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 Anonymous
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Its a bit old now but I often go back to reread Bulwer Lyttons Zanoni. I found that whilst the language is understandable dated it does resonate with me and Zanoni's enounters with Adonai as his HGA very interesting. I also see a number of thelemic themes in the work.


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lashtal
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"ErichZann333" wrote:
...

With that user name I'm assuming a Lovecraft interest... One of my favourite writers of fiction. His poetry's pretty impressive, too...

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 Anonymous
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I read a lot of phillip K dick. either that or comics.


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 Anonymous
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David Foster Wallace. The short story 'Good Old Neon' would be a good entry point for curious thelemites in my opinion


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 Anonymous
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Robert Anton Wilson is a big favorite of mine. And Erin: Philip K. Dick rules. I'm currently reading VALIS, which is pretty great.
-R.Pike-


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Anonymous
 Anonymous
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he Wheel Of Time series, baby! Best fantasy books I've ever read. They're by Robert Jordan and it's a 10 part series (the 10th being a prelude to the first) about a Tolkien-esque world with different races though all very human-like. Deals with a magick of its' own sort, war, prophecy, gambling, chain collars and 'a dragon'. Can't recommend this strongly enough.

I also enjoy graphic novels like Warren Elises' Transmetropolitan, or "The Books of Magick" by the popular Neil Gaiman (a British series thought to be what Harry Potter was based off of). These have a special appearance of Gaimans' 'Constantine' who by the way, looks nothing like Keanu Reeves... In fact, he's a dirty blonde. Or if this is more up your alley "Johnny The Homicidal Maniac" is a favorite of all time. It's about a fucking homicidal maniac who kills the rich, snobby kids and the ugly revolting perverts too. He tries to get a girlfriend but the talking pillsberry dough boys convince him to knife her. He sees heaven and hell, and literally gets sent BACK! Again, a must read.

I also have a few books on some assorted subjects I like including a book on crystals and how to use them with everything, plants and herbs (especially herbs), astrology, numerology, dream interpretation, music theory, and religious stuff like a book on Zen, the bible, some Mormon stuff, etc., all for educational purposes.

Check some of the books out, they are in my opinion, very entertaining.


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Anonymous
 Anonymous
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Oh, and Terry Prachet's Discworld series, too. Another magick-related fiction book.


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the_real_simon_iff
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93!

Philip K. Dick - especially after his "revelation". (btw, anyone seen "A Scanner Darkly" yet?)

Robert Anton Wilson - when you are through with all his books, you can always start again...

Charles Bukowski, Henry Miller, D.H. Lawrence, writers that challenged their times and showed big love and humour ... for some reason I don't read any fantasy or Science fiction (besides PKD and RAW) ... don't know why ...

Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
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Another Bukowski reader here... and lately I've had a thing for Sax Rohmer, I know it's Yellow Peril/idealized Mystic East trash but I like it anyway. Something about the days when Brits could still swagger about the world as if they owned the place I find charming, those were simpler times (although they planted the seeds of resentment we are still reaping today)... sorry, that borders on political....

nick


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 Anonymous
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I haven't read much fiction, other than Crowley's, for a few years now. One series I do keep coming back to is Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles, the first five books; after those she gets a little obsessed with paedophilia and incest and the stories lose a lot of what made the original series great. Apparently so many 'fans' hated the fifth book, Memnoch: The Devil (my personal favourite), that she dropped the important aspects of the work and instead wrote bland one-dimensional pulp fiction. A great shame.


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 Anonymous
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I adore M.R James, such a talented writer.

I like Dan Simmons and the usual Ramsey Campbell and J. Herbet Etc.

Thomas Hardy by the way wrote really good Supernatural tales just in case anyone is slightly interested, I love his explorations through the more well known stories but the supernatural ones I do somewhat favour.

Irving Washington, and of course Henry James.

I have tried getting into Terry Pratchett but it just never seems to take off, I really dont know why.
I suppose Death is a likeable character mind. πŸ˜€

Oh and Hp Lovecraft, well I have had House On the Borderland on my book case for ages and still havent picked that for one reason or another.
I would like a collected works though, is there such an edition ?


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lashtal
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"Vilaven" wrote:
Oh, and Terry Prachet's Discworld series, too.

Absolutely! Perfect holiday reading...

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Michael Staley
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I love supernatural fiction in general, but have some favourite authors. Amongst them Lovecraft. I don't like all of his stuff, but the longer stories I love. Very favourite is probably "The Dreams in the Witch House", but I also love "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward", "At the Montains of Madness", and "The Shadow out of Time".

Although I've not yet read any others of his stories, William Hope Hodgson's "The House on the Borderland" mentioned a post or two earlier) is one of the most exciting stories I've read.

Bram Stoker's stories are great, too. "Dracula", obviously. Also great is "Jewel of Seven Stars".

Sax Rohmer did some interesting work, although in may cases the somewhat hackneyed device of a mechanist solution to what looks compellingly like supernatural events does become somewhat wearisome. My favourite story of his is "Dope".


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 Anonymous
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"Raych" wrote:
Oh and Hp Lovecraft, well I have had House On the Borderland on my book case for ages and still havent picked that for one reason or another.
I would like a collected works though, is there such an edition ?

That'll be William Hope Hodgson actually, it IS very Lovecraftian though a little less "cosmic", well worth reading though.

Oops, too too long to type that eh !


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 Anonymous
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John Cowper Powys. Wrote huge psychogeographical occult novels. You don't read them as such, more drift through them. His life ran parallel to A.C.'s in some respects, though Powys distrusted Crowley's reputation and, to the best of my knowledge, the two only met once (amicably).

Lovecraft, definitely; Sheridan LeFanu; Arthur Machen, whose writing I dislike in many respects but to which I always return; Maldoror; The Saragossa Manuscript; The House on the Borderland.


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LolaDaydream
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Science fiction/fantasy is my usual choice for fictional reading. Anything Tolkien-esque or with sexy vampires! Ok & I'll admit it - I've also read a few Harry Potters


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the_real_simon_iff
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93!

I forgot Burroughs! How could I! Just re-read his "Book of Dreams". Fantastic...

Love=Law
Lutz


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lashtal
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Norman Mailer's Ancient Evenings is pretty awesome, too...

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lashtal
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Ok - a recap is in order. Members of this site have so far recommended the following authors:

Bruno Schulz
Bulwer Lytton
H P Lovecraft
Aleister Crowley
Philip K Dick
David Foster Wallace
Robert Anton Wilson
Robert Jordan
Neil Gaiman
Terry Prachett
Charles Bukowski
Henry Miller
D H Lawrence
Sax Rohmer
Anne Rice
M.R James
Dan Simmons
Ramsey Campbell
James Herbert
Thomas Hardy
Henry James
William Hope Hodgson
Bram Stoker
John Cowper Powys
Sheridan LeFanu
Arthur Machen
William Burroughs
Norman Mailer
Charles De Lint
Robert Rankin
Algernon Blackwood
Robert Heinlein

What a well-read bunch we are!

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 Anonymous
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When you want to relive your horned god worshipping pagan youth, Charles De Lint's novels are great fun. Fantastic fairy tale atmospheres to them and Mr De Lint is also a folk singer, and his books have a very folksy feel to them.


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lashtal
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Fair comment! Summary list updated...

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 Anonymous
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Can we add in Algernon Blackwood? He might not have been the most famous Golden Dawn member, but he wrote some great stories.

I especially enjoy The Trod and The Touch of Pan.

...and thank the Gods that no one listed Dan Brown! πŸ™„

Tiresias


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spike418
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All time favourite novel is Heinleins Stranger in a Strange Land.
The discworld series of Pratchett are incredible reads.
I can't believe that no one else has mentioned Robert Rankin!
Particularly the Brentford trilogy and who do we think Hugo Rune is based on ? πŸ˜‰


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lashtal
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Doh!

Heinlein! How could we have got this far without a mention of Heinlein?

Rankin, Blackwood and Heinlein duly added to the list...

And a bar placed on the unutterably awful Dan Brown!

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 Anonymous
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No mention of Edgar Allan Poe yet? I'll pick him then, and I think I'll pick Iain Banks as well: I loved The Wasp Factory and The Crow Road.


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 Anonymous
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Edgar Allan Poe, of course! 😯

Good call Caradoc πŸ™‚


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 Anonymous
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My favourite author of all time has to be the marvelous Dan Bro....w..... Doh!


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lashtal
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"nashimiron" wrote:
My favourite author of all time has to be the marvelous Dan Bro....w..... Doh!

Easy! People have been kicked off LAShTAL.COM for less!

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 Anonymous
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Is he really that bad an author ? I havent read him but I am curious about 'Angels and Demons' is it dreadful ?


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lashtal
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Is it dreadful?

Yes.

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 Anonymous
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I would also like to mention Isidore Ducasse (Comte de Lautreamont).
'Les chants de Maldoror' is in my opinion a masterpiece and is actually an occult view of the world.
Good and evil are seen as equally important and mutually linked forces in nature, divorced from the moral content given to them by human beings. This is even noticeable in the name of the book's hero: Maldoror, which is a pun on 'mal d'aurore' (evil of dawn), the combination of darkness and light.
The book's phrase 'as beautiful as a chance meeting on a dissection table of a sewing machine and an umbrella' was also very important for the surrealists. It was valued because it was absolutely original in its combination of a banal object from everyday life with something that carries sinister and morbid overtones. The phrase also consists of a paradox, two of these objects have an constructive and therefore positive function, while the third has a dissecting and destructive, and therefore negative function. Yet these are only inanimate objects, it is only our imagination that puts "life" into them and give them these qualities.
It was this paradoxical metaphor that led Breton to describe Lautreaumont as the "unattackable".
The book also mocks science in its attempt to impose a static and rational order upon nature and attacks the belief that humanity is superior to the natural world. Religion is seen as an absurd delusion and god is seen as an unworthy, ineffectual, pathetic drunkard, scorned by the animals he is meant to have created.
This book can also be seen as a belief that the "traditionally ugly" can be transmuted to an aesthetic value.
Salvador Dali wrote:
"Repugnance is the sentry standing right near the door to those things that we desire most".

Have a taste of Maldoror's first two canto's:
http://www.kisa.ca/maldoror/english.html


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Michael Staley
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MANIO - it's all in the egg
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"LolaDaydream" wrote:
Ok & I'll admit it - I've also read a few Harry Potters

C'mon, Paul - if liking Dan Brown is a capital offence, what about Harry Potter?


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 Anonymous
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Well, there is literature and then there is fluff, and I believe even the most intelligent person should be allowed his/her fluffiness at times. The authors I mentioned -- Bukowski I would consider literature (although many would disagree) but Rohmer is pretty much fluff. Man does not live on steak alone, the occasional creampuff is okay.

nick

one of whose favorite books is "Smile on the Void" by Stuart Gordon.


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 Anonymous
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ok lashtal i'm curious now, whats the beef with dan brown? (never read any of his work)


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lashtal
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"Rikuth" wrote:
ok lashtal i'm curious now, whats the beef with dan brown? (never read any of his work)

Each to his/her own, I guess. I read several of the Harry Potter novels as bedtime stories to my son, for example, and thought they were okay...

Tell you what, read The Da Vinci Code and let us know what you think of it...

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 Anonymous
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just knowing the premise makes me not interested in reading it. I wouldn't think age old "basis of christianity questions" would have any effect on today's christians.

just asking since with the banning comment before it seems to be something "personal".


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lashtal
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Just my idea of a joke.

Sorry.

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 Anonymous
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oh no offence taken was just curious, thought there might be some good gossip behind it.

was kinda hoping for a funny "why I hate dan brown" essay


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 Anonymous
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Lately I've been reading Jorge Luis Borges and Umberto Eco. In particular Borges is one of my favorites right now. A friend of mine brought me to his attention and I've been fascinated with him ever since. His stories are bizar and wonderfull at the same time and underpin another reality if you care to read between the lines.
Also Umberto Eco's "the Name of the Rose" (cliche maybe) but wonderfull none the less.

R.A.Wilson ofcourse blew my mind initially and I've learned a lot from him.

Philip K. Dicks speed and amphetamine induced stories can really transport you to a bizar paranoid view of the world. His stories are often mistaken for science fiction but there's much more to them.
I also must confess a weakness for Arthur C. Clarke and his Rendevous with Rama series.

I also love E.A. Poe or H.P. Lovecraft for obvious reasons.

Also Terrence McKenna is hilarious. Especially if you read "True Hallucinations" WOW!

Finally I'm thinking about reading the Greek classics like "the Iliad and "the Oddisey"


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 Anonymous
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mmmm harry potter. I made a joke at a lodge meeting a few weeks ago "People have a hard time taking you seriously as an occultist when your favorite book is harry potter".

Yes, I admit it I'm a junkie for the lot.

My halloween costume last year. Olivia Westbrook, 6th year ravenclaw![/img]


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OKontrair
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I've read all of Dan Brown's books. (I get them for nothing and go on planes a lot.) They are reasonably good adventure stories. They are not remotely relevant for anyone interested in philosophy or history but are quite entertaining. They are constructed along the lines Crowley accuses Somerset Maugham of using and the plots are all identical. For anyone who hasn't read them (look away now) they go like this:

Grotesquely murdered body found in preposterous circumstances/ University lecturer called in to unravel problem under imposed time constraints/ female assistant intrudes herself into the case/ lightning tour of the world researching complicated clues/the butler or someone hitherto trusted did it/ any organisations libelled along the way are exonerated/protagonists finally get time to copulate.

About two months ago I was consulted by a telephone poll concerning the Da Vinci Code as well as a lot of other stuff - what car I drive, how much coffee I drink etc. Q.Have I read it? A.Yes. Q.Did I think it was truth or tosh? A.Tosh (I'm paraphrasing here - they were very sober and sensible) Q. Did I think the Roman Catholic Church was an evil organisation who lie about everything. A. Yup!

Crap survey gets you crap conclusions.

I also read some good books. I've never been disappointed by Cabbell and have just reread Figures of Earth and Hamlet had an Uncle. In a way all Cabbell's stuff has a samey feel to it but the difference being that what he has to say bears repeating. French writer Boris Vian is worth a look if you haven't already. His l'Ecume des Jours (translated as Froth on the Daydream by Stanley Chapman) has been retranslated by someone else I mean to read.

OK


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 Anonymous
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Just for fun! and of course the 'brilliant artwork'....read Dark Horse comics - Mike Mignola - Hellboy. Ive got all of them....My favourite are the illustrated volumes; Wake the devil, Seed of destruction, Conqueror worm, The right hand of doom, The chained coffin and others...

Lots of occult stuff, lovecraftian monsters, all the naughty stuff the nazis were getting up to with their fascination with the occult , folklore etc. etc.

P.S. and for those that like Clive Barker....he recommends them!!!! so hows that?!

Love is the Law, love under Will


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Anonymous
 Anonymous
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Again, graphic novelists though not actual paperback authors (because I didn't see them on the accumlative list):

Johnen Vasquez, he did Johnny The Homicidal Maniac, I feel sick, TV series Invader Zim and more.

also Roman Dirgo who created Lenore.

And hell, while on the subject let's say Bob Fingerman who did Minimum Wage. Great series.

Look up the art, you'll be thankful I'm pretty sure.


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priestofal
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For detective-type thrillers, I've enjoyed Andrew Vachss' Burke series, though I've only read a few. There's something Thelemic about a guy choosing to live outside, on the edge of things, and devoting himself to saving kids from the worst of the worst (worse than him) -- the Crowned & Conquering Child thing, I guess. I recommend him.


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joe93
(@joe93)
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What a fab list of lit! Tons of my heroes: HPL/PKD/RAW/Heinlein/Burroughs/Borges/Blake/Powys/'Maldoror'/Lawrence etc etc... I couldn't read either Dan Brown or the Harry Potters but my 'inner child' did like the movies of the latter. How about His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman? Sandy Robertson's Aleister Crowley Scrapbook has a great chapter on representations of A.C. in literature: has anybody else here tackled Anthony Powell's A Dance To The Music Of Time? I'm only up to volume two of twelve...
I did enjoy Kenneth Grant's novels and poetry. He mentions a few heavyweights like Proust in his trilogies, and there's an excellent reading list in Hidden Lore. There's lots of Do What Thou Wilt in these -
Demian (Herman Hesse)
Notes From The Underground (Dostoyevsky)
The Outsider (Camus)
Hell (Barbusse) (which Crowley hated!)
And a bit of Typhonian gnosis in Colin Wilson's Spider World books (giant spiders rule Earth in the 25th Century), and weirdly in a play by Sartre where a former Nazi wonders what the future crab people (no, I'm not making this up) in the 30th Century will make of his war crimes. In fact Sartre thought he was being followed by a giant lobster (the mescalin didn't help).
Has anybody actually mentioned Rabelais?! 😯 And Joyce's Ulysses is set in 1904! 😯 πŸ˜€


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 Anonymous
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Great to see Le Chants De Maldoror brought up. One of the few "novels" I've read more than once, (think it's up to 4 times now).Probably THE major influence on the Surrealist movement and all it has spawned. Delerious imagery with some scenes whose blasphemy still astonishes , even today, never mind when it was actually written. It was based or influenced by Melmoth The Wanderer by Maturin, a tome which I bought some time ago but have been too daunted to attempt to read.
I was interested to read somewhere (can't remember where offhand, possibly in the book "Nightmare Culture") that Maldoror was written "straight" first, then rewritten (remixed?) by Ducasse into the warped surreal horrorshow that exists today.This is also how Joyce's Finnegans Wake was written. I was a little disappointed by that, somehow it diminishes the impact for me a little, finding out that these works didn't emerge fully formed like that from the psyches of their protagonists.


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 Anonymous
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PS, Borges is essential, you must read him ! It is imperative to your mental health.The Circular Temple, what a story !


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 Anonymous
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In 1958, Robert Duncan put together a questionnaire which included this truly liberating entry:

'Name ten masterworks (of the order, that is, of The Bible, Das Kapital, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner ... ) which you have never read or which having read you remember nothing of, including on your list as many works as you can that you believe you will never read in your life ... (Do not include more than one work of any particular author.)

The mention of Rabelais above brought this rather guiltily to mind in my case.


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 Anonymous
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93 all!

Let's resurrect this topic for a bit shall we. Some of my favorite graphic novels are pretty much everything done by CLAMP. Especially "X" and "Tokyo Babylon". More of my favorite manga include "Sayuki", "Demon City Shinjuku", "Demon Tower Babylon", Ranma 1/2, Inuyasha, and Fullmetal Alchemist. I really enjoyed reading (twice now) R.A Salvatore's "The Cleric Quintet". I really like most all "Forgotten Realms" books. Especially those that feature Elminster. Well, I think thats enough for now, more to come later.

93 93/93


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