Notifications
Clear all

Literature  

Page 2 / 2
  RSS

kidneyhawk
(@kidneyhawk)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1842
30/10/2006 7:34 pm  

N.O.X.,

Have you read Grant Morrison and Dave McKean's Arkham Asylum? It's YEARS old-and for everyone who hasn't a clue what I'm talking about, it's a Batman Comic Book. A Batman Comic Book that features Alesiter Crowley, Carl Jung, mentions Frazier's Golden Bough, is loaded with Tarot images from the Harris/Thoth deck, offers stunning visual homage to art greats like Turner and pretty much shoves "The Bat" straight into a Tunnel of Set, unprepared...HIGHLY RECOMMENDED-both as a Tale and a Work of Art!


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
30/10/2006 11:01 pm  

Graphic Novel Magick:

A worldwide ritual, planned for the night of November 4 based on Alan Moore and David Lloyd's V for Vendetta! Details here:

http://knave.gratis-server.de/

Yeah baby, fight the power! 😛

radickal nick


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
31/10/2006 1:12 pm  

Thanks for telling me of that comic book kidneyhawk. Ordering myself a copy is on the top of my to-do list. There are multiple copies on ebay right now. Papanick, I can't get the link you posted to work.


ReplyQuote
kidneyhawk
(@kidneyhawk)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 1842
31/10/2006 1:28 pm  

N.O.X.-you're going to LOVE it! Really!

And, Papanick, the great Alan Moore also deserves mention of his compendium FROM HELL (the Jack The Ripper Graphic Novel-which is the size of a PHONEBOOK!!!). I fortunately watched the MOVIE before I read the comic and this, I felt, was the right order of going about it. The film was really well done, I thought and I wanted More (Moore?). The graphic novel followed like an ultra-extended appendix and took the tale into areas which I think a lot of folks on this site would find fascinating. The Dionysian Artificers are discussed in great length, the "secret" bloody history of London and its dark Magickal import and quite a few cameos in the comic will be of great interest. Yeats, Blake and AC himself both as a child and adult. The Ripper Character comes across with a GREAT degree (Masonic Pun not intended) of Genius-the kind of frightening genius where you know chopping up the ladies of the night is just not RIGHT but you peek into the dark illumination of his mind and realize that his madness and possession is counterbalanced by an overwhelming spiritual force, one that is not quite right but HUGE (He would have made a great Treadwell's Speaker-just RUN HOME afterwards!!!)

Moore also draws from Jean Overton-Fuller's work and she, of course, is the biographer of Neuberg. There's a lot of chop-chop in the comic, in much more detail than the film (!!!) but not in any lurid "comic book" sort of fashion. The style is reminiscent of Turn of the Century (last not this) Newspaper illustrations and contributes to the overall feel.

One of the best graphic novels I've EVER read.

But I AM a Grant Morrison fan and Arkham Asylum is ahead by a stretch!

PS-Arkham Asylum (again for those who are wondering what I'm talking about) is illustrated by Dave McKean, the Artistic Genius behind the film Mirror Mask.

N.O.X., please post your thoughts when you get the book! I'll be really interested in hearing your impressions!

It ain't Manga! 😈


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
31/10/2006 2:53 pm  

93, I'd have to second kidneyhawks rec. of the Arkham Asylum graphic novel by Morrison and McKean, it is truly awesome. 93 93/93


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
31/10/2006 4:43 pm  

93

Greetings! I'll definetly be getting these graphic novels ASAP. I'm very interested in the "From Hell " one, as I love that movie and have watched it many times. Ah, kidneyhawk I see you are a fellow fan of Mirror Mask. I started a thread on that a long time ago that dissapeared with the cafe. I've noticed it manifested itself under a different form once more in "Recommendations" . Apparently LAM opened The Way once again. 😉

93 93/93


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
21/11/2006 6:43 pm  

Aum! All words are sacred and all prophets true.

So many great books and authors have been noted.

I would like to add a few recommendations.

*Good Omens by Pratchett and Gaimon*

notable for the presence in the novel of the ‘Demon Crowley’

&

*Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell: A Novel by Susanna Clarke*

if one enjoys harry potter they may like this

&

*The Oversoul 7 Trilogy by Jane Roberts*

i found the series to be an intriguing take on the concept of the Holy Guardian Angel.

&

*The Goat Foot God by Dion Fortune*

amusingly written novel which explores the theory and practice of Fertility Rites.

Save only that they understand a little


ReplyQuote
Mykaljon
(@mykaljon)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 49
21/11/2006 7:35 pm  

Arthur Machen. The Three Imposters. The Great God Pan. The House of Souls.
W.H. Hodgson. The Ghost Pirates. House on the Borderland. The Night Land.
Clark Ashton Smith
HPL
Umberto Eco: Foucault's Pendulum
Gerard Suster (Devil's Maze, Labyrinth of Satan, God Game - Based on Machen's Three Imposters, in which the characters from the novel appear to haunt both Machen and Gerard Stride, a character in the novels who is Suster himself. I've just been reading these: pretty cool stuff. Suster wrote a biography of Crowley and Machen was a member of the GD and close friend of Waite, so fit it all in as you will. Yeats and Crowley appear in the novels.
Alan Garner
All quirky old 19th - early 20th Century old fantasy, Lost race and Supernatural Fiction - I've been reading and dealing in the stuff for 25 years or more.

Michael John Thompson
http://www.ThompsonRareBooks.com
http://www.mjtbooks.com
http://www.BeltaneBooks.com (forthcoming)

Stay calm: be brave: wait for the signs.


ReplyQuote
Bedazzled
(@bedazzled)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 38
21/11/2006 7:36 pm  

I'll throw in a couple of stylists: Nabokov's Pale Fire (what a strange and beautiful book that is, nothing else like it in literature) and London Fields by Martin Amis. Darts Keith innit.


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
21/11/2006 9:47 pm  

After looking it up, Pale Fire sounds interesting, and very unconventional. The only Nabokov I have read are in the large Collected Stories volume put out by Penguin.There are many places in those stories where the strangeness of Nabokovs imagination shines through.He had an obsession with fairies, spirits and angels, and they emerge fully formed in the middle of stories conjured from such incredibly beautiful language. And thats language that's been translated from the Russian. There's little overt occult content to interest Lashtalers, but like I said, the language is just LUSH !


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
21/11/2006 10:00 pm  

Nabokov had synesthesia which probably contributed to the vividness of his description. he also wrote a lot of his work in English and was the translator of his own earlier work from the Russian. quite a guy.


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
21/11/2006 10:06 pm  

Ezra Pound's The Cantos and James Joyce's Ulysses and Finnegans Wake are currently my favorite sources of literature. Both wrote with a deep grasp of qabalah and both were familiar with AC and incorporated Thelemic elements into their works. See the last couple of pages of Ulysses as an example. One day, in my copious free time, I intend to write an essay outlining the thelemic influence upon Finnegans Wake which is profound. He even references the Abbey in it.


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
22/11/2006 10:33 am  

For fiction I tend to go for escapism - a good sci fifantasy story is great. Some favourites are:

Michael Moorcock - especially Hawkmoon & Elric
Raymond E Feist
L E Modesitt's ongoing Recluce saga - interesting chaosorder magical system. The series tells stories from both the "good" side and "bad" side and it's well enough done that "good" and "bad" are subjective.
Umberto Ecco - Foucault's Pendulum is great.
David Gemmel does great mindless hack & slash fantasy.His semi-historical novels are interesting.


ReplyQuote
algoul
(@algoul)
Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 61
22/11/2006 12:13 pm  

I'd like to suggest "The Star Rover" by Jack London


ReplyQuote
wulfram
(@wulfram)
Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 137
22/11/2006 12:25 pm  

A quick list of some of my favorites:

Umberto Eco
Robert E. Howard
HP Lovecraft
Edgar Allen Poe
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
W Somerset Maughum
Sir Walter Scott
Katherine Kurtz
Mary Stewart
Richard Matheson
Stephen Mark Rainey
Neil Gaiman
RAW


ReplyQuote
jdes
 jdes
(@jdes)
Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 61
22/11/2006 5:53 pm  

A few of my past favs in no particular order:
Robert M. Pirsig
Umberto Eco
Robert Anton Wilson
William Burroughs
Salman Rushdie
Franz Kafka
Hermenn Hesse
Jean Paul Satre
James Joyce
Arthur C Clarke
Norman Mailer

Once read a novel by Salvador Dali (no longer have it - can't recall its title - anybody know?)

Currently reading a Cyril Connolly book The Unquiet Grave - there's a mention of A.C. in it somewhere. And have the Fagles translations of Homer's Illiad and Odyssey on one side which I'm going to get to reading one day.


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
22/11/2006 7:45 pm  

Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum

Robert A. Heinlein
Stranger in a Strange Land
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
Fear No Evil
Time Enough for Love

Young Goodman Brown by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Jack Vance's Eyes of the Overworld


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
22/11/2006 8:39 pm  

also:
Bulgakov's Master and Margarita

Frank Herbert's Dune
Dune Messiah
Children of Dune
God Emperor of Dune

Piers Anthony's Blue Adept Books
Split Infinity
Blue Adept
Juxtaposition

Aristophanes' Frogs

Burroughs' Cities Of The Red Night

Shakespeare A Midsummer Night's Dream

Jean Genet Our Lady of the Flowers

C.S. Lewis's Out of the Silent Planet
Perelandra
That Hideous Strength

Euripides The Bacchae


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
23/11/2006 10:12 am  

Since Alan Moore's comics were brought up, "Promethea" doesn't even try to elude to magickal ideas, but rather exploits them throughout. The art is simply AMAZING. I just bought the first 10 issues, and am blown away:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Promethea


ReplyQuote
 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
07/12/2006 3:37 pm  

Heartkore: I really encourage you to finish Promethea, it builds intop a Kabalic frenzy that is so wonderfully heartfelt, kind and sympathetic that it could successfully induct a sixteen year old into some Honest to Gawrsh mysteries without causing any long term brain damage. It quite literally blew me away (or at least some of the less likeable parts of me). It sends your dream weird though.

Oh, and it ends with the Apocalypse. The actual veil wrent and everything.

I would say it woke me up to what Crowley meant, to others as well as me. It also marked the effective end of my badly handled, Void-tumbling adolescence.

I cannot recommend it highly enough.


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2
Share: